Main definitions of bravo in English

: bravo1bravo2

bravo1

exclamation

  • Used to express approval when a performer or other person has done something well.

    ‘people kept on clapping and shouting “bravo!”’
    brava
    • ‘Indeed, Digby, bravo on mastering the art of the paraphrase in mere weeks.’
    • ‘Put at its most basic, I admire women who are happy, and if that happiness comes from domesticity rather than promotion, well, bravo.’
    • ‘‘Political content is one thing, it's a genre, and when they are done well, bravo,’ he nods.’
    • ‘And I think, bravo to her to come to this gym at all.’
    • ‘My mother and sister and I watched my dad tell the press off that morning, and at the end of the speech my mother just stood up and said, bravo!’
    • ‘Because he was there and he'd come on the stage and say, ‘Oh, good morning…’ and the audience would go ‘Ahh bravo!’’
    • ‘Another unhappy aspect of applause - or shouts of bravo, brava, or bravi, not to mention those rock-concert-style whoops of pleased amazement - is the way in which it breaks into the mood of the dance.’
    • ‘‘That was wonderful, Andrews, bravo,’ she said nodding her head and clapping.’
    • ‘At the end people shouted bravo and clapped for several bows.’
    • ‘It's twenty-eight years too late, but bravo, James, for being relentlessly Spock-like!’
    • ‘I find myself so sympathetic to the arguments of this book, and particularly its central thesis, that I find it difficult to offer any critical comments other than: bravo!’
    • ‘I haven't had the guts to try that thing yet; bravo to you for doing so.’
    • ‘Her parents would clap and say bravo and her dad would look at her like someone who has the special insight to realize those moments were the best of his life.’
    • ‘A good writer, like a good painter or a good musician, can break all the rules he himself most lives by, and if it's done brilliantly, then bravo.’
    • ‘And if he wins out under those circumstances, bravo!’
    • ‘If readers at times have difficulty in making sense, so did I: if they can decipher certain allusions, bravo!’
    • ‘But there again, she went for a color and something different and bravo, why not?’
    • ‘The man behind me, who was also in the cheap seats, repeatedly shouted bravo.’
    • ‘When one shouted out her age as ‘eight’ in English, the woman applauded and congratulated her in English ‘Good girl, very good, bravo!’’
    • ‘A big thanks to our special guests, those who worked in the Erris lace schools during the 40's and 50's, who braved a cold and blustery night to be present, bravo!’
    well done, good for you, congratulations, take a bow, encore
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A cry of bravo.

    ‘bravos rang out’
    • ‘But the new restrictions - limiting Cuban Americans' trips to Havana and restricting the gifts and cash they can send to family members - didn't win the bravos the Administration had been banking on.’
    • ‘Cheers, bravos and applause rang out through the large concert hall, as the performers left the stage.’
    • ‘Werther's main aria, I think, was stellar and received lots of applause and bravos.’
    • ‘Finally, as she bowed alone in front of the curtain amidst the bravos and shouts, she mouthed the words, ‘Thank you.’’
    • ‘Upon the last notes' reverberations being lost in the Coolidge Auditorium, the crowd broke into enthusiastic applause and bravos such as I have not witnessed in Washington before.’
    • ‘Her every variation was accompanied by bravos.’
    • ‘Shafer was rightly showered with wild applause and bravos after Act I, to which she responded with faux-incredulous gestures of ‘Me?’’
    • ‘Feet stomping, bravos, and determined clapping made it clear that nobody was willing to go home, and brought the singer back on stage for his encore.’
    • ‘The audience thanked Lorin Maazel and the orchestra for that half with enthusiastic applause, standing ovations, and bravos.’
    • ‘Overall, the ballet offered a deft balance of theatricality and virtuosity, resulting in two very accessible productions that had the audience on their feet yelling bravos by night's end.’
    • ‘The theatre was full, and echoing to cheers, stamps and bravos.’
    • ‘In the meantime, the miraculous score is nobly treated by Levine and a superior cast of singers, and for that alone, the Met's efforts on behalf of Berlioz deserved all the opening-night bravos.’
    • ‘She gets an ovation, even before the first note, in the ritual that, like the hearty applause and worshipful bravos between each song, sets her in stone as the ‘grand lady of French song.’’
    • ‘Only when the singer looks up again into the audience, after endless seconds of being lost in a land of musical perfection, the applause and bravos break over the two men.’
  • 2A code word representing the letter B, used in radio communication.

    • ‘We were scheduled for post-maintenance functional check flight bravo and charlie profiles.’
    • ‘I immediately raised the flaps and began full braking, slowing enough to take an instinctive left turn off the runway onto taxiway bravo as the prop windmilled to a halt.’
    • ‘The first leg was uneventful until we approached point bravo and set up for a tactical ridge crossing.’
    • ‘Well, what they had was a series of camps: alpha, bravo, Charlie, et cetera.’
    • ‘Cancel matrix twelve, and change to bravo seven.’
    • ‘You'll have an extra soldier at your disposal that you can move between your alpha and bravo team.’
    • ‘This carries over to every level, right down to the new soldier who is now both a rifleman and squad designated marksman on alpha team, or a rifleman and Javelin gunner on bravo team.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from French, from Italian, literally bold (see brave).

Pronunciation:

bravo

/ˈbrävō/

Main definitions of bravo in English

: bravo1bravo2

bravo2

noun

  • A thug or hired assassin.

    • ‘Their quarters were wretched enough, but the bad side of Riverside was worse than most, and the tavern's location brought them face-to-face with half the city's would-be bravos with predictable results.’
    • ‘The second time, I read the part about the bravos.’
    • ‘Maybe the bravos in the night would stalk him to get a piece of that leather doublet and linen shirt for themselves…’
    • ‘Satisfied that no other bravos were abiding beyond it, he dragged the dead man by his sandaled feet into the room.’
    • ‘True, in the city nobody would think twice about Elanor, but Jinx knew that sooner or later some drunken bravo or arrogant mage would insult him, or he'd get mobbed by a pack of thieves, or ordered to leave by the city government.’
    • ‘Men have before hired bravos to transact their crimes, while their own person and reputation sat under shelter.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from Italian, from bravo bold (one) (see brave).

Pronunciation:

bravo

/ˈbrävō/