Definition of Brahman in English:

Brahman

(US Brahmin)

noun

  • 1A member of the highest Hindu caste, that of the priesthood.

    • ‘Caste was invented by the Hindu Brahmin or priestly group some 2,000 years ago.’
    • ‘During a recent visit, I found liberals and intellectuals, jet-setters and slum dwellers, men and women, Brahmins and untouchables expressing this Hindu pride.’
    • ‘The direct evidence is that these low caste and untouchables performed exactly the same ceremony, of dipping in the holy waters, as any Brahmin or Hindu sage.’
    • ‘In the Vedic Yoga system Brahmins used various breathing exercises, which are still in use today.’
    • ‘When a boy is born, a family Brahman (member of the highest social class) records details for the infant's horoscope.’
    • ‘In Hyderabad, the emperor in the name of purifying it and ridding it of infidel Hindu Brahmins condoned heinous activities.’
    • ‘People even of the very lowest caste may become wealthy; and a Brahmin priest in a little rural temple will almost certainly be very poor indeed.’
    • ‘I don't know whether Satish had read the Bhagavad Gita, but he was a Hindu, a high-born Brahmin at that.’
    • ‘The deification of the cow was undoubtedly linked with the rise of the priestly Brahmin caste in early Hinduism.’
    • ‘The applicant is a citizen of India and a high caste Hindu Brahmin.’
    • ‘This distinction mirrors the Hindu separation between the Brahman and those in lower castes.’
    • ‘The Islamic rulers discriminated between Brahmins and other castes in levying of taxes and this naturally led to disgruntlement.’
    • ‘This means nobody is a Brahmin or Kshatriya or Vysya or Sudra throughout his or her life.’
    • ‘Kshatriyas, the ruling class, and the priestly class of Brahmins began to exert pressure on the society and the caste system became more systematized.’
    • ‘The highest category of castes are those people called Brahmins in the Hindu system; they were traditionally priests and intellectuals.’
    • ‘At the top of this hierarchy were the first two estates or castes: the Brahmin priests and, as so clearly described by the Rig-Veda as the arms of society, the Ksatriya or warrior nobility.’
    • ‘In case your Hinduism is a little rusty, the Brahmans are the priest caste in traditional Hindu society.’
    • ‘Atharva Veda is also known as Brahma Veda, because it is still used as a manual by Hindu priests and Brahmins.’
    • ‘The food of the Brahmins is very light and vegetarian, and then there are the Hindus who are not Brahmins, who will eat non-veg.’
    • ‘It gives them an identity that neither Western Science nor Western thought has yet provided, because caste is not just a matter of being a Brahmin or a Harijan: it is also a kinship system.’
  • 2(in Hinduism) the ultimate reality underlying all phenomena.

    • ‘Each god is a manifestation of Brahman; in the ultimate world there are no differentiations of I and thou, subject and object.’
    • ‘It also represents to us the one life, what they call in Sanskrit Brahman which is that reality, that spiritual reality which pervades the whole universe, which is imminent in the whole universe, and not separate from it.’
    • ‘Understanding that the true Self within must identify with Brahman - the ultimate cosmic reality or essential basis of the Universe - the goal of the thinkers in the Upaniads is moka or release from the world of physical phenomena.’
    • ‘Mostly straightforwardly, the expression atman is Brahman unequivocally identifies essential self with cosmos, ultimately not two things but one.’
    • ‘Although seen to be present in all its material manifestations, Brahman is understood best as the knowing subject within us.’
    • ‘Finally he wrote his books on the subject of Atman and Brahman.’
    • ‘Atman or Brahman has been called eternal, all pervading.’
    • ‘The sense of presence, ecstasy and dread in the presence of a reality - called nirvana, the One, Brahman or God - seems to be a state of mind and a perception that is natural and endlessly sought by human beings.’
    • ‘This Reality as all pervading Consciousness is also called as Brahman, Atman, and even God.’
    • ‘In Vedic literature it is said that everything is Brahman and nothing else.’
    • ‘When the three letters are joined together to form the syllable Aum, that syllable should be used as the symbol of Brahman, or the Cosmic Reality.’
    • ‘Yoga means union with Supreme Reality or Brahman.’
    • ‘The diversity which we see and experience in terms of discrete entities has to be viewed against the total background of reality, Brahman.’
    • ‘Guided by a realized guru and avowed to the unreality of the world, the initiate meditates on himself as Brahman, Absolute Reality, to break through the illusion of maya.’
    • ‘Ultimate reality in Advaita Vedanta is Brahman.’
    • ‘He realizes that he was looking for something tangible and definite in his quest to find Atman and Brahman within himself and to understand the meaning of life.’
    • ‘It is very similar to what the Hindus call atman Brahman.’
    • ‘Truth is within us and the Atman and Brahman are one and the same, which can be discovered with introspection.’
    • ‘Very much like the Hindu concept of Brahman, Taoism conceives of the concept of Tao, which is the underlying metaphysics of all that is being and non-being.’
    • ‘It says Brahman is that ultimate ‘world’ which we gain access to by distilling the world down to its inmost content, or the furthest stop from where we get off by travelling backwards in time-space.’
  • 3An ox of a humped breed originally domesticated in India that is tolerant of heat and drought and is now kept widely in tropical and warm-temperate countries.

    Also called Brahma bull; zebu

Origin

From Sanskrit brāhmaṇa ( Brahman (sense 1)), brahman ( Brahman (sense 2)).

Pronunciation

Brahman

/ˈbrämən//ˈbrɑmən/