Main definitions of break in US English:

: break1break2

break1

verbbroke, broken

  • 1Separate or cause to separate into pieces as a result of a blow, shock, or strain.

    no object ‘the rope broke with a loud snap’
    with object ‘windows in the street were broken by the blast’
    ‘the slate fell from my hand and broke in two on the hard floor’
    ‘break the chocolate into pieces’
    • ‘The cup broke under the strain.’
    • ‘Take four eggs and break each one separately in a saucer to test for quality before adding to the sugar and beat until the mix is creamy.’
    • ‘Her metal harness buckle breaks and she plunges to her death.’
    • ‘We then come to the mast's boom that has broken into two pieces over the ship's hull.’
    • ‘I broke it into small pieces and put it in a bowl.’
    • ‘Most of the rubbish was polystyrene and the children were just breaking it into small pieces and strewing it all over the ground, and we all know what a mess this material makes when broken.’
    • ‘Frank broke a handful of crackers into his soup.’
    • ‘The car was stolen after a thief broke a window at Mr Westwood's home, taking his car keys and mobile telephone.’
    • ‘She scribbled answers hard on the paper, constantly breaking the lead of her mechanical pencil.’
    • ‘After a drawn-out moment, the barrier surrounding me broke.’
    • ‘‘The men then tied a tow rope to the machine and broke the security housing around it,’ added Mr Patel.’
    • ‘I tore off a tiny piece and it broke every time I stretched it.’
    • ‘The crew survived, but the aircraft exploded when its payload of munitions blew up breaking the windows of many local houses in the blast.’
    • ‘She ran to the vending machines and broke the glass.’
    • ‘A flood wall broke and water is flooding the city at an alarming rate.’
    • ‘Six ropes had been broken and small trees around had all been pulled down.’
    • ‘With a few quick steps, she grasped the extinguisher, and rammed it into the glass door of the vending machine, breaking the glass.’
    • ‘At the head of the table, he broke pieces of bread into his soup with trembling hands.’
    • ‘The mirror had been broken, its shattered pieces falling onto the wooden chest and green carpeting.’
    • ‘His brows creased as he tried to break a piece of chocolate and he smiled when he broke it off.’
    shatter, smash, smash to smithereens, crack, snap, fracture, fragment, splinter
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    1. 1.1 Sustain an injury involving the fracture of a bone or bones in a part of the body.
      with object ‘she had broken her leg in two places’
      no object ‘what if his leg had broken?’
      • ‘Coastguards and paramedics sprinted more than a mile to the aid of a woman who had broken her ankle while walking along a cliff edge in Whitby.’
      • ‘The 18-year-old fell from the roof of Crumbs Bakery suffering extensive injuries by breaking both his legs and an arm.’
      • ‘One woman broke a leg and the others had minor injuries.’
      • ‘He fractured both legs, broke his right ankle and had deep cuts to his forehead.’
      • ‘The passenger - who has not been named - broke his leg and suffered a minor head injury after both were struck by the car.’
      • ‘Emily had broken her arm falling off a piano stool and was ever so desperate to tell me all about it!’
      • ‘She broke her foot recently in practice and will not be competing until after Christmas.’
      • ‘Another patient broke both his legs jumping from the third floor.’
      • ‘She slipped on damp grass, breaking a leg, cracking a bone in the other and hurting her shoulder.’
      • ‘It was her fault that Fay had broken her wrist.’
      • ‘In 1968 she was a passenger in a car when a lorry came out of a side turning and crashed into her, breaking both her arms and legs and causing other injuries.’
      • ‘Osteoporosis raises the risk of breaking a hip, yet femoral neck fractures in such patients are not always seen on x ray.’
      • ‘A pensioner who broke her ankle while walking her dog has spoken out in praise of a scheme to boost community spirit.’
      • ‘No one saw the attack which left Mrs Anderton, a lively and intelligent widow, with a fractured hip and broken wrist.’
      • ‘A pensioner tripped over a pub's open cellar doors and broke his neck, an inquest heard.’
      • ‘He spent more than a month in hospital recovering from his many injuries, which included breaking both legs, his collar bone and jaw and he is still undergoing treatment.’
      • ‘He broke his shoulder, fractured eight ribs, punctured a lung and almost died.’
      • ‘Kelly, aged 24, suffered whiplash and a back injury, but her daughter broke her leg.’
      • ‘He had sustained serious head injuries, and broke his right elbow and left leg.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, she landed badly, breaking a leg and fracturing a bone at the bottom of her spine.’
      fracture, crack, smash
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    2. 1.2with object Cause a cut or graze in (the skin)
      ‘the bite had scarcely broken the skin’
      • ‘If I had done it only at a slightly different angle, it probably wouldn't have even broken the skin.’
      • ‘Without wasting a second he forced the blade of the knife against my throat and pushed as hard as he could without breaking the skin.’
      • ‘I sucked in a sharp breath as the blade broke my skin.’
      • ‘I looked at the palms of my hands, and saw that I had broken the skin with my nails.’
      • ‘Her mother, Julie, removed her sandals and examined her feet and legs for signs that the needle had broken the skin.’
      • ‘Her blade traced a horizontal line on his throat, a scratch that just barely broke the skin, but not enough to draw blood.’
      • ‘I knew that it hadn't broken the skin, but she scraped her nail against my skin hard enough for me to feel pain.’
      • ‘The gun barrel dug so deep into her ribs that it actually broke the skin.’
      • ‘It transpires that the snake had actually managed to bite through Ian's shinguards before breaking the skin.’
      • ‘Looking down I realized that I had been holding the blade so tight that I had broken the skin.’
      • ‘He clenched his fists so tightly that he broke the skin on his palms.’
      • ‘New-fallen powder may be soft, but after a time it can compress, melt, form a layer of ice on its surface that is quite capable of breaking the skin.’
      • ‘She punched the wall, breaking the skin on her fist.’
      • ‘It didn't break the skin and they didn't think it was serious until a few weeks ago half of her body was going numb.’
      • ‘In the ensuing struggle she bit the security guard, breaking the skin and causing reddening and abrasions, the court heard.’
      • ‘Each time she attempted to move she felt the sharp edge of the blade break her skin.’
      • ‘With Patton in the saddle and leaning forward, the horse arose, reared back his head, and struck Patton on the eyebrow, breaking the skin.’
      • ‘It was only a nip and it didn't break the skin, but it is about what the dog may do the next time.’
      • ‘His long nails streaked down his face, breaking the delicate skin.’
      • ‘A few shards of glass got stuck in my palm, breaking the skin.’
      pierce, puncture, penetrate, perforate
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    3. 1.3 Make or become inoperative.
      no object ‘the machine has broken and they can't fix it until next week’
      with object ‘he's broken the video’
      • ‘If your washing machine breaks it will be guaranteed.’
      • ‘And, just to add insult to injury, I've even broken his bloody coffee machine!’
      • ‘He thinks he broke the machine when he accidentally minimized a window.’
      • ‘If he didn't watch what he was doing, he really was going to break one of these machines.’
      • ‘The ticket machine had broken and the punters were advised to pay on the train.’
      • ‘The video then shows him break the camera and the picture goes dead.’
      • ‘It would seem like the sort of machine you'd break just by turning it off.’
      • ‘I just figured some machine broke causing a big power outage.’
      • ‘Someone broke the machine by jamming pencils in to it.’
      • ‘Her video camera broke, and they took shelter in the women's restroom to work on it.’
      • ‘He turned and knocked the machine over breaking it.’
      • ‘To their credit, the locals at first rebelled by breaking the machine so that no one could pay, but over time the revolution vanished like sand through so many fists.’
      • ‘When she went back in after the last strike days she discovered that whoever had been trying to operate her machine had broken it instead.’
      • ‘However, in the ensuing minutes there was an argument, during which the sewing machine got broken.’
      • ‘Second, I check whether I'm still able to judge speed and distance accurately by making sure I can get my car key in the door lock without breaking it or scratching the paintwork too much.’
      • ‘They protested against the factories by breaking the machines.’
      • ‘Right now, we've broken two bubble machines and have to buy a third one.’
      • ‘My wife is emphatic about having to wear a certain outfit she pulled from the dirty clothes hamper to the party we have been invited to later, so, of course, the washing machine breaks.’
      • ‘When the washing machine broke he fixed it so well it washed the clothes twice as fast, and picked up National Radio.’
      • ‘We should simply break the machines and return to our caves.’
      stop working, cease to function, cease to work, break down, go wrong, give out, develop a fault, malfunction, be damaged, be unusable
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    4. 1.4 (of the amniotic fluid surrounding a fetus) be or cause to be discharged when the sac is ruptured in the first stages of labor.
      no object ‘she realized her water had broken’
      • ‘A few minutes into the journey the contractions got so bad Rachel had to clamber into the back seat where her waters broke.’
      • ‘Her waters broke as soon as she got into the ambulance.’
      • ‘The day after at 6.15 am I woke to go to the toilet, I felt a pop and it turned out to be my waters breaking.’
      • ‘Two days before my mothers' water broke, my father took me to the Florida Mall and we brought me some clothes.’
      • ‘When I was seven and a half months pregnant, I was on the way to the photocopier in the office, when my waters broke.’
      • ‘But as luck would have it Jane's water broke at 11 am so we returned to the hospital.’
      • ‘She was twenty-six weeks pregnant when her waters broke on Friday, December 7.’
      • ‘Her labour was going like clockwork when her waters broke on the evening of her due date.’
      • ‘I was in and out of hospital for about three weeks and then my waters broke.’
      • ‘I was desperately wanting her waters to break while I was there so we could all experience the joy of childbirth together, but they didn't.’
      • ‘Then at about midday or she calls to say, rather matter-of-factly, I thought, that her waters had broken and that she was having the baby.’
      • ‘Then to make matters worse, I thought my waters had broken as I felt the back of me suddenly become wet.’
      • ‘Most commonly, about 90% of the time, your water breaks when your cervix is fully dilated.’
      • ‘She went to the bathroom and her waters broke, and she felt the urge to push.’
      • ‘Emma's waters broke while talking to Ed, so it was him that got her to the hospital and held her hand throughout labour.’
      • ‘Looking down at her feet, she realized that her water had just broken.’
      • ‘Rebecca's waters broke at about 4.30 am at their home in Kiltie Road, Tiptree.’
      • ‘On Monday morning at 5.30 Susanne woke me to tell me that her waters had broken.’
      • ‘Although Sara was due in early June, her water broke yesterday.’
      • ‘The consultant agreed I could have an epidural if I agreed to have my waters broken - seemed like a fair deal to me.’
    5. 1.5informal with object Open (a safe) forcibly.
      • ‘The maid broke the safe and stole money and jewellery.’
      • ‘They broke the safe in the Accounts Section and made away with the day's receipts.’
      • ‘If a burglar breaks the safe and steals the guns, I won't be held responsible for their criminal use because I did what I reasonably could to secure them.’
    6. 1.6with object Use (a piece of paper currency) to pay for something and receive change out of the transaction.
      ‘she had to break a ten’
      • ‘I haven't got any change, and I don't want to break a fiver.’
      • ‘Most of us are more inclined to break a note than fish around trying to find the right change.’
      • ‘Like my sister said, once you break a twenty the rest just disappears.’
    7. 1.7no object (of two boxers or wrestlers) come out of a clinch, especially at the referee's command.
      ‘I was acting as referee and telling them to break’
      • ‘He said the first damaging blow came after the referee had told them to break and stop punching.’
      • ‘The ref was not between the fighters but he was instructing them to break.’
      • ‘He possibly could have cautioned him for holding and hitting as well, or he could have simply ordered them to break.’
    8. 1.8with object Unfurl (a flag or sail).
      • ‘We opened with the Canadian National Anthem and our Scout and Venture Leader broke the flag to open the festivities.’
      • ‘I even broke out the sail for a few minutes until I got bored and switched back to paddling.’
      • ‘When the chief Scout Master broke the flag a huge roar went up from the boys.’
    9. 1.9with object Succeed in deciphering (a code).
      • ‘While attempting to break the Nazi codes, his character becomes obsessed with finding the woman he loves.’
      • ‘It would be a bit unfair to offer clues right now, if someone is close to breaking the code.’
      • ‘But if you could factor large numbers then you could break these codes.’
      • ‘I started trying to break the code and was getting nowhere.’
      • ‘At that point they'd broken the code, and they told people whether or not they'd received cells.’
      • ‘It's a computer program that's used to break ciphers.’
      • ‘Well done to all who managed to break the code yesterday!’
      • ‘Then you have to spend time breaking the code and making your own key, which only lets you hotwire the vehicle.’
      • ‘This was discovered by an astute cryptanalyst at Central Bureau and in April 1943 that code was broken.’
      • ‘They were desperately looking for any clue that would help them break the code.’
      • ‘In an interactive lecture, he then examined the tricks used to break such codes.’
      • ‘We have a large exhibit on World War II cipher machines and the machines that broke the enemy's codes.’
      • ‘There then follows a long and tedious account of how they broke the enigma code.’
      • ‘I feel that I am very close to breaking the code.’
      • ‘When all the analyses were ready, the code was broken.’
      • ‘He starts to punch in numbers at random in an attempt to break the code and patch into the system.’
      • ‘Another way to become rich and famous is to devise, or break a code.’
      • ‘Here is where Alan Turing broke the codes that maybe won the second world war.’
      • ‘There is little doubt that trying to break simple codes enhances one's understanding of cryptography.’
      • ‘It was created in 1943 to break German codes.’
      decipher, decode, decrypt, unravel, solve, work out
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    10. 1.10with object Open (a shotgun or rifle) at the breech.
      • ‘I broke the gun, and the spent hull ejected amid a brief curl of smoke.’
      • ‘Gun-handling safety guidelines require a shooter to use a breaking type shotgun and to break the shotgun if approached by a member of the public.’
      • ‘She broke open the weapon, ejecting the spent shells.’
      • ‘I broke the gun and dropped a pair of low-brass 8s in the tubes.’
      • ‘My scope stayed on the motionless body for a short time until I broke the rifle and sat down with my back leaning on the small ledge.’
    11. 1.11with object Disprove (an alibi).
      • ‘But analysis of soil in his trouser cuffs broke his alibi and clinched the case.’
      • ‘He was arrested then released when the police couldn't break his alibi.’
      • ‘The former husband emerged as the most promising suspect after the detectives were able to break his alibi.’
    12. 1.12with object Invalidate (a will) through legal process.
      • ‘Remote heirs broke his will.’
      • ‘The four living children broke the will.’
  • 2with object Interrupt (a continuity, sequence, or course)

    ‘the new government broke the pattern of growth’
    ‘his concentration was broken by a sound’
    • ‘We have to break this vicious cycle between drug dependency and crime.’
    • ‘The key to breaking the cycle is to boost demand and take up the slack in the economy.’
    • ‘Generally, if a week is not one of employment, continuity is broken, so that the employee has to start again to pick up continuity.’
    • ‘We can then break the poverty cycle by giving these disadvantaged children opportunities to get work and employment.’
    • ‘Imprisonment does not break the cycle of offending and addiction.’
    • ‘England's win against West Indies last year broke a sequence of nine decisive matches which were all won by the team fielding first.’
    • ‘The schools offer a possible way of breaking the cycle of illiteracy.’
    • ‘Your slumbers are broken bright and early with a cup of tea brought to your tent.’
    • ‘Everyone has a part to play in breaking this vicious cycle.’
    • ‘Max yelled, raised one eyebrow, paused for effect, breaking the rhythm.’
    • ‘We found it worth venturing into Woolacombe to break the routine.’
    • ‘Then came metal hulls and steam power, and the historical line of continuity was broken.’
    • ‘They must start to break their sequence of drawn games and start winning consistently if they are to retain their title.’
    • ‘After a long pause he broke the tranquility again’
    • ‘The solitude was broken, bizarrely, by bumping into Michael Palin and his film crew working on their next project in the Hoggar Mountains.’
    • ‘The team broke its five-game losing streak.’
    • ‘Theo, his concentration finally broken, stopped typing and looked up.’
    • ‘He will enlist the help of three minders to clear his path and stop the crowd breaking his concentration.’
    • ‘Ballet had created continuity in my life, but now that the left side of my body did not serve me, the continuity was broken.’
    • ‘It means forgiving those who have hurt you and breaking the cycle of abuse.’
    interrupt, disturb, interfere with
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    1. 2.1 Put an end to (a silence) by speaking or making contact.
      • ‘And now that they have broken their silence, it is hoped that others will find the courage to do the same.’
      • ‘She felt it was her job to break the silence between the two.’
      • ‘The former girlfriend of a man accused of murder admitted yesterday that she broke her silence about the killing after police threatened to implicate her.’
      • ‘The actress has broken her silence about the whirlwind romance.’
      • ‘Yesterday, she broke her silence on the whispering campaign against her.’
      • ‘She decided to break her silence because she thought it was the only way the council would listen to her concerns even though it meant sacrificing her job.’
      • ‘More recently the firm broke its silence and revealed he had been hit by a viral infection and would not be back at work until May 10.’
      • ‘But it was not until last summer that she broke her silence and called her former lover, when she feared biographers would unearth the details.’
      • ‘She has broken her silence to speak of her determination to return to the post she has held for the past 10 years.’
      • ‘Now he breaks his silence about the flawed evidence.’
      • ‘He recently broke his silence, admitting that he went to England after losing his job in Paris and had tried to commit suicide.’
      • ‘A father of two has broken his silence after keeping his sighting of a ghost 15 years ago at Woodville Halls Theatre a fearful secret.’
      • ‘A staff member caught up in the raid broke his silence on the experience yesterday.’
      • ‘The coroner has urged those who know the names of the killers to break their silence.’
      • ‘Then an unknown pilot broke the silence and asked, ‘Wasn't I married to you once?’’
      • ‘Liam did not break his silence over the abuse until two years ago.’
      • ‘‘Melissa,’ said Matthew breaking the silence and speaking for the first time since the fight had started.’
      • ‘Police were alerted to the abuse around 20 years after it was carried out when the victim broke his silence.’
      • ‘My mother broke the silence with a question, ‘Do you live nearby?’’
      • ‘At last, he broke the silence: ‘What are you writing about these days, anyway?’’
    2. 2.2British Make a pause in (a journey)
      ‘we will break our journey in Venice’
      • ‘He started to search for a sheltered spot where he could break his journey.’
      • ‘I wondered whether I should have stopped to talk with him that day, whether I should have broken my walk.’
      • ‘I have broken the journey to dive on Sweden's west coast and on some freshwater wrecks in Lake Vattern.’
      • ‘The Nepal trek will be broken by a transfer between two points.’
      • ‘He probably caught the later train from Nottingham, and never broke his journey at Sheffield at all.’
      • ‘He has a house in Burgundy, about halfway between Tuscany and England, and it was agreed to break the journey there.’
      • ‘There is plenty to do here and you may well decide to break your journey.’
      • ‘A list of visiting ships is still posted in reception, just as it was when they broke their voyages here en route to South Africa, and their guests came ashore in open boats.’
      • ‘Our journey back home to Doncaster from the Lakes is broken at Skipton to do our weekend shopping.’
      • ‘As part of their project, they created an Oak tree grove, with picnic and seating area, an ideal spot to rest or break a long journey.’
      • ‘They wished to break their journey for the night, and replenish their stock of fresh food before tackling the Great River.’
      • ‘The newspapers reported that some passengers were breaking their journey at Earl's Court just to ride the escalator.’
      • ‘There always seemed to be somebody there breaking their walk and brewing up.’
      • ‘If travelling from the distant south, consider breaking your journey with a day diving the Clyde or Oban.’
      • ‘Some of the long-distance festival visitors have become semi-regulars, breaking their train journeys at York just to sup a pint at The Maltings.’
      • ‘Although the trip could comfortably be accomplished in one day I chose to break my journey at Middletown for an overnight stay.’
      • ‘Break the monotony of a long journey with frequent stops.’
      • ‘He broke his journey for the winter in Germany.’
      • ‘I broke my journey several times.’
      • ‘If you are planning to break your journey midway, some airlines offer free stopovers while others charge a fee.’
    3. 2.3no object Stop proceedings in order to have a pause or vacation.
      ‘at mid-morning they broke for coffee’
      • ‘Packing was in full flow when I got to the office, but we broke for lunch, after which we tackled the cupboard full of unclaimed review kit.’
      • ‘The association will break for the summer but the executive will continue to meet as usual.’
      • ‘We broke for sticky cake at 11, then continued working.’
      • ‘I broke for breakfast and got all tied up with washing and washing up and ended up wandering over to Asda through the lovely warm sun, so I didn't actually get anything else written until after lunch.’
      • ‘Even when they broke for dinner, the taunting continued.’
      • ‘When school broke for summer last week, 91 students filed out of High Park N.S. and went home to enjoy the summer holidays.’
      • ‘They last met on August 7 when the fourth round of six-way talks broke for a recess.’
      • ‘By the time Council finally passed an operating budget and broke for recess in late June, more than a few players lay injured on the field.’
      • ‘Anyway, school broke for holidays, and I forgot all about it.’
      • ‘Parliament didn't exactly clean off their desks before they broke for summer recess last Friday.’
      • ‘Each division we'll then play on alternative Saturdays and unlike the junior divisions will not break for Christmas.’
      • ‘If you must break for tea, keep it quick.’
      • ‘I actually love spring break, and desperately want to break for spring.’
      • ‘It will then break for almost a month, before returning to the Guildhall for two to three weeks from July 2.’
      • ‘At 8.30, with half the agenda dealt with (nine minutes per item), we broke for a moment.’
      • ‘They are up extremely high, and they decide to break for lunch.’
      • ‘The club will run until June, break for the summer and resume again in September.’
      • ‘We repeat that a few times and then break for lunch.’
      • ‘We break for lunch of salad with couscous, salmon and chicken.’
      • ‘The group meets every fortnight though they're set to break for the summer.’
      stop, pause, have a break, take a break, have a rest
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    4. 2.4 Lessen the impact of (a fall)
      ‘she put out an arm to break her fall’
      • ‘My right arm went out to break my fall and I ended up landing right on my shoulder.’
      • ‘In an attempt to break her fall she put her hand out and it hit the wall, breaking a bone in her wrist.’
      • ‘Don't put your hands out to break your fall, or you might injure yourself.’
      • ‘Down I fell towards the ground, but on the way I hit several branches, which really broke my fall.’
      • ‘Her involuntary reflexes kicked in, and she threw out her arms, managing to break his fall.’
      • ‘The move was so unexpected that he lost his balance, and threw his arm out to break his fall.’
      • ‘He landed in some bushes that broke his fall.’
      • ‘The crewman lost his balance and lurched toward a forward panel, instinctively breaking his fall with an out-thrust hand.’
      • ‘He was the only one who jumped over the precipice hoping that they'd be a tree to break his fall.’
      • ‘All three friends ran and jumped into the hole, hoping that there was something soft to break their fall.’
      • ‘Miraculously, a tree broke his fall.’
      • ‘When she and Matt fell, she had stuck out her hands to break the fall.’
      • ‘The backpack had broken her fall, but it hadn't kept the breath from getting knocked out of her.’
      • ‘His fall was broken by some bins.’
      • ‘He survived with three cracked vertebrae and a dislocated finger after the roof of a shack broke his fall.’
      • ‘The stone of the remaining steps would have made violent impact with his head if something had not broken his fall.’
      • ‘She tripped on the bottom step, yelling out automatically and stretching out her arms to break her fall.’
      • ‘Who hasn't broken an impending fall with an outstretched hand, which can jar the bones of the elbow out of place?’
      • ‘She fell to the dirt like a doll, her arms breaking the fall painfully.’
      • ‘As she fell backwards she put her hands out to break the fall.’
      cushion, lessen the impact of, reduce the impact of, soften the impact of, take the edge off, diminish, moderate, mitigate
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    5. 2.5 Put an end to (a tie in a game) by making a score.
      • ‘If the candidates cannot reach an agreement, the candidates have the option of breaking the tie by a coin toss or by asking to rerun the elections for that position.’
      • ‘At Oakbank, Kyle Scott broke a scoreless tie.’
      • ‘This will be awarded by a vote of the copy editors, the head of the desk to cast two votes if necessary to break a tie.’
      • ‘This is unsurprising because most of them would not have had any experience of balloting procedures or how to break a tie.’
      • ‘In that case the team with the higher score wins, and in case of a tie, more hands are played until the tie is broken.’
      • ‘If both sides have nine and a half points, the cards are recounted in a different way to break the tie.’
      • ‘One of the perennial problems of tournament play is how to break ties.’
      • ‘Whoever owns the higher card breaks the tie and wins.’
      • ‘Waterloo came out on top, however, taking all three of their mixed doubles and breaking the tie with the Blues.’
      • ‘With her runner-up finish, she broke a three-way tie for the points lead and now has sole possession of the top spot.’
      • ‘Mid-way through the period, Windsor broke the scoreless tie on a contentious goal.’
      • ‘The game remained deadlocked until Payne, coming off the bench, broke the tie for good.’
      • ‘Occasionally a third will be called in to break a tie between the previous two.’
      • ‘For this purpose the score for a simple game is ignored except to break ties.’
      • ‘He hit a home run to break a second-game tie and help the Mets to a sweep.’
      • ‘Ties were broken by the position of the sixth runner on the respective teams.’
      • ‘He had a chance to break the tie.’
      • ‘She was able to make good on a pass from her linemate to break the scoreless tie.’
      • ‘Both teams have two points each and are hungry for the additional two points to break the tie.’
      • ‘If a tie still exists, the players continue playing from their reserves until the tie is broken.’
    6. 2.6 Disconnect or interrupt (an electrical circuit).
      • ‘A circuit breaker has a mechanism for automatically breaking an electrical circuit.’
      • ‘If either voltage or current is too big you could break the circuit.’
      • ‘By bouncing, the reed breaks an electrical circuit.’
      • ‘A switch works by breaking the circuit, which stops the current.’
    7. 2.7 Stop oneself from engaging in (a habitual practice).
      • ‘In the course of the 1980s, the recognition of nicotine addiction offered an explanation of the difficulty experienced by some in breaking the smoking habit.’
      • ‘It took a long time - and a lot of support - for him to break his habit, and he still doesn't feel like the person he was.’
      • ‘I never managed to break the teenage habit of jiggling my legs and fidgeting when I have to sit still for a long time.’
      • ‘Imagine how hard it must be to break a habit that's lasted ten years.’
      • ‘You are attempting something that is inherently very difficult: breaking old habits.’
      • ‘Here are some methods for breaking old habits and creating new, desirable ones.’
      • ‘The addictions would probably be easier to break once she began to deal with what had happened to her.’
      • ‘I suggest you pick a few of your unhealthy eating habits, and give yourself a month to work on breaking those habits.’
      • ‘So don't feel guilty if your new habits are broken at certain times.’
      • ‘Really wanting to break this bad habit is the first step to stopping.’
      • ‘We would have to break old habits that perhaps were once useful, but don't serve their purpose anymore.’
      • ‘Also, of course, there is the reality that 20 or 30 years of habit are not broken in a fortnight.’
      • ‘If you spot smoking triggers write down how you could deal with them if you were to stop smoking - a good way to break a habit is to replace it with a new one.’
      • ‘How do you break habits when you're not as confident in the new methods, or at least in your skill with using them?’
      • ‘Honestly, a course isn't going to help break the bad habits that caused the problem in the first place.’
      • ‘Old habits are hard to break.’
      • ‘She shrugged it off and told herself it would take some time to break her old habits.’
      • ‘The Canadian Cancer Society is urging smokers trying to quit to plan out how they are going to break their habit.’
      • ‘For adults over 25, many doctors regard it as too late to break their eating habits and make them fit and lean again.’
      • ‘The pamphlet offered nothing about breaking habits.’
      give up, relinquish, drop, get out of
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    8. 2.8 Surpass (a record)
      ‘the movie broke box-office records’
      • ‘There have been some interesting results with long standing records being broken.’
      • ‘This film broke box office attendance records in Cuba and achieved world-wide acclaim.’
      • ‘Thereafter, I broke the lap record five times and still only finished fourth, so that demonstrates what small margins you are operating within.’
      • ‘The films, too, have proved a hit with an older audience, breaking box-office records for a foreign film.’
      • ‘Irish cinema-goers are breaking box-office records, according to new research.’
      • ‘She broke her own record of 4.89 m which she set in Birmingham on Sunday.’
      • ‘It broke the previous record for the world's largest choir last Christmas with 6,846 young voices at the Manchester Evening News Arena.’
      • ‘He broke the lap record four times, the first coming in lap one from a standing start, the second in lap two.’
      • ‘He has broken every goalscoring record there has ever been.’
      • ‘He broke the club's try-scoring record last season but has been sidelined this term after undergoing a knee reconstruction.’
      • ‘The unbeatable women's softball team won a third straight gold, breaking 18 Olympic records in the process.’
      • ‘The film broke box-office records and won seven Academy Awards.’
      • ‘A fitness fanatic has broken the world record for the most chin-ups done in one hour.’
      • ‘He has already said he will try to break the world record.’
      • ‘She holds the trump card after breaking the world record three times this year.’
      • ‘People forget that this team broke all sorts of try-scoring records.’
      • ‘He got into the final with an Olympic record, and then broke the Olympic record again to get the gold medal.’
      • ‘When an athlete breaks a world record, the previous record-holder's title is eclipsed.’
      • ‘I know I could have done 100 mph, but I have broken the record and that is the most important thing.’
      • ‘He has broken the record for most expensive film three times, but has always managed to produce interesting films that have made money.’
      exceed, surpass, beat, better, cap, top, trump, outdo, outstrip, go beyond, eclipse, put in the shade
      View synonyms
  • 3with object Fail to observe (a law, regulation, or agreement)

    ‘the district attorney says she will prosecute retailers who break the law’
    ‘a legally binding contract that can only be broken by mutual consent’
    • ‘Do you regularly break the rules or minor laws rather than put up with the frustration of obeying them?’
    • ‘This past summer, the legislature broke the agreement.’
    • ‘Traders who break the law by selling to children risk a £5,000 fine and six months imprisonment.’
    • ‘The authorities will be able to deport a harmless Egyptian cabbie who came to Britain as an economic migrant, for breaking immigration rules.’
    • ‘At an emotional news conference, members of the women's eight apologised for breaking national Olympic rules and expressed regret at condemning their team mate.’
    • ‘The company failed to meet deadline requirements and broke the agreements.’
    • ‘If the country were a separate member of the European Union, it would be facing certain prosecution for breaking environmental law.’
    • ‘He said he believed it was impossible to do the journey in under 10 hours unless he broke the speed limit.’
    • ‘What the judges, politicians and others concerned need to remember is a burglar is breaking the law and must be prosecuted.’
    • ‘Agreements are broken, witnesses held in contempt, there is respect for no one.’
    • ‘They're certainly breaking their contractual agreement with the bank by participating in these rebate schemes.’
    • ‘It seems there's little incentive to adhere to the law, especially when breaking the rules makes such good business sense.’
    • ‘I observe how society keeps breaking the rules.’
    • ‘These players are breaking the rules.’
    • ‘‘Many doctors did not realise they were breaking the law by failing to seek the consent of relatives,’ he reported.’
    • ‘And police are urging people to call them if they suspect someone is regularly breaking the law by drink-driving.’
    • ‘Police say that anyone caught breaking the law could be liable for prosecution or given an official warning.’
    • ‘He walked free from court after a jury cleared him of breaking the Official Secrets Act.’
    • ‘I turn now to the matter of fines for such things as wilful desertion, breaking lease, breaking the agreement, or failing to attend the tribunal or mediation.’
    • ‘Clubs could choose to terminate contracts, if players break them.’
    contravene, violate, fail to comply with, fail to observe, disobey, infringe, breach, commit a breach of, transgress against
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 Fail to continue with (a self-imposed discipline)
      ‘diets started without preparation are broken all the time’
      • ‘She resists the urge to break her diet.’
      • ‘I didn't realize Vikki wasn't willing to break her healthy habits and was unable to convince her to share fish 'n chips with me.’
      • ‘It is no wonder that winter time is when most people break their exercise routines, start unhealthy eating habits and gain weight.’
  • 4with object Crush the emotional strength, spirit, or resistance of.

    ‘the idea was to better the prisoners, not to break them’
    • ‘She was going to prove he hadn't broken her spirit.’
    • ‘The rest of us suffer while they try to break our spirits and brainwash us.’
    • ‘After months with no sales, his spirit was broken and he gave up.’
    • ‘Anne's spirit could not be broken.’
    • ‘These were trials that would have broken the spirit of most people.’
    • ‘There is little that life can throw at him which can break his spirit.’
    • ‘You've stolen his dignity, shattered his emotions and broken his spirit, how much more do you want?’
    • ‘However you see the work, its implication is that the spirit cannot be broken.’
    • ‘Never ridicule a woman - it breaks her spirit and cuts her efficiency.’
    • ‘While they were successful in obtaining Rich's resignation, they could not break his spirit.’
    • ‘They're breaking them, their spirit, their minds, their psyche.’
    • ‘If they thought that would break my spirit, they got it wrong.’
    • ‘But it stands to reason that if your spirit is broken by misery and the side effects of treatment, then you will not do well.’
    • ‘And since I was working with the disabled before the accident, I knew what kind of a life was in store for me ahead, which broke my spirit.’
    • ‘You broke my heart much like you broke the spirits of your people.’
    • ‘When I look at her I just think that at some point her spirit was broken and then, well, this is what became of her.’
    • ‘They remember being kept desperately hungry all the time, as part of a ploy to break their spirits.’
    • ‘Such privations by no means broke the spirit of the people.’
    • ‘She had seen many things there that broke her spirit and took away her faith in humanity, but knew that there was still good left in the world.’
    • ‘I write this letter as a mother, a mother whose spirit is broken, a mother who has to keep her child in the house in fear of losing her.’
    1. 4.1no object (of a person's emotional strength) give way.
      ‘her self-control finally broke’
      • ‘The words died on her tongue, and all of her well-trained control broke.’
      • ‘Once in his room, Tony's fragile control broke, tears quickly blinding him.’
      • ‘The phone clicked back into place as Jackie crumpled onto the floor, her composure finally breaking.’
      • ‘Her control broke and she hit him hard across the face.’
      give way, collapse, crack, be overcome, give in, cave in, yield, crumple, go to pieces
      View synonyms
    2. 4.2 Destroy the power of (a movement or organization).
      • ‘The bourgeoisie are agreed that the only solution is a dictatorship that crushes and breaks the workers' movement.’
      • ‘Government indifference and racist violence did not break the movement - in fact it radicalised it.’
      • ‘True, he broke the power of the trade unions but the result was near total economic collapse.’
      • ‘They know that this could break the movement and we are afraid that it will work.’
      • ‘It was also viewed by its architects as a way to break the power of the elite, who are still very much in control.’
      destroy, crush, smash, quash, defeat, vanquish, overcome, overpower, overwhelm, cripple, bring someone to their knees
      View synonyms
    3. 4.3 Destroy the effectiveness of (a strike), typically by bringing in other people to replace the striking workers.
      • ‘The company has turned to the state government and courts to help break the strike.’
      • ‘How dare you support a union that helped to break a strike?’
      • ‘In an attempt to break the strike, the airlines flew in baggage-handling personnel from abroad.’
      • ‘On January 3 management sent out more than 200 dismissal notices in an attempt to break the strike.’
      • ‘Clearly this was a crude attempt to break the strike.’
      • ‘In El Salvador riot police broke a medical workers strike by occupying clinics in February.’
      • ‘Strikers were disgusted to hear that journalists were being paid £100 per day extra to break the strike.’
      • ‘He betrayed his former socialist beliefs by breaking a strike of railwaymen in 1910.’
      • ‘Worse still, soldiers were used to break strikes: workers and peasants were set to fight one another in the clothes of striker and soldier.’
      • ‘The council is attempting to break the strike by opening three out of seven libraries with casual staff.’
      • ‘During the strike workers condemned management appeals to private sector workers to break the strike.’
      • ‘The school management has drawn up plans to try to break Thursday's strike by bringing in supply teachers.’
      • ‘It was also utilised to break strikes by workers agitating for better working conditions and wages.’
      • ‘A convoy of police cars escorted trucks and vans full of workers sent by other apple growers to break the strike.’
      • ‘The service drafted in prison officers to work in kitchens in an attempt to break the strike.’
      • ‘That night the cabinet rounded up the strike leaders and flooded Glasgow with tanks and trainloads of troops to break the strike.’
      • ‘A lot of friendships were broken through people breaking the strike.’
      • ‘Workers established the picket in order to prevent the company breaking the strike with replacement drivers.’
      • ‘The union claims that management has begun recruiting casual workers to break the strike.’
      • ‘Management attempted to use 40 workers brought over from Holland last week to break the strike.’
    4. 4.4 Tame or train (a horse).
      • ‘He ‘officially’ started training horses for money when he was 13 years old, breaking colts for the locals.’
      • ‘As a boy, when he wasn't chopping firewood, breaking broncs or working a local ranch, he was drawing.’
      • ‘I worked with horses, broke the young ones, rode in the rodeos.’
      • ‘He must use at least as much intelligence and energy in bringing her to trust him, and to accept the bargain he offers, as he would in breaking a horse.’
      • ‘He broke the American horses at the Texas training facility owned by his family.’
      • ‘One day, when Alexander was a boy, his father and some of his companions were trying to break a horse.’
      • ‘He was out on the range breaking a horse when he caught sight of the lone rider.’
      • ‘Many, many trainers have tried to break this horse, and have not succeeded.’
      • ‘You can't break a colt merely by observing general principles.’
      • ‘Who ever heard of a young woman breaking stallions?’
      • ‘It felt good to be able to go out and do a hard day's physical labor of chasing stray cattle, driving into town to collect mail and supplies or breaking horses.’
      • ‘His talent for breaking horses soon earned him the name The Breaker.’
      • ‘Father went to work for a short time breaking horses for the owner of a livery stable, who was doing a big business locating for homesteaders.’
      • ‘When you set about breaking a young horse, the first thing you have to do is break him to the halter so that he learns to respect it and understand that he cannot get away.’
      • ‘They all knew how to ride but when it came to breaking horses and rounding up the herds the women had nothing to do with it.’
      • ‘He broke over 400 horses ranging from two to eight years olds.’
      • ‘He still spends a full day in the saddle, breaking his own horses, of course.’
      • ‘He was soon working in the north shearing and breaking horses.’
      • ‘He was also skilled at breaking horses and racing them.’
      • ‘He remembered the proud look on his son's face as he broke the horses others said couldn't be ridden.’
  • 5no object (of the weather) change suddenly.

    ‘the weather broke and thunder rumbled through a leaden sky’
    • ‘The weather broke on 3 September, and clouds of dust were turned into glutinous mud.’
    • ‘The hot spell had broken and now the weather was bearable again.’
    • ‘The drought has broken again, just when everyone wondered if it ever would.’
    • ‘And in the meantime the drought has broken and the farmers are clamouring for seed so they can get a crop.’
    • ‘The main reason for the haste was the weather which could have broken at any time bringing all haulage work on the soft bog to an end.’
    • ‘He said he was not worried about the weekend's sunny weather breaking as there was plenty of room to shelter from showers in the stands.’
    • ‘This great weather is sure to break soon so lets all enjoy it while it lasts.’
    • ‘When the weather broke, a strong, cooling wind came up, and Dolly and I were much more comfortable than of late.’
    • ‘The heatwave has broken, the temperature has dropped, the sun has clouded over and the pavements are wet.’
    • ‘The heatwave broke and it was gorgeous running weather this morning.’
    • ‘The hot weather has definitely broken and it's jumpers before sunset, but only just before.’
    • ‘Impatiently we wait for the weather to break, for we know all too well how much work needs to be done.’
    • ‘That meant withholding some of the farmers' irrigation water and sending it downriver - at least until the drought broke.’
    • ‘Fearing a curse, the townspeople fled in terror as soon as the weather broke.’
    • ‘The rain breaks long enough for me to dash to the supermarket.’
    • ‘This morning, in Winchester, the dry spell broke and there was rain.’
    • ‘Soon afterward, the drought broke and the area teemed once more with life.’
    • ‘Even so, I managed to do it, even as the first rains of the season broke across the South Bay.’
    • ‘If the drought has now broken, why are you predicting this food crisis will last until April?’
    • ‘This drought broke emphatically in February 1973, with exceptional rainfall over South Australia and the eastern states.’
    change, undergo a change, alter, shift, metamorphose
    View synonyms
    1. 5.1 (of a storm) begin violently.
      • ‘People walked by on the sidewalks, running errands, trying to get home before the storm broke.’
      • ‘During the night a storm broke, and the bungalow leaked badly.’
      • ‘Looking down from the mouth of the pass, I could see now that a lot of our members wouldn't make it before the storm broke.’
      • ‘On the way to the airport, a colossal thunderstorm broke.’
      • ‘They left and soon after the storm broke.’
      • ‘The storm broke as she arrived at the house, and the sudden downpour soaked her between the taxi and the front door.’
      • ‘As he climbed into his campaign bus a thunderstorm broke over the city.’
      • ‘The storm broke the next morning.’
      • ‘The sudden thunderstorm broke at approximately 4.30 pm caused flooding of up to two feet in some areas.’
      • ‘Whales were almost completely absent the day before a storm broke, and the numbers migrating slowly increased once it was over.’
      • ‘On August 20 a terrific hurricane broke over the mountains.’
      • ‘As soon as they had left the field, the storm broke and there was torrential rain.’
      • ‘While we were dining in the hotel's restaurant the usual evening thunderstorm broke, along with a blinding downpour.’
      • ‘Just after I left the site a huge thunderstorm broke over Greensboro which continued through the dusk.’
      • ‘But just as the Queen was about to arrive in her carriage a thunderstorm broke, forcing everyone to run for cover.’
      • ‘A storm broke, sending them home early, but they got caught crossing a rapidly rising creek.’
      • ‘As I headed toward the forest, a tremendous thunderstorm broke.’
      • ‘A mild thunderstorm has just broken out over west London, minutes after I got home.’
      • ‘However, at that same moment, a thunderstorm broke loose around them.’
      • ‘A huge thunderstorm broke over St. George's early this morning.’
    2. 5.2 (of dawn or day) begin with the sun rising.
      ‘dawn was just breaking’
      • ‘I was woken by dawn breaking.’
      • ‘The journey down wasn't too bad and I only started to notice the traffic as I crossed the Severn Bridge as dawn was breaking.’
      • ‘Daylight began to break, as tired pastel rays of sunlight fell upon Anna's face.’
      • ‘Police cordoned off the area overnight and as dawn broke, forensic investigations began at the crime scene.’
      • ‘Dawn was breaking, and the pale pink sunrise brushed its fingers of light over everything.’
      • ‘When dawn broke, he rose stiffly, and stretched his aching limbs.’
      • ‘As day broke, the eyes of news outlets were focused on New Orleans, the biggest city threatened by the storm and the city with the biggest potential for disaster.’
      • ‘When day broke, the summer dawn could not penetrate the leaden gloom above the city.’
      • ‘As day broke, the sun came out, and so did the insects.’
      • ‘By the time dawn broke over the notorious stretch of the Lancashire coast any chance of survival had ebbed away for those still out at sea.’
      • ‘Dawn broke and weak light filtered over the horizon.’
      • ‘Once I witnessed the dawn breaking as I went out to check a sickly lamb.’
      • ‘Birds started singing because they thought dawn had broken.’
      • ‘Dawn was breaking as Marie rose from her first restful night's sleep in two weeks.’
      • ‘Dawn was a few hours away but when the day broke he knew his cover wouldn't last for long.’
      • ‘Seagulls from Cork harbour were flying overhead and the dawn was breaking.’
      • ‘When dawn began to break, I guarded the controls and let my pilot continue with the approach.’
      • ‘Numerous teams of volunteers set off armed with litter-pickers and bags as dawn was breaking.’
      • ‘Dawn began to break as we approached Cape May, New Jersey, and soon the sun was up.’
      • ‘Americans will be at their desks on Christmas Eve and back, as ever, when dawn breaks on Boxing Day.’
      dawn, begin, start, come into being, come forth, emerge, appear
      View synonyms
    3. 5.3 (of clouds) move apart and begin to disperse.
      • ‘The grey, looming clouds began to break apart and the blue sky of winter slowly began to show.’
      • ‘Despite my earlier reluctance to face the wintry conditions, it was curiously exhilarating to battle through the snowdrifts and clouds and arrive by the summit just as the clouds broke.’
      • ‘It was a full moon and we were probably spotted when the clouds broke.’
      • ‘As we talked, the clouds started to break for the first time.’
      • ‘The clouds had broken and a corner of blue sky was peeping out towards the west.’
      • ‘Glancing through the window he saw the cloud breaking and above he could make out the faint glimmer of stars.’
      • ‘The rain had stopped and the clouds broke to let a Sunday afternoon sun out.’
      • ‘However at 3:15 pm the clouds finally broke and he was allowed half an hour of uninterrupted viewing before sunset.’
      • ‘The clouds broke, and the fair moon shone through.’
      • ‘It rained and snowed the whole next day, but as night set in, the clouds began to break.’
      • ‘These build and swell into clouds, suddenly breaking apart and dispersing unexpectedly.’
      • ‘Once the fog broke and he could see the harbor stretching out in front of him he turned left and peered into the windows of the first bar he came upon.’
      • ‘The clouds are breaking and it's time for me to go flying.’
      • ‘But when Ronnie came forward, the clouds broke and the sun came out.’
      • ‘In the early afternoon, the clouds broke and the sun blazed.’
      • ‘In all the time we've lived here, not once has the cloud cover broken.’
      • ‘The clouds broke over the vast ranch lands of the Wet Valley.’
      • ‘At last, below him the clouds broke and he could see where he came from.’
      • ‘The clouds broke apart and never dropped their rain.’
      • ‘Every now and then the fog would break for a moment, exposing the mountain range looming in the distance.’
    4. 5.4 (of waves) curl over and dissolve into foam.
      ‘the Caribbean sea breaking gently on the shore’
      • ‘His pace was brisk and he did not seem to appreciate the music of the sea waves breaking against the parapet.’
      • ‘They could see huge waves breaking over the main harbour and tossing ships about like tiny corks.’
      • ‘It is void of any traffic at this hour, with - the waves out there have begun to break further and further out.’
      • ‘In creative visualization, the meditator forms a mental picture that conveys relaxation, such as waves breaking gently on the sand.’
      • ‘The waves sparkled as they broke against the sea wall.’
      • ‘Turning his face towards the sea, he watched the low waves breaking on the sea wall.’
      • ‘The image most people have of a tsunami is a large, steep wave breaking on the shore.’
      • ‘As each wave breaks over the sand, it brings in a fresh cargo of wriggling fish to the shore.’
      • ‘We were told that in the very worst weather, the waves broke over the dunes and splashed the windows.’
      • ‘Waves broke against the dark rocks to her left, and foamed and swirled like a jacuzzi.’
      • ‘We were standing near the beach watching the embers of someone else's fire and listening to waves break on the shingle.’
      • ‘Even in calm seas, the waves breaking over a reef are dangerous.’
      • ‘These waves break far from the shore, and the surf gently rolls over the front of the wave.’
      • ‘It's like going out into the sea and letting the waves break over you.’
      • ‘The waves break on the rocky shoreline as the tide comes in.’
      • ‘The wave breaks over my head, but I'm still upright.’
      • ‘It is a bit windy but the waves are breaking nicely.’
      • ‘Standing on the cliff, you see the waves breaking at the shore down below.’
      • ‘The beach is wide and large and the waves break far out.’
      • ‘Waves broke constantly over the deck, washing whole groups of terrified passengers overboard.’
      crash, dash, beat, pound, lash
      View synonyms
    5. 5.5 (of the voice) falter and change tone, due to emotion.
      ‘her voice broke as she relived the experience’
      • ‘As she looked at her husband, her voice broke and the tears came.’
      • ‘Her voice broke despairingly, as the depression of the last few days threatened to overwhelm her again.’
      • ‘His voice broke slightly as he said this and he cleared his throat.’
      • ‘Her mother's voice broke helplessly, and she blinked rapidly, pulling her daughter in for a tight embrace.’
      • ‘Here, my voice broke as I let my emotions through for the first time in a year.’
      • ‘Her voice broke and she looked away angrily as tears filled her eyes.’
      • ‘Her voice trembled and broke at times, but she consistently looked upon Angie's face with eagerness.’
      • ‘‘It's all right, I forgive you… I forgive you,’ he said, his voice breaking.’
      • ‘She'd called me up, her voice breaking and shaking, I could tell she was hurt.’
      • ‘Her voice broke and she struggled to get it back.’
      • ‘At this, her voice broke, and tears streamed down her face.’
      • ‘Mary's voice broke and she rested her forehead against her hands again.’
      • ‘Rebecca's voice broke and her sobs took place of her voice.’
      • ‘Her voice broke and she buried her face in her hands, the memories that seemed to have been lost for some time finally made themselves known in her mind.’
      • ‘His voice broke as he fought back emotions to tell an Old Bailey jury of the boy's last words.’
      • ‘Her voice broke as she said this, and she blinked.’
      • ‘At that point her voice broke and her emotions took control.’
      • ‘Alex's voice broke and his hand's shook as he stood up.’
      • ‘His voice broke and he put his face in his hands and sobbed uncontrollably.’
      • ‘‘It's all right, sweetheart,’ he murmured, his voice breaking slightly as his own eyes filled up with tears.’
      falter, quaver, quiver, tremble, shake
      View synonyms
    6. 5.6 (of a boy's voice) change in tone and register at puberty.
      • ‘There, especially after his voice broke and shattered his hopes of a singing career, he knocked on every door he could find in a bid to get powerful patrons.’
      • ‘What I didn't reckon on was that this hormonal upheaval was also going to result in my voice breaking.’
      • ‘And trust me, even now that his voice has broken he's still capable of making busy note runs sound simple and gorgeous.’
      • ‘He turned professional at the age of 12 but had to ‘retire’ when his voice broke at 16.’
      • ‘He was now 14, and his voice was breaking.’
    7. 5.7Phonetics (of a vowel) develop into a diphthong, under the influence of an adjacent sound.
      ‘breaking due to a following r or h’
      • ‘In many (but not all) accents of English, a similar breaking happens to tense vowels before l.’
      • ‘Breaking of a short vowel gives a short diphthong.’
      • ‘There is a considerable variation in breaking between different dialects and different generations of speakers.’
    8. 5.8 (of prices on the stock exchange) fall sharply.
      • ‘If price breaks above the high, a bullish bias is adopted.’
      • ‘If there is enough resistance to stop prices from breaking above this line, do not enter long positions.’
      • ‘What traders want to confirm is that the price is indeed falling and will break back through the upper trendline.’
      • ‘The latest bear market is now in its ninth week, while the Dow has broken well below its post-11 September trough.’
    9. 5.9 Make the first stroke at the beginning of a game of billiards, pool, or snooker.
  • 6no object (of news or a scandal) suddenly become public.

    ‘since the news broke I've received thousands of wonderful letters’
    • ‘Anyone who was around at that time but not directly involved in the madness can remember where they were and what they were doing when the shocking news broke.’
    • ‘Later, when the tragic news broke, we agreed to put on the fundraising event.’
    • ‘When the revelations regarding his alleged misconduct broke, the paper clearly felt itself under immense pressure.’
    • ‘I am angrier today than I was when this scandal broke.’
    • ‘When news of the riots broke, there was obviously significant coverage given to the story by UK broadcast media.’
    • ‘When the news broke on Wednesday, the Treasury took refuge in the fact that it was budget day to excuse the fact that it had nothing to say.’
    • ‘Indeed, the Presidential Palace has remained notably tight-lipped since the scandal broke.’
    • ‘Some of the women were released after the scandal broke.’
    • ‘Once the news broke, emails and phone calls started pouring in from well-wishers.’
    • ‘The news broke that London would host the Olympic Games.’
    • ‘Yet from the moment the story broke every paper seems to be finding multiple sources who are willing to talk freely about minute details of the case.’
    • ‘After the story broke, leading papers including the New York Times picked it up.’
    • ‘At home in Harrogate, Leon's mother watched as news of the disaster broke, knowing of her son's plan to dive on Boxing Day.’
    • ‘A federal investigator was on campus within 48 hours after news broke about the scandal.’
    • ‘News of the latest scandal broke on Sunday, just weeks after South Africa won the right to stage the 2010 soccer World Cup.’
    • ‘Members of the club's senior team were on route to Athenry for the match when news of the tragedy broke.’
    • ‘That morning a story had broken in the papers that made the former Premier the journalistic prey of the day.’
    • ‘‘It's amazing that until this news broke there was no talk about the Olympic Games,’ he said.’
    • ‘Since news of the scandal broke, the company has been forced to fire two of its executives and to demand the resignation of its chairman.’
    • ‘He is said to have been regularly in tears since news of the scandal broke.’
    erupt, burst out, break out
    View synonyms
    1. 6.1break something to someonewith object Make bad news known to someone.
      • ‘Then when the time was right, we broke the news to them, and carefully monitored the response over several days.’
      • ‘When he returned to Germany for the Christmas holiday, he broke the news to her that he had been asked to stay for another two-and-a-half years.’
      • ‘The board's chief executive broke the news to staff in on Tuesday morning.’
      • ‘It was only then that Elaine broke the news to her parents and her sisters and brothers.’
      • ‘Her husband broke the news to her, and the couple celebrated by putting the kettle on and sitting down with a cup of tea.’
      • ‘When the chaps emerged from their meeting, I broke the news to them.’
      • ‘She broke the news to them last Monday in a meeting with the entire team.’
      • ‘I was just about to break the terrible news to her when her cat strolled casually around the corner of the house.’
      • ‘But later that evening the police came and broke the bad news to him, he said.’
      • ‘When we broke the news to her mother, she said her daughter would never do something like that.’
      • ‘He was devastated when a doctor first broke the news to him.’
      • ‘In an interview, she said doctors broke the news to them last week that their two-month-old tot Harvey had been born with a rare condition that means he will face a lifetime of darkness.’
      • ‘Managers broke the news to staff on Monday afternoon, hours after drivers were ordered not to deliver goods until cash on previous orders was collected.’
      • ‘Anyhow, I broke the news to him in a very compassionate way, and gave him whatever counselling I could.’
      • ‘She said it had been very emotional when they broke the news to residents on Tuesday.’
      • ‘Alan eventually broke the news to her over a cup of coffee when they got home.’
      • ‘Police broke the news to her father and mother today.’
      • ‘Referring to fatal accidents Chief Supt Carey added: ‘I have dealt with several fatal accidents and nobody can imagine what it is like having to break such terrible news to a family.’’
      • ‘One day his brother came and broke the news to her, but it took a few days to sink in.’
      • ‘Bosses broke the news to workers at a meeting for all 500 employees last night.’
      reveal, disclose, divulge, let out
      View synonyms
  • 7no object, with adverbial (chiefly of an attacking player or team, or of a military force) make a rush or dash in a particular direction.

    ‘the flight broke to the right and formed a defensive circle’
    • ‘Then Campbell scored a last-minute winner that wasn't allowed and was wheeling away in celebration when they broke upfield.’
    • ‘Steeton proved to be a very good counter attacking team and were at their most dangerous when breaking from their own penalty area.’
    • ‘Six riders broke from a lead group of 15 and worked well together to maintain a healthy advantage going into the run.’
    • ‘They win it back and again try to break quickly.’
    • ‘Three riders broke clear on the fifth lap of the second event.’
    • ‘The home side broke quickly from defence and took the lead in the 33rd minute.’
    • ‘He broke clear to score his 27th goal of the season and wrap up the win.’
    • ‘This inspirational player broke round the blind side and was stopped just short of the try line.’
    • ‘He then broke and off-loaded to Moran to go in under the posts.’
    • ‘He broke from the halfway line but held onto the ball too long with support on hand.’
    • ‘Two riders broke clear with a 20 second lead.’
    • ‘He broke forwards again to force home the rebound.’
    • ‘They broke quickly after clearing a corner.’
    • ‘From the start the pace was on with four competitors breaking clear of the pack and setting a blistering pace.’
    • ‘She broke from deep down the right wing and shot wide.’
    • ‘They broke quickly but Morgan's drive rattled the post.’
    • ‘Neville ran up and down the wing like a teenager, always giving an option and ready to break past the full-back.’
    • ‘The outlet player passes to a lane player who is breaking to the basket, and makes a lay-up.’
    • ‘A couple of minutes later and the home side broke quickly from a free-kick into their own box.’
    • ‘Full back Tony Simpson broke well down the right wing, and passed inside to Michael Carr.’
    1. 7.1 (of a pitched baseball) curve or drop on its way toward the batter.
      • ‘His two breaking pitches were excellent, though, and his control was superb.’
      • ‘His breaking pitches lacked movement, and his fastball, one of his saving graces in the fourth game, seemed to have departed him.’
      • ‘Sheets has a mid-90s fastball, a curve that breaks like a Whiffleball in a headwind and a changeup that is a work-in-progress.’
      • ‘They say his fastball was 88-90 mph and his curveball was breaking sharply.’
      • ‘He can really handle the bat including breaking pitches.’
      • ‘It was his missing slider, which usually looks like a fastball for a strike until it breaks toward a righthander's shoetops.’
      • ‘He finished strong in 2000, regaining the touch on his breaking pitches toward the end of the season.’
      • ‘His main breaking pitch is a slider, but he mixes in a curveball on occasion.’
      • ‘He only throws two pitches, a big breaking pitch and a bigger sinking fastball.’
      • ‘Throughout most of his career, breaking pitches had troubled the big-swinging Howard.’
      • ‘When he bores fastballs and sharp breaking pitches into the hands of righthanders, they have trouble getting around on them, even if they see them longer.’
      • ‘Every home run I've seen has been on a fastball, and I've seen very few base hits off of good breaking pitches.’
      • ‘Neither looked fantastic, but mid-90s fastballs and jaw-dropping breaking pitches were quite prevalent.’
      • ‘Hitters didn't have to adjust to swing at mid-80s fastballs, breaking pitches and splitters.’
      • ‘Most hitters prefer to stand deep in the batter's box, giving them an extra split-second to hit the fastball and recognize breaking pitches.’
      • ‘But the Canadian showed very solid breaking pitches, which he used often with two-strike counts.’
      • ‘The angle of the wrist of the pitching hand in the glove can be a giveaway to a fastball or breaking pitch.’
      • ‘He often uses it to get ahead of hitters 0-2 and then comes with a curveball that breaks sharply downward.’
      • ‘While his fastball is in the low 90s, it's his various breaking pitches that have made Kim successful.’
      • ‘Unlike some minor league power hitters who struggle with major league curveballs, Ortiz can hit breaking pitches as well as fastballs.’
    2. 7.2 (of a bowled cricket ball) change direction on bouncing, due to spin.
      • ‘This is done by twisting the wrist at the moment of delivery so that the ball breaks when it strikes with the pitch.’
      • ‘How much the ball breaks will often depend on the kind of pitch it is.’
      • ‘Will there emerge a spinner who breaks the ball so sharply that he needs no fielders on one side of the wicket?’
    3. 7.3 (of a ball) rebound unpredictably.
      ‘the ball broke to Craig but his shot rebounded from the post’
      • ‘The ball broke to him on the right of the box.’
      • ‘The ball breaks to Owen on the left of the Argentinian box.’
      • ‘From a Korean free-kick on the right, the ball breaks to Lee on the edge of the box.’
      • ‘The ball broke among a swarm of backs and forwards.’
      • ‘He finished in style when the ball broke to him.’

noun

  • 1An interruption of continuity or uniformity.

    ‘the magazine has been published without a break since 1950’
    • ‘He was educated in local schools with intermittent breaks.’
    • ‘It will be the 35th anniversary of the event being revived after a break of several years.’
    • ‘You may be heading for mountains or beaches or an amusement park but you want to have a break from the ordinary grind of life.’
    • ‘She was soon put under house arrest, where she has remained, with a few breaks, ever since.’
    • ‘One table had an older family, taking a break from cooking at home.’
    • ‘It's just never been easy, and I've been bound to this child for six months without any break.’
    • ‘For some guys, it's also a nice break from having to take the lead.’
    • ‘Because of their short durations, the motor tests were not interrupted by breaks.’
    • ‘The diesel service had the advantage of speedier and more frequent runs, and allowed running for long periods without immediate breaks for servicing.’
    • ‘As a break from my habitual states of enthusiasm, excitement, anger or inertia, I decided to attempt an intellectual exercise.’
    • ‘After a three-year break they decided to put this popular event back on the track!’
    • ‘It also gives people a break from the grinding chores of daily life.’
    • ‘It can be a positive thing - adrenaline helps us get things done - but not if it continues without a break.’
    • ‘This is an ideal way to spend a day with a friend, a family member or indeed with someone who would just appreciate a break from routine.’
    • ‘And the striker will be particularly keen to avoid any breaks from first team action.’
    • ‘Repaving work that has so far cost £2.2m is restarting following a break over the Christmas period.’
    • ‘I started working in 1959 at the age of 16 and have done so continuously without a break.’
    • ‘To provide a break from their daily routine, they are taken for a visit to the zoo, park, coconut farms and theme parks.’
    • ‘After a break of several months, he tried to ride a bike again and realised how unfit he was.’
    • ‘I had worked on the story over a period of several months with several long breaks.’
    interruption, interval, gap, hiatus, lapse of time, lacuna
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An act of separating oneself from a state of affairs.
      ‘a break with the past’
      • ‘We may need to make a break with the past and with past evidence.’
      • ‘Since this break from the rules and formalities of European culture, Americans have never looked back.’
      • ‘This represented a break with 1900 years of complete Christian consensus.’
      • ‘All in all, his break from his instrumental past proves moving and well judged.’
      • ‘The filmmakers were making a break from the ironclad Soviet cinematic ideology.’
      • ‘In a break with tradition, the Welsh Rugby Union has decided to make tickets for Six Nations matches available to the general public via their internet site.’
    2. 1.2 A change in the weather.
      ‘a week or so may pass without a break in the weather’
      • ‘After a week of waiting, there was a break in the weather.’
      • ‘After two very wet months will we get a break in the bad weather?’
      • ‘Everywhere, the streets were filled with people, enjoying — at last — a break in the rain.’
      • ‘The weather remained gloomy, with small breaks of sunshine.’
      change, alteration, variation
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3with modifier A change of line, paragraph, or page.
      ‘dotted lines on the screen show page breaks’
      • ‘Blank verse like this is like tennis without the net; it is prose with line breaks.’
      • ‘Paragraph breaks have been inserted for clarity’
      • ‘The line length gives some formatting problems, requiring the use of a small typeface if there are to be no unplanned line breaks.’
      • ‘How many page breaks can exist in a chapter?’
      • ‘Her line breaks are uniquely hers, beautifully jolting without any winking self-congratulation.’
      • ‘In particular, he had to decide how to sequence the stories and ads on any given page, and when to put in line breaks.’
      • ‘It should be in a very readable state, with page breaks and titles for each page.’
      • ‘We removed the spaces between words and inserted arbitrary line breaks.’
      • ‘Place the text description first, followed by a line break, and then the select menu.’
      • ‘He has made a fairly close, but not exact, approximation of page breaks, and preserved the numbering system fairly well.’
      • ‘As well as the titles I have cut out a couple of line breaks, it's an attempt to make it all look a little better, I'll reserve judgement for now, things could change back.’
      • ‘When it works, line breaks will be changed into paragraphs, and links will be allowed in comments.’
      • ‘His prose, rich in dialect and at times fragmented into poetic line breaks, is well worth the time required to fully comprehend its rhythms.’
      • ‘Sorry if my transitions between page breaks aren't very orderly.’
      • ‘WordPerfect allows you to mark a block of text as not permitted to be interrupted by a page break.’
      • ‘They also need to sort out the length of their paragraphs and proof reading generally, this article in particular gave me a migraine with its lack of line breaks.’
      • ‘The column is a little hard to read since the Times website has inexplicably removed all the paragraph breaks, but it's worth plowing through anyway.’
      • ‘A concise and true statement for a book largely filled with poems that read more like essays with poetic line breaks.’
      • ‘Rather than slow down the reading pace, the sound shape of the poem intensifies the oral density of each line, somehow nearly erasing the line breaks.’
      • ‘The ‘preview’ mode can't cope with line breaks; however, line breaks do appear correctly after the comment has been published.’
    4. 1.4 A change of tone in the voice due to emotion.
      ‘there was a break in her voice now’
      • ‘There was a break in his voice when he bade farewell to the reporters.’
      • ‘I picked up on the urgency in her voice, detecting emotional breaks.’
      • ‘There was a break in her voice as if she were going to burst out crying.’
    5. 1.5 An interruption in an electrical circuit.
      • ‘A dead light-bulb is a break in the circuit, so that will also stop the current.’
      • ‘The break in the electric circuit had not been closed by pressure on the trip wire.’
      • ‘A switch is a break in the circuit that stops the electrons from flowing.’
    6. 1.6Tennis The winning of a game against an opponent's serve.
      • ‘He is a model of calmness on court in the third set and secures the crucial break of serve in game seven’
      • ‘The final set was decided by a single break of serve in the ninth game, achieved with a spectacular running forehand down the line.’
      • ‘Both men refused to yield in a dead-level opening set completed without a single break of serve.’
      • ‘The 22-year-old crawled back to 3-4 with a service break in the seventh game.’
      • ‘She managed to pull off a decisive break of serve in the 11th game, and kept her nerves cool to get the job done in the next one.’
  • 2A pause in work or during an activity or event.

    ‘I need a break from mental activity’
    ‘those returning to work after a career break’
    ‘they take long coffee breaks’
    • ‘The students have been urged to take a break from revision.’
    • ‘Stressed-out homemakers can now take a break and leave the iron in the closet.’
    • ‘When I take a break from studying and go online, I'm still doing something stimulating.’
    • ‘Many parents worry that their kids won't return to their studies after taking a break from them.’
    • ‘This enables more efficient scheduling of breaks, meetings and training sessions, further optimizing agents' schedules.’
    • ‘Having set up the venue themselves, they left for a break but on their return found the hall locked again.’
    • ‘I needed a break from studying.’
    • ‘When you see a colleague struggling, walk him to the vending machine for a break.’
    • ‘The Maltese weather and lifestyle also call for afternoon breaks, when shop owners close and the island people rest.’
    • ‘Taking a break from signing autographs, he seemed pleased with the way things had gone.’
    • ‘Advise the patient to minimise time spent with flexed or extended wrists and to take frequent breaks.’
    • ‘Students come here to eat, drink and take a break from school work.’
    • ‘Doing the shopping could be as easy as picking up an order that you mailed ahead during a lunch break.’
    • ‘At the end of the day the High Court had to take into account the fact that teachers need a break too.’
    • ‘Usually I read the papers on line at lunch break, and read the print version in the pub after work.’
    • ‘And I really find that I put so much into it when I am painting that I have to take a break from it.’
    • ‘The clientele were predominantly student-types and twentysomethings, some working, others just taking a break.’
    • ‘On Saturday morning, a woman visits the family home for about four hours in order to give the parents a brief break.’
    • ‘Stopping staff having a quick surf on the Web will probably only result in more chatting around the company coffee machine or extended loo breaks.’
    • ‘We usually manage to get through another few cups as the day goes on, as a boost for flagging energy levels, perhaps, or an excuse to take a break from work.’
    rest, respite, interval, breathing space, lull, recess
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A short vacation.
      ‘the Christmas break’
      • ‘Then on Monday schools in the Paris region returned from their Easter break, and young students marched out of classes in their tens of thousands.’
      • ‘She said they feared Chinese students going home for the Easter break could become infected and pass on the virus when they returned to college.’
      • ‘People are taking shorter holidays so city breaks are more popular.’
      • ‘He is delighted to be back, but he did enjoy his break very much, and the weather suited him very well.’
      • ‘Cities Direct promises a uniquely different time with breaks to Belgium.’
      • ‘We look forward to organising similar activities during the summer break.’
      • ‘Will people want to honour her, as they did then, or will the extended bank holiday designated for this purpose simply pass off as a pleasant break?’
      • ‘They have put together three different kinds of good-value breaks.’
      • ‘Weekend breaks are available for about £160 for a double room for two nights.’
      • ‘He also stressed that the bad weather might afford people the opportunity to avail of cheap breaks within the region.’
      • ‘All I plan to do is enjoy my summer break and wait and see what happens.’
      • ‘Bryan, who is son of Michael and Carmel Reidy, went to New York in the early 1980s on a summer break from college.’
      • ‘I know that people travel from far and wide to enjoy short breaks and long holidays in our beautiful and historic city.’
      • ‘The couple went on a break to Paris in September 2002, but split up within a fortnight of their return, jurors heard.’
      • ‘So the summer break seemed an ideal opportunity to visit the outlaws, my partner's parents, and brush up on the German.’
      • ‘It's time to consider some time off and we're thinking about a short break to Germany.’
      • ‘With the recent weather conditions and the Christmas break they have had a well earned rest.’
      • ‘While the number of Irish holidaymakers enjoying short breaks or full-week stays in the region was up, there was a drop-off in visitors from abroad.’
      • ‘It was a relaxing break and well needed respite for both of us.’
      • ‘If you're planning a short weekend break to Amsterdam, there are a lot of places you shouldn't miss.’
      holiday, time off, period of leave
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 A short solo or instrumental passage in jazz or popular music.
      • ‘Also included is some of the music whose breaks and bridges formed the basis for this new music.’
      • ‘The song, with the addition of a long instrumental solo break, drove the lyrical quality of the song to the heart.’
      • ‘She is a fine pianist, straddling jazz, pop and classical styles, and the instrumental breaks on her debut album are solid.’
      • ‘Some of the songs are also too long and would benefit from shorter instrumental breaks.’
      • ‘Tracks on the album tend to feature brief lyric verses interspersed with longer instrumental breaks.’
  • 3A gap or opening.

    ‘he stopped to wait for a break in the traffic’
    ‘the spectacular vistas occasionally offered by a break in the rainforest’
    • ‘Towards the western end of the ramparts there is an obvious break where a path leads through rocky portals to gain a grassy bealach.’
    • ‘On the opposite shore, I could make out a small railway bridge through a break in the trees.’
    • ‘Eventually there came a break in the cloud below and I spotted a reservoir which I thought I recognized from a previous flight.’
    • ‘The saplings can survive for decades in the shade, waiting for a break in the canopy and a chance to join their relatives in the sunlight.’
    • ‘A break in the crowd gave me a full view of her as she stepped briskly down the steps, with her small square leather bag in her hand.’
    • ‘We are taught from a young age to look both ways and to wait for a break in the traffic before crossing a street.’
    gap, opening, space, hole, breach, chink, crack, fissure, cleft, rift, chasm
    View synonyms
  • 4An instance of breaking something, or the point where something is broken.

    ‘a break in the valve was being repaired’
    • ‘He knew that the pain in the shoulder and arm meant at least sprains, if not dislocations and breaks.’
    • ‘The City sent out a crew to repair the break, and a temporary patch was applied to the hole.’
    • ‘I could see Rachel had severe breaks to both her legs and my wife was lying motionless.’
    • ‘Over time, the area of detachment increases as more fluid passes through the retinal break.’
    • ‘He sustained a double break to his leg.’
    • ‘Thus, these pipes need frequent examination in case of sudden breaks.’
    • ‘The bird had a fractured leg where breaks commonly occur in leg trap injuries.’
    • ‘He is set to miss the rest of the season after sustaining a serious break to his right leg.’
    • ‘He suffered several breaks on both feet and legs, hips, pelvis and left arm.’
    • ‘In severe breaks, the broken bone may be poking through the skin.’
    • ‘For instance, if the break is clean and not frayed, he knows the frame has been knocked off the wall.’
    • ‘He thought he had only sprained an ankle but doctors at a local clinic took several x-rays and told him he had suffered a break.’
    • ‘She has been in intensive care at the hospital ever since, suffering horrendous breaks to her left leg, pelvis, ribs and shoulder.’
    • ‘Railroad officials plan to replace eight miles of track after test results Thursday showed internal cracks and breaks not apparent by visual inspection.’
    • ‘Use an electric shaver instead of a razor to prevent breaks or cuts in your skin.’
    • ‘Troops demonstrated their first aid skills, showing Prince Charles how they have been learning to cope with dislocations and breaks.’
    • ‘I was looking for breaks and bleeding, but there weren't any.’
    • ‘The seven breaks to his leg have been pinned and wired and his leg fitted is with a metal frame.’
    • ‘A bone break or crack occurs when a force deforms the bone beyond its normal elastic limit.’
    • ‘After a bone fracture, new bone cells fill the gap and repair the break.’
  • 5A rush or dash in a particular direction, especially by an attacking player or team.

    ‘he made a bounce pass for a basket on the break in the second quarter’
    • ‘Inside the first three minutes of the second half Arsenal had the lead from one of their fine breaks.’
    • ‘In the first half he made several breaks to launch English attacks.’
    • ‘He missed a simple looking penalty before making the break that put his team on the attack.’
    • ‘He finished off a fine break by Hodgson to score at the posts and Hodgson added the conversion.’
    • ‘They looked certain to score again when he made a swift break but the final pass went into touch.’
    • ‘A fine break by the full back saw him brought down illegally when a certain try for the visitors looked on.’
    • ‘By simply pushing the pace of the game, a faster team can create enough breaks to change the outcome of a game.’
    • ‘A single striker was aided by breaks from the wide players whenever they dared.’
    • ‘Although Newcastle dominated much of the action, early breaks by second row Chris Jones provided a hint of what might be to come later.’
    • ‘He made a fine break but fumbled the pass.’
    • ‘For the Cougar faithful he brought back memories of Martin Wood, a player capable of making vital breaks, drawing the defence and creating space for his team mates to exploit.’
    • ‘Jones converted, and then raced clear to the corner following a fine break by Judge.’
    • ‘They were already showing signs of taking control, with flowing passes and rapid breaks from midfield.’
    • ‘He made a break and passed the ball inside.’
    • ‘On eleven minutes, prop Alistair Livesey plunged over from a break by number eight Andy Monighan, converted by Jones.’
    • ‘The fly half made the break, but his pass was ruled forward.’
    • ‘The scrum-half made several telling breaks to earn the Man-of-the-Match award.’
    • ‘It would open up the ice for a big play, the long pass and a quick break.’
    • ‘He made a superb break only for the final pass to go astray.’
    • ‘They combined as early as the third minute, a break by the scrum half putting Dixon through a gap to score.’
    1. 5.1informal A breakout, especially from prison.
      • ‘One American soldier was injured in the attempted prison break.’
      • ‘Up to this point, two-thirds of the way in, the focus of the film was the actual prison break.’
      • ‘A dispatcher at the County Jail foiled an attempted break by as many as five men from the fourth-floor maximum security cell block.’
      • ‘He said it was possible that weapons used in the prison break could have been introduced to the property through the gaping fence.’
      • ‘When local residents expressed concern after the prison break, the company simply shrugged it off.’
    2. 5.2 A curve or drop in the path of a pitched baseball.
      • ‘LHP Mike Holtz has such a big break on his curve, even righthanders can have trouble with it.’
      • ‘He gets decent breaks on balls but has only an average arm.’
      • ‘Colclough gets good breaks on the ball and has good closing speed, something coach Bill Cowher likes.’
      • ‘The curve has a sharp, top-to-bottom break, and the changeup has come along nicely.’
  • 6informal An opportunity or chance, especially one leading to professional success.

    ‘he got his break as an entertainer on a TV music hall show’
    • ‘After attending workshops with the dancers for many months, he finally got his break.’
    • ‘There were stints as a trainee barman, as a telegram boy, and in a men's clothes shop before he got his break at 17.’
    • ‘The story that got me my break was published in an anthology by Vintage.’
    • ‘For a young person like Jane, getting a break - an opportunity to prove her talent - is a huge issue.’
    • ‘Those who pass out from her academy will be guaranteed an acting break.’
    • ‘It's an unconventional way of working which seems to have brought him plenty of acclaim at the same time as giving other artists their breaks.’
    • ‘The aspiring singer-dancer-actor got his break as a replacement in Hair.’
    • ‘He got his break in 1944 with When Strangers Marry, a film noir and eventually a cult classic.’
    • ‘He is a former policeman who got his first breaks in business through contracts with the police and military.’
    • ‘My break came in the late 1960s, when I was a senior project manager at JC Penney.’
    opportunity, stroke of luck, chance, opening, foot in the door
    View synonyms
  • 7Snooker Billiards
    A consecutive series of successful shots, scoring a specified number of points.

    ‘a break of 83 put him in front for the first time’
    • ‘After scoring a break of 118 in the opening frame yesterday, he lost the next on black.’
    • ‘The Scot said he was frustrated by his inconsistency despite a comprehensive win and two 130-plus breaks.’
    • ‘He managed to knock in two century breaks - and a 62 for good measure - and was still outscored by his opponent.’
    • ‘The world champion rattled in three century breaks to overcome the Welshman, including a 142 clearance in frame seven.’
    • ‘Equally, rather than widen pockets and make it easier for players to shoot consistently higher breaks, snooker's governing body have actually done the opposite.’
    1. 7.1 A player's turn to make the opening shot of a game or a rack.
      • ‘He tied the match anew at 7-7, but failed to pocket on his break in the 15th rack.’
      • ‘If you play it for a few hours, and if you develop some consistency in your break, your scores will improve greatly.’

Phrases

  • break the back of

    • 1Do the hardest part of (a task)

      ‘we've broken the back of the problem’
      • ‘They broke the back of the task by adding 81 runs in 16 overs for the first wicket.’
      • ‘They broke the back of their task with an opening stand of 111 in only 18 overs.’
      • ‘My belief would be that three or four weeks of intensive work would break the back of it and make sure that people started to think about things differently.’
      • ‘Mel is going to do lots of swimming and an hour's yoga every day, and I'm hoping to break the back of my music essay if the pool and the wine permit.’
      • ‘The grants from broke the back of the funding but raising the rest was still a real challenge.’
      1. 1.1Overwhelm or defeat.
        ‘I thought we really had broken the back of inflation’
        • ‘Several films gave the impression that the D-Day landings broke the back of the German army and it was all over after then, which was wrong, of course.’
        • ‘He was the man credited with breaking the back of atheistic communism throughout Europe.’
        • ‘This practice will eventually break the back of the middle class.’
        • ‘The wars over the Fair Housing Act were vicious and essentially broke the back of the civil rights consensus in the Democratic party.’
        • ‘But perhaps, given earlier exaggerated claims to break the back of illiteracy within five years, a more cautious approach may be advisable.’
        • ‘And soaring oil prices would be the final straw that broke the back of the economy.’
        • ‘If the Government truly is serious about breaking the back of organised crime in Bulgaria, several steps could be taken.’
        • ‘His historic march to the sea was the campaign that broke the back of the Confederacy.’
        • ‘The resistance to the war at home broke the back of the government.’
        • ‘Throwing money at the defense industry broke the back of the Soviet Union and ended the cold war.’
  • break even

    • Reach a point in a business venture when the profits are equal to the costs.

      ‘the firm will break even at the operating level this year’
      • ‘At the time, analysts said that the company needed to show that it was on the road to breaking even - not just that the management team was confident it would break even.’
      • ‘He said revenues from the deals meant the loss-making firm would not have to seek new funding before it breaks even next year.’
      • ‘The business was just about breaking even in January, with sales up 20 per cent on the previous year.’
      • ‘By eliminating the extras, we were able to trim our costs and start breaking even fairly quickly.’
      • ‘But in the most recent quarter it barely broke even, reporting operating profit of just $5 million on sales of $1.1 billion.’
      • ‘The scheme broke even in its first year and its turnover last year was over €3 million.’
      • ‘The business is barely breaking even, and it's going to take extensive promotion and careful management to improve its performance.’
      • ‘The company I work for has 5 divisions and two lose money, one breaks even and two carry the company.’
      • ‘Even in a growing economy, it takes five to seven years before a magazine breaks even or turns a profit.’
      • ‘This year the company produced 300 motorcycles and came close to breaking even.’
  • break in two

    • Break into two parts.

      ‘the slate fell from my hand and broke in two on the hard floor’
      • ‘A plane breaks in two in midair; multi-colored thread denotes an explosion.’
      • ‘He told her how his house had broken in two.’
      • ‘Last September it broke in two, draining a trapped freshwater lake into the Arctic Ocean.’
      • ‘The holds and engine room flooded, she was abandoned and later caught fire, at some stage breaking in two.’
      • ‘It will break in two at the perfect spot.’
      • ‘She felt her tears slide down her cheek, as she felt her heart break in two.’
      • ‘This can be done whether the ship is resting upside down, pitched at an angle or has broken in two.’
      • ‘Mr Patel struggled with the raider, Justin Conway, and the plastic gun broke in two.’
      • ‘Matt's heart had broken in two at that very moment.’
      • ‘The 484 ton Norwegian steamer Gier hit the reef in 1908, and broke in two.’
  • break a leg!

    • theatrical slang Good luck!

      • ‘‘Break a leg,’ he whispered in my ear before releasing me.’
      • ‘Break a leg, and I'll join you on stage when you give the cue.’
      • ‘‘Break a leg!’ I call after her.’
      • ‘Invariably, producers, managers, director and fellow cast members decide to pop their heads around dressing-room doors for a quick chat and a cheery ‘Break a leg, darling.’’
  • break of day

    • Dawn.

      • ‘On the open plains of Texas, I first learned the character of our country: sturdy and honest, and as hopeful as the break of day.’
      • ‘The woods are not welcoming at the break of day.’
      • ‘It would still be cold outside so early at the break of day so she could use all the clothes she had.’
      • ‘They walked onwards until the break of day.’
      • ‘They come at the break of day as the sun is rising.’
      • ‘Faint moonlight was streaming in from the broken windows, and from the weakness of the light outside, it was probably only a few hours before the break of day.’
      • ‘Ten minutes after break of day John will listen for the beat of wings and sure as light they will wheel in and come to rest to be fed, in the field across the road.’
      • ‘They undress and coat themselves in a glowing silver paint and dance until the break of day.’
      • ‘They walked the whole night long, and by break of day came once more to their father's house.’
      • ‘Every bone in my body was telling me to stay out of Lou's way if I ever wanted to see the break of day again.’
  • break (someone's) serve (or service)

    • Win a game in a tennis match against an opponent's service.

      • ‘He saved match point seven times, and also had eight chances to break the American 's serve.’
      • ‘She broke her serve the two following times to take the first set 6-1 in a rapid 24 minutes.’
      • ‘She had made what appeared to be a killer kick for home in the third set, breaking Williams 's serve and moving ahead 4-2.’
      • ‘I don't think he broke Dent 's serve the entire match.’
      • ‘I didn't have a proper warmup and she broke my serve right away,’ said the 17-year-old Russian, who won Sunday's Korea Open.’
      • ‘When the Italian broke his opponent's serve in the third set to lead 3-2 it seemed victory was within his grasp.’
      • ‘He's playing with so much power that I knew it would be tough to break his serve.’
      • ‘At 6-6, Agassi was a point away from breaking his opponent's serve.’
      • ‘The 26-year-old dominated most of the match, breaking the Italian 's serve three times in a 6-1 first set, and again in her opening service game in the second.’
      • ‘He breaks Scott 's serve for the first time with a sizzling forehand.’
  • break wind

    • Release gas from the anus.

      • ‘A slight, sickly child, he grew increasingly odd and eccentric, throwing tantrums, fussing about and repeatedly breaking wind.’
      • ‘A Swedish man has been awarded nearly £60,000 compensation after he was sacked for telling off a colleague for breaking wind.’
      • ‘What's the correct, polite thing to do when someone breaks wind in your presence?’
      • ‘On one occasion he broke wind at the venue then turned around to ask the audience, ‘Who did that?’’
      • ‘It is like being invited to someone's dinner party, insulting the chef, spitting on the floor, breaking wind loudly and then apologising.’
      • ‘Some scientists think cows breaking wind are more harmful than the greenhouse gases produced from our motor vehicles.’
      • ‘If you were in a room with me and Jake and one of us broke wind, would you know which one it was?’
      • ‘It's the first ever study to suggest fish communicate by breaking wind.’
      • ‘A vaccine that prevents sheep from breaking wind has been developed by Australian scientists in an attempt to reduce global warming.’
      • ‘The mother of a 13-year-old boy yesterday said he was suspended from school for two days simply because he broke wind in a classroom.’
  • give someone a break

    • 1informal usually in imperativeStop putting pressure on someone about something.

      • ‘In other words, they're saying: we do enough already - give us a break!’
      • ‘They wish you guys would give them a break and show them some respect.’
      • ‘Though there were actually a couple of slip-ups with the service, we'll give them a break.’
      • ‘Jess, give Amber a break, she's obviously upset.’
      • ‘The politicians need to pay attention to the people that are trying to make it and give them a break once in a while.’
      • ‘‘Please, I've only been a couple of minutes, it's Christmas, give us a break, please’.’
      • ‘It's time to give us a break, because people are fed up with all the inconvenience to pedestrians and drivers.’
      • ‘I have a lot of satisfied customers who have appreciated my efforts enough to use me again and again, so I respectfully suggest you give us a break.’
      • ‘You really mean this, but when you try to tell people, they tell you to give them a break.’
      • ‘So come on ref, give us a break and let us wear our mix-and-match football kit!’
      1. 1.1Used to express contemptuous disagreement or disbelief about what has been said.
        ‘He's seven times as quick and he's only 20 years old. Give me a break’
        • ‘The French-speaking population has increased over five times in size in the last 150 years. Is that a dying language? Give me a break!’
        • ‘Would anyone genuinely expect serious electoral matters to be raised at a works meeting!? Come on, give me a break.’
        • ‘‘Oh please, give me a break,’ I rolled my eyes jokingly.’
  • make a break for

    • Make a sudden dash in the direction of, especially in a bid to escape.

      ‘he made a break for the door’
      • ‘Tony took off for the hallway, tearing open the door and making a break for the elevator.’
      • ‘Eventually he made a break for the office through the kitchen door, only to be dragged out by his mate.’
      • ‘So, as she disappeared into the kitchen, I made a break for the door.’
      • ‘Quick, someone create a diversion so I can make a break for the toilet and scribble a note from my mum excusing me from class.’
      • ‘The driver then tried to make a break for it on foot, but was quickly apprehended by police who gave chase.’
      • ‘Ryan thought about making a break for it, but there was no way he'd escape before getting a bullet in the back.’
      • ‘Two members of the group have made a break for the border.’
      • ‘The orang-utan escaped by pulling a tile from the roof of the enclosure yesterday afternoon, then climbed through the hole to make a break for freedom.’
      • ‘By the midpoint of the film I was seriously considering making a break for the exit.’
      • ‘She then did rehab, stole a credit card and made a break for Hawaii.’
  • make a clean break

    • Remove oneself completely and finally from a situation or relationship.

      • ‘He decided that he needed a clean break and moved to a different town to start a new life.’
      • ‘I'd prefer to make a clean break and look elsewhere.’
      • ‘He said he had no interest in becoming a manager and appeared happy to make a clean break.’
      • ‘Of course, I'd like to retain some involvement in the business after I handed over, though perhaps there's an argument for making a clean break.’
      • ‘He was right to make a clean break with the past.’
      • ‘Unable to make a clean break, he dragged things out until 1999.’
      • ‘I do blame myself - I had made a clean break and got drawn into this situation again for no good reason.’
      • ‘They split up eight months ago over an old, and still unresolved, problem - Benjamin's refusal to make a clean break with Vanessa, a woman he no longer loves.’
      • ‘But councillors eventually voted to close both schools, saying it was better to make a clean break before establishing the primary school.’
      • ‘She said it was the right time to make a clean break and retire after the 1996 games.’
  • those are (or them's) the breaks

    • informal That is the way things turn out.

      • ‘He could have won it for us in the final minute, but hey, them's the breaks.’
      • ‘To tell the truth, I'm a little disappointed in this outcome but them's the breaks…’
      • ‘Well, hey, you made a choice and those were the results - them's the breaks.’
      • ‘Sometimes they won't talk to me; that's the breaks.’
      • ‘If you just say something like ‘oh, well, them's the breaks,’ it's a clear sign that you don't have the intense passion to be a ‘Top Model.’’
      • ‘He didn't get a fair shake, it's true, but them's the breaks.’
      • ‘It's sad that an otherwise solid and interesting game can border on unplayable due to terrible, absent level design, but them's the breaks.’
      • ‘Being an action picture, stereo would have been nice, but them's the breaks.’
      • ‘He appeared to be a mile offside, but them's the breaks.’
      • ‘I've really just given myself away to any of the fan community who may be reading this, but, well, them's the breaks!’

Phrasal Verbs

  • break away

    • 1(of a person) escape from someone's hold.

      • ‘I broke away from Tobias, moving to attack again.’
      • ‘She struggled and eventually broke away, and twirling out of his grasp, moved in the direction of her room, turning back to face him one final time.’
      • ‘He broke away abruptly and held her arms so she couldn't move away.’
      • ‘She was too stunned to move for a moment before she broke away from him.’
      • ‘‘Yeah, well, it's a day of love,’ I said wryly, breaking away from them and opening the nearest door to the courtyard.’
      • ‘He was trying to break away from the officer and get at the other man.’
      • ‘I broke away, eyes opening slowly to see what damage had truly been done.’
      • ‘The victim managed to break away from the assailants and ran off.’
      • ‘He broke away from Conor and raced into the bushes, fading into the shadows.’
      • ‘‘You need sleep,’ I said, breaking away from him and opening the door.’
      escape, get away, run away, make a break for it, make a run for it, run for it, make one's getaway, flee, make off
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Escape from the control of a person, group, or practice.
        ‘an attempt to break away from the elitism that has dominated the book trade’
        • ‘Leading ex-ministers began to contemplate breaking away from Labour to form a new party.’
        • ‘Girls had to break away from the bonds of home and family to be free to do what they wanted.’
        • ‘It provides knowledge, motivation and, most of all, an opportunity for poor people to break away from poverty.’
        • ‘She said the problem had its roots in teenagers, some of whom might have problems at home, trying to break away from parental control.’
        • ‘After the February Revolution the Church saw an opportunity to break away from state control without sacrificing the privileges which cooperation with the state had obtained.’
        • ‘These larger First Division clubs now want to break away to negotiate a separate TV deal.’
        • ‘And while alcohol remains the most damaging to society, there has been an increase in people using extreme drugs to break away from reality in new ways.’
        • ‘‘But I don't want to break away from the convention,’ says Ms. Nair.’
        • ‘A larger drug gang had drawn him into the trade and his client was threatened with violence if he attempted to break away.’
        • ‘Refusing to negotiate with the rebels who are fighting to break away from Russia, Putin has embarked on a ‘hear no evil, see no evil’ strategy.’
        leave, secede from, break with, split with, split off from, separate from, separate oneself from, detach oneself from, part company with, disaffiliate from, defect from, desert
        View synonyms
      2. 1.2(of a competitor in a race) move into the lead.
        • ‘There were several attempts to try and break away on the first climb of the day but they were all neutralized.’
        • ‘Riders have to pick their moments to break away from the pack - and their rivals must deduce when that will happen and react accordingly.’
        • ‘The men raced over a snowy 12k route and a group of 4 broke away early on and maintained their lead to the finish.’
        • ‘With eight kilometers left in the race seven women broke away from the main peloton.’
        • ‘France broke away to a slight early lead holding it through the first half of the race.’
        • ‘Piil was in a group of nine riders who broke away from the main pack just 16 km into the race.’
        • ‘However, at the start of the second lap five riders broke away stretching their lead to around 20 seconds.’
        • ‘But Australia and Germany broke away early on to move a lap ahead of the field.’
        • ‘But I was able to race well and make sure no-one broke away without me being there.’
        • ‘After the peloton came back together there were many fruitless attempts to break away and the peloton arrived in Barcelona compact.’
      3. 1.3(of a material or object) become detached from its base, typically through decay or under force.
        • ‘It is formed from snow falling in the interior of the Antarctic which compacts into ice. The ice sheet slowly moves towards the coast, eventually breaking away as icebergs which gradually melt into the sea.’
        • ‘Antarctica, which is about twice the size of Australia, was connected to New Zealand until 90 million years ago, when New Zealand broke away and moved to its current position.’
  • break down

    • 1(of a machine or motor vehicle) suddenly cease to function.

      ‘his van broke down’
      • ‘If your machine breaks down, this could prove costly.’
      • ‘That way, when the car breaks down, the washing machine floods the kitchen floor or the telly goes ping you don't need to make a drama out of a crisis.’
      • ‘No-one knows when the car will break down, the washing machine go into hyper-spin, or worse still, you lose your job, your child becomes sick or your partner leaves you.’
      • ‘If a particular washing machine broke down after seven months of normal use, it would seem probable that there was something wrong with it at the time of sale.’
      • ‘Who is responsible, for instance, when a machine breaks down?’
      • ‘If the machine breaks down, you could be left miles from help.’
      • ‘The washing machine broke down - again - over Christmas.’
      • ‘Leaving for class the next day, my car suddenly broke down.’
      • ‘Your new washing machine breaks down, and when you try to get someone to look at it, you're told you didn't fill in the guarantee form in time - even though you know you did.’
      • ‘Suddenly the bus breaks down in the middle of nowhere, which is officially the worst place to have a breakdown.’
      stop working, cease to function, cease to work, go wrong, seize up, give out, develop a fault
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a person) have the vehicle they are driving cease to function.
        ‘she broke down on the highway’
        • ‘However, the star of the show almost failed to make the battle after breaking down on the motorway.’
        • ‘Unlike the Paris to Dakar rally, where every car has a support vehicle, if we break down in the Sahara we'll be hitching our way out.’
        • ‘If you break down in the desert, stay with your vehicle and never try to do anything in the heat of the day.’
        • ‘If you do break down or have to abandon your vehicle, try to push it off the carriageway.’
      2. 1.2(of a relationship, agreement, or process) cease to continue; collapse.
        ‘pay negotiations with management broke down’
        • ‘Doctors have gone on strike after an agreement with management broke down.’
        • ‘The talks broke down on Friday without agreement.’
        • ‘After wage negotiations with hospital management broke down last week, the National Medical Workers Union last Thursday voted in favor of a strike.’
        • ‘But when their relationship broke down he moved back to his North East home and lost touch.’
        • ‘While a relationship is breaking down, people can be unspeakably cruel to each other.’
        • ‘Your marriage breaks down (or you suddenly get hitched) and your life changes completely…’
        • ‘Our relationship was breaking down, and I think she knew I was going to leave her.’
        • ‘Within weeks, however, the agreement began to break down and before long violence had reached an unparalleled intensity.’
        • ‘John is urging owners to pay more consideration to their animals' needs when their marriage or relationship breaks down.’
        • ‘Relations with his own father suddenly and unexpectedly broke down.’
        fail, collapse, come to nothing, founder, fall through, come to grief, be unsuccessful, not succeed, disintegrate
        View synonyms
      3. 1.3Lose control of one's emotions when in a state of distress.
        ‘the old woman broke down in tears’
        ‘if she had tried to utter a word, she would have broken down’
        • ‘Suddenly I found myself breaking down, my body heaving with sobs, and I felt Jordan's arms close around me and pull me close.’
        • ‘The witness broke down in tears during her testimony.’
        • ‘He tried to keep calm, not wanting to lose control and break down in front of the man who was challenging him.’
        • ‘When my co-worker got off the phone, she just broke down in tears.’
        • ‘Suddenly, she broke down into sobs, her hand leaving the knife handle and tears falling down her face like waterfalls.’
        • ‘She didn't seem to be the type to suddenly break down.’
        • ‘In December 1998 he broke down in tears after losing to a little - known rival from Hong Kong.’
        • ‘Emotion swept over her as she broke down in tears.’
        • ‘She was afraid she would lose herself and completely break down.’
        • ‘She wondered if his whereabouts for the past 24 hours had something to do with his mood and that's what caused him to break down so suddenly tonight.’
        burst into tears, dissolve into tears
        View synonyms
      4. 1.4(of a person's health or emotional control) fail or collapse.
        ‘his health broke down under the strain of overwork’
        • ‘His health, precarious since the war, broke down in 1921.’
        • ‘In the summer of 1927, the Indian prince's health broke down and he went to Switzerland to recuperate.’
        • ‘Golf was another pleasure until his health broke down.’
        • ‘In 1883 Archibald's health broke down and he travelled to London, hoping perhaps to make his fortune on Fleet Street.’
        • ‘For the next ten years, until his health broke down, he worked with great zeal to establish a public system of elementary education, supervised by a national body of inspectors.’
        • ‘He was appointed to this chair in 1883 but his health, which had always been poor, broke down completely in February 1886.’
        • ‘In the spring of 1901 his health broke down.’
        • ‘‘I'm scared of being old and dying without dignity and my body breaking down,’ he continues.’
        • ‘His health broke down in the Far East and he returned home to recuperate.’
        • ‘I nursed my wife for three-and-a-half years until my health broke down.’
    • 2Undergo chemical decomposition.

      ‘waste products that break down into low-level toxic materials’
      • ‘The use of aspartame is limited at high or prolonged temperatures because it breaks down and loses its sweetness.’
      • ‘Rather, large molecules tend to break down into smaller ones.’
      • ‘Ozone also tends to be unstable and break down into dioxygen and nascent oxygen and to react readily with other substances.’
      • ‘In other cases, a drug may break down into other, harmful substances.’
      • ‘Grass cuttings, if not mixed with other stuff, will break down into a layer of thick green sludge.’
      • ‘These plastics eventually break down into harmless products, but only after up to several hundred years.’
      • ‘In the chemical reaction, compounds break down to form various gases.’
      • ‘You can throw your cuttings as well as dried leaves in your compost bin, which will break down into a nutrient-rich compost for next season.’
      • ‘During digestion, carbohydrates break down into sugar and enter the bloodstream in the form of glucose, a simple sugar.’
      • ‘When you eat carbs, they break down into glucose, which is stored as glycogen in the muscles and liver.’
  • break something down

    • 1Demolish a door or other barrier.

      ‘they had to get the police to break the door down’
      figurative ‘geographic barriers can be broken down by the Internet’
      • ‘On other occasions thieves have rammed the doors with a vehicle to gain entry and tried to break down the back door with an axe.’
      • ‘Firemen then broke his door down and he was led to safety, the court was told.’
      • ‘No one was in the premises when police broke the door down, and detectives were today making further inquiries.’
      • ‘‘They had to break the door down to get her out,’ said Diana.’
      • ‘They have both agreed to come and tell their personal stories in the hope of breaking down some of the taboos that surround mental health.’
      • ‘One group of firefighters broke the inner door down and other firefighters were hoisted up to the balcony to fight the fire from two sides.’
      • ‘I don't remember much after that, they told me my dad broke the door down and then called an ambulance.’
      • ‘When two men inside refused to open the door, police broke it down.’
      • ‘Eventually the police managed to break the door down, carry her out and bring her here to spend the night.’
      • ‘The ‘see me’ campaign has been funded by the Scottish health department to break down negative attitudes towards mental health problems.’
      knock down, kick down, stave in, smash in, pull down, tear down, demolish, destroy
      View synonyms
    • 2Separate something into parts.

      ‘each tutorial is broken down into more manageable units’
      • ‘The 160 House members and 39 senators essentially break down into three groups.’
      • ‘They are made up of 6-10 units that break your job down into separate functions that reflect the different things you do in your job.’
      • ‘The scientific management method consisted of breaking down a business process into component activities.’
      • ‘He breaks down the recording process into the simplest of terms.’
      • ‘Fortunately, the report breaks the statistics down into highly specific segments which are informative and very useful.’
      • ‘I break the stroke down into its many components, train those components as separate entities, then put it back together to train for timing.’
      • ‘My nervousness is coming back, but the instructors break down the driving into fairly foolproof bites.’
      • ‘They broke it down into separate categories such as ‘moral authority’ and ‘crisis leadership.’’
      • ‘The human body is not a machine and its malfunctioning cannot be adequately analysed by breaking the system down into its component parts and considering each in isolation.’
      • ‘To do it, you have to break the whole operation down into separate, understandable, manageable components.’
      divide, separate
      View synonyms
      1. 2.1Analyze information.
        ‘bar graphs show how the information can be broken down’
        • ‘However, the figures are not broken down by race.’
        • ‘And one suspects that if the survey results were broken down by geographic region, it would be even less divisive in many red states.’
        • ‘It also sets out no guidelines on whether votes will be broken down by constituency or nation.’
        • ‘This year's national results were broken down by gender for the first time and showed that 54 per cent of entries were from women and 46 per cent from men.’
        • ‘It is one of the best in 20 years, and, if we analyse it and break it down, we will understand that better.’
        • ‘However, when the sample is broken down by age, there is a shift in the frequencies for bones from juvenile individuals.’
        • ‘It is a similar picture when the detailed results are broken down by political party.’
        • ‘But that changes when survey respondents are broken down by race.’
        • ‘Statistical groups are broken down by age, sex, race and geographic location.’
        • ‘Although this is proper, basic financial reports don't break the data down into information that will show you the true picture of your company or of a specific job.’
        analyse, categorize, classify, sort out, itemize, organize
        View synonyms
      2. 2.2Convert a substance into simpler compounds by chemical action.
        ‘almost every natural substance can be broken down by bacteria’
        • ‘Proteins are broken down into amino acids and fats are broken down into fatty acids.’
        • ‘The venom is broken down by heat.’
        • ‘A small amount of the sucrose is broken down into glucose.’
        • ‘These loosely bonded and larger molecules are broken down into smaller molecules.’
        • ‘Currently insulin cannot be taken in a pill because the hormone is broken down by powerful acids in the stomach.’
        • ‘In most instances, whey proteins can be broken down by heat.’
        • ‘Eventually, all organisms are broken down by bacteria into nutrients that return to the environment.’
        • ‘When starches and refined sugars are eaten together and undergo fermentation they are broken down into carbon dioxide, acetic acid, alcohol and water.’
        • ‘Complex chemical units are broken down into more simple substances.’
        • ‘When carbohydrates are digested, they are broken down into sugar molecules, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream, leading to an increase in blood-glucose levels.’
  • break forth

    • Burst out suddenly; emerge.

      • ‘Despite my effort, a sob broke forth from my lungs, and his eyes were suddenly upon me.’
      • ‘At last their feelings became too strong and broke forth in weeping and wailing, tears and groans, intermingled with shouts of glory and praise from some of the people of God.’
      • ‘The tropical breeze sways the palms just as the sun breaks forth to start another spectacular day in paradise.’
      • ‘Philip's smile broke forth again, pleased and relieved.’
      • ‘A hoarse yell broke forth from some of the celebrants, a sign that her words were taking effect.’
  • break free

    • 1Escape from imprisonment.

      ‘he broke free from house arrest’
      1. 1.1Escape from someone's hold.
        ‘she broke free of his grasp’
      2. 1.2Escape from the control of a person, group, or practice.
        ‘he wants to break free from his addiction’
  • break in

    • 1Force entry to a building.

      ‘it sounded like someone trying to break in’
      • ‘When no one answered, they broke in and searched the building, only to find a watchman sleeping at his post.’
      • ‘The thieves broke in through a rear window after scaling up a drain pipe to enter the first floor of the store, which covers 6,000 square feet.’
      • ‘The thieves broke in through the back door of the three-storey building.’
      • ‘Burglars first broke in Tuesday last week and took four projectors, each worth £1, 000, from a corridor.’
      • ‘They broke in by forcing a lock on a door and then made off in a stolen car.’
      • ‘Police believe the burglars broke in with the intention of stealing stock, but were probably scared off.’
      • ‘The thieves broke in by forcing a casement window in the dining room before ransacking the house.’
      • ‘The raid happened at 9.30 on Saturday night and police are not revealing how the robbers broke in.’
      • ‘A disabled woman has been forced out of her home after thugs broke in and smashed up the lounge.’
      • ‘The burglar, who broke in by a window at the house yesterday, left through the back door, taking a camcorder.’
      commit burglary, break and enter
      View synonyms
    • 2with direct speechInterject.

      ‘“I don't want to interfere,” Mrs. Hendry broke in’
      • ‘‘We know that,’ broke in Chris.’
      • ‘‘So where are we going to go now?’ she broke in.’
      • ‘The publicist, sitting between us in the back seat, broke in, ‘A friend of mine is the U. S. ambassador to France.’’
      interrupt, butt in, cut in, interject, interpose, intervene, chime in
      View synonyms
  • break someone in

    • 1Familiarize someone with a new job or situation.

      ‘there was no time to break in a new executive assistant’
      • ‘Initially, you are broken in gently, but too gently, for the first two campaigns are over before you have any real trouble.’
      • ‘He broke me in, literally taught me everything I know and everything I can do.’
      • ‘He will be broken in slowly, in a way different than the rest.’
      • ‘He doesn't like people, until his roommate breaks him in with typical Irish charm.’
      • ‘His supervisor was intent on breaking him in with verbal and physical abuse - or what he described as character building.’
      • ‘I figured they were breaking me in and not giving me a chance to think this would be an easy job.’
      • ‘‘Oh that's right,’ Morgan plays along, ‘we're breaking you in slowly, right?’’
      • ‘Is this another way of breaking us in gently, as per your previous observations?’
      train, prepare, prime, initiate, condition
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Accustom a horse to a saddle and bridle, and to being ridden.
        • ‘She broke them in and she rode them and that is how she got into the British team.’
        • ‘He next day, his son grappled with one of these wild horses and tried to break it in, and he got thrown and broke his leg.’
        • ‘Many of the horses had not been broken in and it was difficult to round them up.’
        • ‘In the coming months, foals would be broken in, stallions exercised to the limit and animals bought and sold.’
        • ‘Anne and Jimmy make a living by taking guests, breeding horses, breaking them in and selling them.’
  • break something in

    • Wear something, typically a pair of new shoes, until it becomes supple and comfortable.

      • ‘Never, never wear new shoes without breaking them in at least a week ahead of time.’
      • ‘To break your shoes in, wear them around your house for a few days.’
      • ‘Shoes can become more comfortable once you break them in, but if they're not comfortable to begin with when you're trying them on in the store, chances are they will never be.’
      • ‘Try on as many pairs as necessary to find a pair that's instantly comfortable; you should never have to break them in.’
      • ‘When you buy regular shoes, you just walk around everywhere in them to break them in.’
      • ‘To break them in, I decided to wear them under my jeans to the corner shop.’
      • ‘It turns out she's going to the company ball at the weekend, and she's bought new shoes for it and decided to wear them to work to break them in.’
      • ‘Next, carefully check that the boots were broken in evenly and have not been deformed due to a bad previous blade mounting or bad habits of the previous owner.’
      • ‘During today's fitting it finally felt as comfortable as I'd hoped - although I'll need to break it in and wear it for a while before I'll know for sure whether it's right.’
      • ‘He's wearing square-toed ski boots, breaking them in for Norway.’
  • break into

    • 1Enter or open (a place, vehicle, or container) forcibly, especially for the purposes of theft.

      ‘a friend of mine had his car broken into’
      ‘four men broke into the house’
      • ‘Detectives are appealing for information after burglars broke into a house and stole a safe containing items worth £10,000.’
      • ‘In a terrifying incident in 1988, armed raiders broke into her house and threatened her family at gunpoint.’
      • ‘Residents on a York housing estate woke up to a scene of destruction after thieves broke into a string of vehicles in a private car park.’
      • ‘Thieves broke into the house through the kitchen window and took a stereo and a tool box.’
      • ‘Last night while I was down here with you lot, a burglar broke into my house.’
      • ‘They broke into the vehicles by smashing the windows, causing more than £600 damage in total.’
      • ‘While he parked at the Trafford Centre to buy a birthday present, thieves broke into the vehicle to seize the laptop, discs and a camera.’
      • ‘But if we catch somebody red-handed snatching an old lady's bag, or breaking into a vehicle in the street, we've got every right to apprehend them.’
      • ‘Burglars broke into the house by forcing open a conservatory window and a door leading into the kitchen.’
      • ‘In Italy, four armed burglars broke into a man's house.’
      burgle, rob
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Succeed in winning a share of (a market or a position in a profession)
        ‘Japanese companies failed to break into the US personal-computer market’
        • ‘But there is a lot of competition in that area, it's difficult to break into a market when you only have a few customers.’
        • ‘It is hoped that information gained from the three-year project will be used by other farmers who want to break into the organic market.’
        • ‘Australian exporters keen on breaking into the Japanese market can still find plenty of opportunities.’
        • ‘I've been in the business for more than 10 years, but I am having a tough time breaking into an upper-management position.’
        • ‘Reports from the US say the company is setting aside $50 million to break into the Russian market this year.’
        • ‘She broke into a position normally held by retired military officers or well-connected businessmen.’
        • ‘They're breaking into new markets, launching new products, and starting to think about deals.’
        • ‘Chinese companies attempting to break into overseas markets are desperately trying to buy or build global brands.’
        • ‘They can offer advice, support and expertise to help companies break into overseas markets.’
        • ‘It also showed that Chinese companies are serious about breaking into the European market.’
      2. 1.2Interrupt (a conversation).
        • ‘Bert decided this would be a good time to break into the conversation, ‘How was your day?’’
        • ‘The young sheriff scratched his head and the well-dressed man broke into the conversation.’
        • ‘They were all trying to find a way to break into the conversation.’
        • ‘Kaitlin nodded, finally seeing a chance to break into the conversation.’
        • ‘Dr. Connelly cleared his throat, breaking into their conversation and making them looked up at him.’
        • ‘He had to break into the conversation to make a point.’
        • ‘She ignored his apprehension and broke into their conversation boldly.’
        • ‘She broke into the conversation with her usual want of tact.’
        • ‘He started to protest again when Harriman broke into the middle of the conversation.’
        • ‘He walked up and broke into the conversation to let me know that his name was Alex and I would have to leave the premises immediately.’
        interrupt, butt into, cut in on, intervene in
        View synonyms
    • 2(of a person) suddenly or unexpectedly burst forth into (laughter or song).

      • ‘At various points along the way, the group spontaneously broke into song.’
      • ‘Like any musical, it never seems strange when someone breaks into song, accompanied by an entire orchestra that nobody can actually see.’
      • ‘He interrupts conversations by breaking into song.’
      • ‘I just hoped she wouldn't suddenly break into song.’
      • ‘And as easily as speaking, she broke into a song that touched the hearts of all those present.’
      • ‘He was stunned at first, then broke into a fit of laughter.’
      • ‘She barely finished the sentence before breaking into another fit of laughter.’
      • ‘This appeared to be some sort of private joke because they all suddenly broke into laughter.’
      • ‘All three broke into laughing, but were interrupted by the doorbell ringing.’
      • ‘The two girls broke into sudden and unexpected laughter.’
      begin suddenly, burst into, launch into
      View synonyms
      1. 2.1(of a person's face or mouth) relax into (a smile).
        • ‘Her wizened face broke into a smile as she took in the sight of the three of them on her doorstep, ‘Visitors!’’
        • ‘He then breaks into a big smile, as if to reassure me he is only teasing.’
        • ‘Her face broke into an uneasy smile as she looked at him, standing tall at 6 feet, with a slim yet athletic build and a devilish glint in his eyes.’
        • ‘Her face brightened and her eyes lit up as her mouth broke into a smile.’
        • ‘‘You are lucky,’ the doctor said, breaking into a smile.’
        • ‘And he breaks into a smile for the first time today.’
        • ‘She pulled open the door and felt her mouth break into a rather large grin.’
        • ‘She is petite, blonde and quick to break into a sunny smile.’
        • ‘To my astonishment, his usual calm smile broke into a wide mischievous grin.’
        • ‘The kid broke into a sweet smile on hearing the joke, and with that the old man gave him a bear hug, covering his cheeks with kisses amid joyful tears.’
    • 3Change one's pace to (a faster one)

      ‘Greg broke into a sprint’
      • ‘Arin broke into a sprint, heading down the dark passage.’
      • ‘I broke into a sprint and ran the rest of the way home.’
      • ‘‘Let's go,’ said Leon as he broke into a sprint, followed closely by his father and brother.’
      • ‘He then broke into a sprint, knocking the remnants of the door completely off its hinges, and he sped down the staircase into the secret basement.’
      • ‘As soon as James was out of sight of the main room, he broke into a run, sprinting down the hall and throwing the door open.’
      • ‘I keep my pace quite fast without breaking into a jog, just to get my heart rate up.’
      • ‘A tear dropped, I started walking faster, and then faster until eventually I broke into a sprint and ran as fast as I could.’
      • ‘Ryan stormed down the street and Caleb stared after him in shock then he abruptly let go of Emma, broke into a run and sprinted after Ryan as if the devil was on his heels.’
      • ‘He breaks into a sprint and dashes across the finishing line.’
      • ‘She ducked down an alley, got out of sight of the main crowd, then broke into a sprint.’
  • break off

    • 1Become severed.

      ‘the fuselage had broken off just behind the pilot's seat’
      • ‘When pieces of the ice broke off, they pushed over the pieces next to them, like books falling on a shelf.’
      • ‘The rubber blade eventually broke off and we were stuck in the rain with only one good blade.’
      • ‘They suspect that part of the lava dome broke off, sending melted ice from a glacier onto hot rocks below.’
      • ‘They have been left out of pocket after a vital part broke off their electric fire.’
      • ‘Two of the chairs legs broke off in a loud snap from the force of the blow.’
      • ‘She reaches for a strand of hair and twists it tightly around her finger pulling so tight that I can see the tiny hairs snapping and breaking off.’
      • ‘Had to mow the law, though - usually a simple joy, but a pain since the lawn mower handle broke off.’
      • ‘Every time I grabbed anything on the side of the rock to try to stop my descent, it broke off and came with me.’
      • ‘He developed a massive blood clot that formed in his leg veins, broke off and travelled to his lungs.’
      • ‘It began life as a separate ice tongue roughly the size of Belgium before breaking off and floating into the Southern Ocean.’
      snap off, come off, become detached, become separated, become severed
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Abruptly stop talking.
        ‘she broke off, stifling a sob’
        • ‘Faith and Grace who had been telling him something, abruptly broke off, when Father got up and rushed over to me.’
        • ‘But he broke off when he remembered that he was talking to the enemy, not an ally.’
        • ‘As he was saying this, his son John appeared and he broke off.’
  • break something off

    • 1Remove something from a larger unit or whole.

      ‘Tucker broke off a piece of bread’
      • ‘Growing plants are influenced strongly by their environment - some leaves grow more strongly than others because of the light falling on them; some buds are chewed by herbivores, and whole branches are broken off.’
      • ‘Remove old flowers on the plants by carefully breaking them off.’
      • ‘Those collisions break pieces off of satellites and hence create new fragments that in turn can collide with still other satellites.’
      • ‘I broke a piece off of the pretzel and offered it to him in my palm, face up.’
      • ‘You will probably have noticed that when you take a branch from certain trees (some conifers for example), the branch looks like a miniature version of the tree, and when you break a piece off the branch, that looks like a tree too.’
      • ‘I break some small pieces off, and sprinkle them onto the surface of the water, and wait, tensed with excitement.’
      • ‘Jeremy broke a piece off for her and handed it to her very politely.’
      • ‘She broke another piece off and shoved it in her mouth.’
      • ‘You break pieces off, and one or two of the more co-operative chimps would come down.’
      • ‘When removing the pepper from the vine, cutting or breaking it off work equally as well.’
      snap off, pull off, sever, detach, separate
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Discontinue talks or relations.
        ‘the US threatened to break off diplomatic relations’
        • ‘Deciding that events had overtaken them they broke the meeting off.’
        • ‘Our relationship lasted for nearly a year before I broke it off.’
        • ‘The sale negotiations were broken off in August 2000 and the Bulgarian Government said the offered price was too low.’
        • ‘But, for unknown reasons, the affair was broken off soon after the interview.’
        • ‘Bryan and I have decided to completely break our relationship off for good.’
        • ‘The first attack took place after diplomatic relations had been broken off but before the formal declaration of war.’
        • ‘She temporarily broke the relationship off in the early stages, alarmed by the sudden intensity it had taken on.’
        • ‘I broke things off with him because, while he's nice to look at, I don't enjoy spending time with him.’
        • ‘He has been engaged twice but both women broke it off abruptly before the wedding.’
        • ‘Negotiations could be broken off at any stage if they failed to move in the right direction.’
        end, bring to an end, terminate, put an end to, call a halt to, stop, cease, finish, dissolve
        View synonyms
  • break out

    • 1(of war, fighting, or similarly undesirable things) start suddenly.

      ‘forest fires have broken out across Indonesia’
      • ‘A violent fight broke out between the two groups of residents, with the brawl lasting for an hour and a half.’
      • ‘When war broke out he willingly fought for Britain, and before being sent to France he adopted a British name so that he would not be shot as a traitor if captured.’
      • ‘Police were called after fighting broke out among a group of around 40 men.’
      • ‘A fire breaks out suddenly in the house of the Empress, due to negligence of one of her maids.’
      • ‘Many fights and minor scuffles broke out among the crowd and when officers tried to calm the situation the mob turned hostile.’
      • ‘I won't be at all surprised to find out that a fight broke out after I left.’
      • ‘Riot police moved in when fighting broke out between the two sets of supporters inside the stadium during the first half.’
      • ‘She was crossing the road when gunfire broke out suddenly as a car drove by.’
      • ‘The incident happened after a fight broke out between a group of up to six youngsters in the school's playground at about 8.45 am.’
      • ‘A fight broke out early on Saturday morning, in the car park of the club.’
      flare up, begin suddenly, start suddenly, erupt, burst out, blow up, set in
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a physical discomfort) suddenly manifest itself.
        ‘prickles of sweat had broken out along her backbone’
        • ‘You may suddenly break out into a sweat with cold, clammy skin.’
        • ‘A sudden chill went down his spine, and sweat broke out on his hands and face.’
        • ‘And why was a little touch of cold sweat breaking out across her palms all of a sudden… ‘Yes?’’
        • ‘A flush feeling came over my face as though I had suddenly broken out into a cold sweat.’
    • 1(of war, fighting, or similarly undesirable things) start suddenly.

      ‘forest fires have broken out across Indonesia’
      • ‘The incident happened after a fight broke out between a group of up to six youngsters in the school's playground at about 8.45 am.’
      • ‘A violent fight broke out between the two groups of residents, with the brawl lasting for an hour and a half.’
      • ‘She was crossing the road when gunfire broke out suddenly as a car drove by.’
      • ‘Riot police moved in when fighting broke out between the two sets of supporters inside the stadium during the first half.’
      • ‘Many fights and minor scuffles broke out among the crowd and when officers tried to calm the situation the mob turned hostile.’
      • ‘Police were called after fighting broke out among a group of around 40 men.’
      • ‘A fight broke out early on Saturday morning, in the car park of the club.’
      • ‘When war broke out he willingly fought for Britain, and before being sent to France he adopted a British name so that he would not be shot as a traitor if captured.’
      • ‘I won't be at all surprised to find out that a fight broke out after I left.’
      • ‘A fire breaks out suddenly in the house of the Empress, due to negligence of one of her maids.’
      flare up, begin suddenly, start suddenly, erupt, burst out, blow up, set in
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a physical discomfort) suddenly manifest itself.
        ‘prickles of sweat had broken out along her backbone’
        • ‘A sudden chill went down his spine, and sweat broke out on his hands and face.’
        • ‘A flush feeling came over my face as though I had suddenly broken out into a cold sweat.’
        • ‘You may suddenly break out into a sweat with cold, clammy skin.’
        • ‘And why was a little touch of cold sweat breaking out across her palms all of a sudden… ‘Yes?’’
    • 2Escape.

      ‘a prisoner broke out of his cell’
      • ‘The comedy begins with two friends attempting to break out of jail.’
      • ‘Eventually convicted, he broke out of jail and formed the Stander Gang, which sometimes robbed four banks a day.’
      • ‘He had served only 15 months of his sentence when he broke out of prison in 1965.’
      • ‘Yes, and once you're in the prison system it's very hard to break out of it.’
      • ‘It was too narrow, executives decided, and would do little to help the company break out of the event marketing niche.’
      • ‘He broke out of jail and has been following me for the past three years.’
      • ‘Should they manage to escape, they are to be pursued as dangerous fugitives and charged in the same way as convicts who break out of high security jails.’
      • ‘While on remand at Winchester Prison in January he had tried to break out of his cell.’
      • ‘He invites us to break out of the confinements of academic art and art history in order to open our eyes a little wider and take a glimpse at what is a far greater vision.’
      • ‘The man had been shot dead trying to break out of jail.’
      escape from, make one's escape from, break loose from, burst out of, abscond from, flee from
      View synonyms
  • break out

    • 1(of war, fighting, or similarly undesirable things) start suddenly.

      ‘forest fires have broken out across Indonesia’
      • ‘A violent fight broke out between the two groups of residents, with the brawl lasting for an hour and a half.’
      • ‘When war broke out he willingly fought for Britain, and before being sent to France he adopted a British name so that he would not be shot as a traitor if captured.’
      • ‘Police were called after fighting broke out among a group of around 40 men.’
      • ‘A fire breaks out suddenly in the house of the Empress, due to negligence of one of her maids.’
      • ‘Many fights and minor scuffles broke out among the crowd and when officers tried to calm the situation the mob turned hostile.’
      • ‘I won't be at all surprised to find out that a fight broke out after I left.’
      • ‘Riot police moved in when fighting broke out between the two sets of supporters inside the stadium during the first half.’
      • ‘She was crossing the road when gunfire broke out suddenly as a car drove by.’
      • ‘The incident happened after a fight broke out between a group of up to six youngsters in the school's playground at about 8.45 am.’
      • ‘A fight broke out early on Saturday morning, in the car park of the club.’
      flare up, begin suddenly, start suddenly, erupt, burst out, blow up, set in
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a physical discomfort) suddenly manifest itself.
        ‘prickles of sweat had broken out along her backbone’
        • ‘You may suddenly break out into a sweat with cold, clammy skin.’
        • ‘A sudden chill went down his spine, and sweat broke out on his hands and face.’
        • ‘And why was a little touch of cold sweat breaking out across her palms all of a sudden… ‘Yes?’’
        • ‘A flush feeling came over my face as though I had suddenly broken out into a cold sweat.’
    • 1(of war, fighting, or similarly undesirable things) start suddenly.

      ‘forest fires have broken out across Indonesia’
      • ‘The incident happened after a fight broke out between a group of up to six youngsters in the school's playground at about 8.45 am.’
      • ‘A violent fight broke out between the two groups of residents, with the brawl lasting for an hour and a half.’
      • ‘She was crossing the road when gunfire broke out suddenly as a car drove by.’
      • ‘Riot police moved in when fighting broke out between the two sets of supporters inside the stadium during the first half.’
      • ‘Many fights and minor scuffles broke out among the crowd and when officers tried to calm the situation the mob turned hostile.’
      • ‘Police were called after fighting broke out among a group of around 40 men.’
      • ‘A fight broke out early on Saturday morning, in the car park of the club.’
      • ‘When war broke out he willingly fought for Britain, and before being sent to France he adopted a British name so that he would not be shot as a traitor if captured.’
      • ‘I won't be at all surprised to find out that a fight broke out after I left.’
      • ‘A fire breaks out suddenly in the house of the Empress, due to negligence of one of her maids.’
      flare up, begin suddenly, start suddenly, erupt, burst out, blow up, set in
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a physical discomfort) suddenly manifest itself.
        ‘prickles of sweat had broken out along her backbone’
        • ‘A sudden chill went down his spine, and sweat broke out on his hands and face.’
        • ‘A flush feeling came over my face as though I had suddenly broken out into a cold sweat.’
        • ‘You may suddenly break out into a sweat with cold, clammy skin.’
        • ‘And why was a little touch of cold sweat breaking out across her palms all of a sudden… ‘Yes?’’
    • 2Escape.

      ‘a prisoner broke out of his cell’
      • ‘The comedy begins with two friends attempting to break out of jail.’
      • ‘Eventually convicted, he broke out of jail and formed the Stander Gang, which sometimes robbed four banks a day.’
      • ‘He had served only 15 months of his sentence when he broke out of prison in 1965.’
      • ‘Yes, and once you're in the prison system it's very hard to break out of it.’
      • ‘It was too narrow, executives decided, and would do little to help the company break out of the event marketing niche.’
      • ‘He broke out of jail and has been following me for the past three years.’
      • ‘Should they manage to escape, they are to be pursued as dangerous fugitives and charged in the same way as convicts who break out of high security jails.’
      • ‘While on remand at Winchester Prison in January he had tried to break out of his cell.’
      • ‘He invites us to break out of the confinements of academic art and art history in order to open our eyes a little wider and take a glimpse at what is a far greater vision.’
      • ‘The man had been shot dead trying to break out of jail.’
      escape from, make one's escape from, break loose from, burst out of, abscond from, flee from
      View synonyms
  • break out in

    • (of a person or a part of their body) be suddenly affected by an unpleasant sensation or condition.

      ‘something had caused him to break out in a rash’
      • ‘The youngster's condition first emerged when she broke out in a rash while gnawing on a rusk.’
      • ‘Brian noticed this, and broke out in a sudden blush of embarrassment.’
      • ‘He was stripped of his clothes and eyeglasses and held in conditions so appalling that to this day he breaks out in a cold sweat when he talks about it.’
      • ‘They worked me so hard I can't remember my 20s, apart from the fact I broke out in rashes.’
      • ‘Everyone I know has a new four wheel drive and suddenly the sight of my ageing Ford Focus makes me break out in a terrible rash.’
      • ‘Although it can kill if it enters the lungs, blister gas is used mainly to weaken infantry by making the skin break out in excruciatingly painful blisters.’
      • ‘Last night I scratched so much that I broke out in hives on my arms and drew blood on my legs.’
      • ‘Gasping, fighting for breath, she crouched on the cold floor, breaking out in sweat.’
  • break something out

    • Open and start using something.

      ‘it was time to break out the champagne’
      • ‘We won't be doing handstands in the streets or breaking the champagne out.’
      • ‘Have board games handy, and break them out when things are dull.’
      • ‘Hang on though, don't break the bunting out just yet.’
      • ‘Also, if you happen to have a private jet and an apartment in Paris, now's the time to break them out.’
  • break through

    • 1Make or force a way through (a barrier)

      ‘demonstrators attempted to break through the police lines’
      ‘the sun might break through in a few spots’
      • ‘However, around midday, the sun broke through and the visitors flooded in.’
      • ‘One man reported that the security forces broke through the gates of his house and took away his two adult sons.’
      • ‘The small spearhead would counterattack the eastern flank of the attacking force and try to break through their front lines.’
      • ‘Arnold became obsessed with breaking through the pain barrier.’
      • ‘Now and again the sun breaks through the clouds.’
      • ‘A personal trainer or coach can help you break through mental barriers and set higher goals.’
      • ‘They are both quiet until the plane is up in the air, breaking through the barrier of clouds.’
      • ‘Eight people were arrested during the demonstration after students broke through police lines.’
      • ‘Occasionally the sun broke through the clouds, but it never really warmed us.’
      • ‘Someone broke through the police cordon and kicked him with terrible force.’
      1. 1.1(of a person) achieve success in a particular area.
        ‘so many talented players are struggling to break through’
        • ‘It wants to use its success in Burnley as a launchpad to break through elsewhere.’
        • ‘It is probably her best album, certainly the one with which she broke through with critical acclaim and commercial success.’
        • ‘The party is trying to break through in these areas after the base it had in areas such as east London in the early 1990s collapsed.’
        • ‘The weary Englishmen, with six dropped catches during the innings, eventually broke through in the afternoon.’
        • ‘She is defending her seat against the advancing Conservatives, who broke through last year to take one of the ward's three seats.’
        • ‘We think Rick really broke through as somebody who's tough and able to deliver for New York.’
        • ‘They reckon that the Beatles really broke through in America after they appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show.’
        • ‘A Manchester United starlet, he broke through to the first team squad.’
        • ‘They've been up-and-down all season, finally breaking through with a ton of success lately.’
  • break up

    • 1Disintegrate or disperse.

      ‘the gray clouds had begun to break up’
      ‘the bones had broken up into minute fragments’
      • ‘So, as the ice begins to break up on the bay, the bears move closer and closer to the coastline, eating as many seals as they can to store up fat.’
      • ‘Pumps were put on the vessel to keep it afloat so that local boats could try and tow it from the rocks but it began to break up after an hour and a half.’
      • ‘The temperature rises to between - 20 and - 40 degrees Celsius, and the ice has not yet begun to break up.’
      • ‘The rain had stopped and the clouds had begun to break up by the time he woke.’
      • ‘Since then, for reasons that are uncertain, this landmass began to break up and the continents gradually moved into the positions they are in today.’
      • ‘Outside, the rain had stopped, and the clouds were beginning to break up, though inside the barn it remained gloomy.’
      • ‘One of the workers, Sandile Matshini, tells of his lucky escape when a container in which he was sleeping was pulled up a hill as the ship began breaking up.’
      • ‘They have identified 85 trouble spots where engineers fear trains could be derailed by tracks that have begun to break up.’
      • ‘The one mass of land began to break up, and the separating continents took with them living cargoes of animals.’
      • ‘Spring in Alaska is often referred to as ‘breakup’ because snow and ice on rivers and lakes begin to melt and break up.’
      1. 1.1(of a gathering) disband; end.
        • ‘The meeting broke up without reaching an agreement.’
        • ‘The meeting broke up without any firm decision being taken, as all members are now to be circulated to ascertain attitudes to the proposed £4,500 charge.’
        • ‘Police will also use a Dispersal Order to break up groups of youths loitering on the streets.’
        • ‘A police mission to break up unruly gangs is beginning to work.’
        • ‘Later he broke up the group and began an influential career as musician.’
        • ‘There will even be powers for the police to break up public meetings and gatherings without the need for specific permission from the Home Office or any government minister or department.’
        • ‘The police clearly have orders to break up even the smallest gathering despite the fact that freedom of expression and assembly are constitutionally guaranteed.’
        • ‘The police tried to break up any groups that gathered.’
        • ‘Last March, he and other officers broke up a gathering near the scene of the crash.’
        • ‘The crowd began to break up, flowing down the hall to their classes.’
        come to an end, end, finish, stop, terminate
        disperse, scatter, go in different directions, move in different directions, go separate ways, disband, separate, part company
        View synonyms
      2. 1.2British End the school term.
        ‘we broke up for the summer’
        • ‘The snow began, school broke up for the Christmas holidays, and she knew she would never be back again.’
        • ‘The weekend before school broke up, Emily threw a farewell party for Liz and Steven.’
        • ‘The Lowry should be in a class of its own when the schools break up for half term.’
        • ‘The school is expected to break up for the summer term today with many students sitting Leaving and Junior Cert exams next week.’
        • ‘Schools break up for their half term this Friday, October 22 and return on Tuesday, November 2.’
      3. 1.3(of a couple in a relationship) part company.
        • ‘I know that when a couple breaks up, they usually don't get back together again.’
        • ‘But our relationship soon fell apart and we broke up a couple weeks later.’
        • ‘I thought I would be going with my long term boyfriend, but we ended up breaking up after I bought the tickets.’
        • ‘What's the use of going through the elaborate preparations and wedding ceremony, when the couple is going to break up eventually?’
        • ‘The couple broke up and the stress of life as a single mother pushed her to the brink of a nervous breakdown.’
        • ‘‘I was thinking we should break up,’ he stopped and looked at me surprised.’
        • ‘You and Chris broke up once in high school, didn't you?’
        • ‘A story is told of a New York couple who break up, because the husband, Stanley, has informed his wife, Jessie, that for the last year he's been having an affair.’
        • ‘We broke up a couple of years back and don't talk any more.’
        • ‘We broke up a week before school ended, and haven't spoken since.’
        split up, separate, part, stop living together, part company, reach a parting of the ways, become estranged
        View synonyms
      4. 1.4North American Start laughing uncontrollably.
        ‘the whole cast broke up’
        • ‘Everybody broke up laughing, according to the police reports - except, of course, Julius.’
        • ‘There were a couple of times we'd break up laughing when I'd catch someone turning to look at me in a wide shot.’
        burst out laughing, start to laugh, roar with laughter, dissolve into laughter, shake with laughter, laugh uncontrollably, guffaw, be doubled up, split one's sides, hold one's sides
        View synonyms
      5. 1.5North American Become emotionally upset.
  • break someone up

    • Cause someone to become extremely upset.

      • ‘I cannot understand that, and it just breaks me up terribly.’
      • ‘Gordon had been crying for a week, but that song broke him up anew.’
      • ‘Obviously he was broken up over the loss of his livelihood, so why was this man laughing?’
      • ‘That income helped us make ends meet, but my little sister had to stop taking dance lessons, and she was broken up about it.’
      • ‘Like all satirists from Juvenal on he is broken up about the march of folly.’
  • break something up

    • 1Cause something to separate into pieces, parts, or sections.

      ‘break up the chocolate and place it in a bowl’
      ‘he intends to break the company up into strategic business units’
      • ‘He plays a shrewd businessman who buys struggling companies, then breaks them up and sells the pieces.’
      • ‘We broke it up into pieces and sold it.’
      • ‘A good idea would be to break it up into sections.’
      • ‘I broke it up into four sections.’
      • ‘Because the farms were broken up, individuals often found they were given an unproductive section, either with poor soil or without water or with poor access.’
      • ‘Originally this was one chapter but it got way too long so I'm going to have to break it up into two separate chapters.’
      • ‘When it's frozen, bash it gently to break it up into pieces - it should look rough - and put them into tall glasses or pudding bowls.’
      • ‘The supplements are broken up into five sections.’
      • ‘They are packed with detail but it doesn't seem overwhelming because the pages are broken up with masses of superb colour photographs, maps, street-by-street diagrams and drawings.’
      • ‘This will break the page up for the reader and they will be able to get the information they want simply by scanning your pages.’
      1. 1.1Disperse or put an end to a gathering.
        ‘police broke up a demonstration in the capital’
        • ‘He runs over to the dog fight to try and break it up.’
        • ‘‘They started to fight and I was trying to break them up and I never saw the knife,’ she said.’
        • ‘Four security guards entered the fight and broke it up.’
        • ‘Fortunately, there had been teachers to break the fight up before anyone had gotten seriously hurt.’
        • ‘The fight continued until three teachers came in and broke it up.’
        • ‘Meanwhile, a further protest against the summit was broken up by police.’
        • ‘The police were criticised for not breaking it up and dozens of complaints were made by residents whose sleep was shattered by the music from the rave.’
        • ‘The protests were broken up by police and militias.’
        • ‘‘I'll have to call the police to break it up,’ he answered gravely.’
        • ‘On the second day, the gathering was broken up by the police, but not before the charter was adopted as a guiding document.’
        disperse, scatter, disband, separate
        View synonyms
      2. 1.2Bring a social event or meeting to an end by being the first person to leave.
        ‘Richard was sorry to break up the party’
        • ‘Alright people, sorry to break it up but Kate has an important session to go through right now.’
        • ‘‘I hate to break this party up but Michelle has a class to get back to,’ he told them.’
        • ‘Sorry to break the party up but I need to steal your friend away.’
        put an end to, bring to an end, destroy, wreck, ruin
        View synonyms
  • break with

    • 1Quarrel or cease relations with (someone)

      ‘he had broken with his family long before’
      • ‘He openly broke with Lee when he defined China-Taiwan relations as ‘state-to-state’.’
      • ‘Centrism developed in the 1930s as a decisive obstacle preventing workers from breaking with reformism and Stalinism.’
      • ‘Long historical experience testifies to the need for a break with the Democrats.’
      • ‘The young actress breaks with her boyfriend after their relationship has become routine.’
      • ‘King Henry VIII was responsible for England's ultimate breaking with the catholic church due to his desire to divorce his current wife and marry another.’
      • ‘His opponents have warned they may break with the church over the decision.’
      • ‘When they decided this, I made my decision to make a break with the National Health Service.’
      • ‘For the most part this involved a decisive break with old Labour.’
      • ‘But he quit his official post and broke with the Nationalist party to run as an independent in Taiwan's first presidential poll in 1996.’
      • ‘The only way the couple can be together is by breaking with their families, blowing tradition out of the water and turning their backs on everything.’
      1. 1.1Act in a way that is not in accordance with (a custom or tradition).
        • ‘The musical broke with tradition: there was no chorus and precious little plot.’
        • ‘This year will break with tradition: my first Christmas away from my family.’
        • ‘These breaks with artistic tradition are appropriate for a man who broke with the most sacred traditions of his time.’
        • ‘He broke with tradition when his official portrait was done in photographic form rather than a painting.’
        • ‘He broke with tradition when he embarked on a theatrical career.’
        • ‘The bank is breaking with more than 150 years of history and moving its head office to London.’
        • ‘In ignoring international opinion and their own international obligations, they decisively broke with the past.’
        • ‘The Prime Minister is breaking with years of tradition by touring Britain without the Press.’
        • ‘In this election, he's breaking with tradition and voting for the left.’
        • ‘The Community Games broke with tradition in holding a cross country event where boys and girls competed in the same race.’
  • break in on

    • Interrupt.

      ‘the doctor's voice broke in on her thoughts’
      • ‘The seminar had barely begun when someone broke in on the meeting with the somber announcement: ‘A plane is down.’’
      • ‘‘Well, I hate to break in on your moment of bonding,’ said James, ‘but is that everything?’’
      • ‘Jerry's voice broke in on Vicki's thoughts.’
      • ‘Finally, he broke in on Adam's enthusiasm: ‘This is not the time to read,’ he said vehemently.’
      • ‘‘Sir,’ the Sensor Chief breaks in on the Captain's soliloquy, ‘We've identified the vessel from her markings.’’
      • ‘Perhaps it's just me, but reading even a year's worth of excerpts was dissatisfying; it felt like breaking in on Anne's story after it had started and leaving before the diary reached its tragic last pages.’
      • ‘Her voice broke in on the silence again.’
      • ‘I will break in on this exchange frequently to point out what has occurred, and to anticipate what the performer must do at that point.’
      • ‘Claire's delicate voice suddenly breaks in on my thoughts.’
      • ‘Ruthlessly she shoved aside the consoling voices that were trying to break in on her thoughts.’
  • break something open

    • Open something forcibly.

      • ‘He kicked again and this time the impact of his heavy boot broke the door open.’
      • ‘Police broke the gates open and ordered pupils back to class, but the pupils refused, and sang anti-police songs.’
      • ‘Instances of theft and robbery were reported where toolboxes were broken open, implements taken and others scattered around the adjacent bush.’
      • ‘An enslaved boatman spotted one particularly heavy trunk, broke it open, took some of its contents, and threw it into the James River.’
      • ‘It looks as if the hull was broken open for commercial salvage of the copper in the motors, and perhaps the torpedo tubes were salvaged from the bow at the same time.’
      • ‘When Mr Moore got there, he claims he found a desk drawer had been broken open and went to the police with a complaint of illegal entry and theft.’
      • ‘From the other side of the house came the sound of splintering wood as the door was broken open.’
      • ‘Inside the room, which was on the top floor of the eight-story apartment block, the officers found that a small safe had been broken open and emptied of its contents.’
      • ‘The door was broken open from the inside, not the outside.’
      • ‘The most common methods of theft, he said, involved thieves smashing windows, breaking locks open with a screwdriver or similar tool, or forcing metal doors open.’

Origin

Old English brecan (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch breken and German brechen, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin frangere ‘to break’.

Pronunciation

break

/brāk//breɪk/

Main definitions of break in US English:

: break1break2

break2

noun

Origin

Mid 19th century: perhaps from 16th-century brake ‘cage’, later ‘framework’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

break

/brāk//breɪk/