Main definitions of bowler in English

: bowler1bowler2

bowler1

noun

  • 1A player at tenpin bowling, lawn bowling, or skittles.

    • ‘Plus, league bowlers pattern their styles after their favorite player.’
    • ‘Some fans feel it is OK to heckle and tell pro bowlers what they should do on every roll.’
    • ‘On old wood lanes, bowlers would have to loft the ball farther out on the lane to get the ball to delay its hook and have enough hitting power.’
    • ‘More than 100 ten-pin bowlers from across the county were looking to strike gold when they came to Keighley.’
    • ‘Bowling shirts are more popular than ever, for bowlers and non-bowlers alike.’
    • ‘Put up enough money and top bowlers will bowl with a wooden bowling ball in a parking lot.’
    • ‘He's such an effective player that bowlers rarely manage to find an edge.’
    • ‘Most league bowlers will adjust to the lanes by moving their feet and keeping their target the same.’
    • ‘They were just recreational league bowlers, but I would go with them to their league.’
    • ‘She also helped recruit more good bowlers with whom she had bowled youth leagues.’
    • ‘However, many that are in bad condition pose difficult challenges, even for accomplished bowlers.’
    • ‘How many people can say they bowled with one of the greatest women bowlers ever - and won?’
    • ‘Graeme, a ten-pin bowler from Haworth, picked up the silver medal in his final event.’
    • ‘This pattern plays from outside, and the bowlers who do the best overall are the straight players.’
    • ‘Ajmal is an excellent player and an outstanding bowler.’
    • ‘He's in five bowling halls of fame as a bowler but is just as deserving as an instructor.’
    • ‘It replaces the baby powder bowlers once used for the same purposes.’
    • ‘The bowlers, camogie players and footballers are also in the middle of a busy season so there's plenty going on in the community at the moment.’
    • ‘Steven, of Shipley, who has learning difficulties, is a tenpin bowler.’
    • ‘Today, you see beginning bowlers showing up on league night with six or eight balls.’
  • 2Cricket
    A member of the fielding side who bowls or is bowling.

    • ‘What is good for cricket is that great bowlers should be allowed to bowl to great batsmen.’
    • ‘The bowlers and fielders were quick to remind the other batsmen of their incompetence to bat at this level.’
    • ‘There are laws which prevent batsmen and bowlers from leaving the field and returning to bat or bowl as they please.’
    • ‘He has the making of a perfect cricketer - solid batsman, outstanding fielder and a handy bowler.’
    • ‘‘All I could do was play in the streets with my mates,’ said the bowler, batsman and wicketkeeper.’
    • ‘White has already tried five bowlers, and his side seems set for a lot more legwork tomorrow.’
    • ‘Pollock added that he had no excuses for the loss, pointing out that it was extremely difficult to defend a total when the bowlers bowled both sides of the wicket.’
    • ‘He was an excellent fielder, particularly in the covers, and a decent bowler of leg breaks.’
    • ‘If a world-class bowler gets on a wicket that suits his kind of bowling he will get wickets.’
    • ‘On the other side of it, what if an illegal-action bowler bowls a batsman out consistently?’

Pronunciation:

bowler

/ˈbōlər/

Main definitions of bowler in English

: bowler1bowler2

bowler2

(also bowler hat)

noun

  • A man's hard felt hat with a round dome-shaped crown.

    • ‘His father worked in the shipping industry, and was unconventional enough to wear a beret to work instead of the statutory bowler hat.’
    • ‘In addition there was a fellow in a brown bowler hat, another in a shapeless cloth cap with a peak, and both added their encouragements, turning to Waistcoat in a laconic collusion.’
    • ‘A few hours later, a man cloaked in a dark brown trench coat and a brown bowler hat was brought to David's office.’
    • ‘On stage he would be dressed in evening wear, a bowler hat and a stainless steel waistcoat.’
    • ‘Is it at this cost that one acquires civilization and the happiness to own a bowler hat rather than a burnous?’
    • ‘After all, one did not often see a man with such a damaged face traveling in elegance: a new bowler hat and tweed suit.’
    • ‘His trademark bowler hat and striped waistcoat have been part of his image for most of his enduring career.’
    • ‘People used to call him the man with the bowler hat, at remembrance services.’
    • ‘Robust farmer-types streamed past the cameras throughout the ‘Province’ sporting the usual bowler hat, sash and swords.’
    • ‘However hard you try to change impressions the immediate image is of a pinstripe, a bowler hat and exclusivity.’
    • ‘For example, there is a bowler hat which is now as hard as stone.’
    • ‘It turns out that he's gone round the corner to a Victorian market, returning with a carrier bag containing a top hat, a bowler hat and a bright red feather boa.’
    • ‘Those who share my nostalgia for hats might be interested to know that it will be 150 years tomorrow since John Bowler invented the bowler hat.’
    • ‘Its subject is no more than an elderly man in a bowler hat turning round in the street as if to see what is following him.’
    • ‘Going to investigate, we're confronted with a man in a bowler hat and suit sitting at a keyboard looking rather like a waxwork.’
    • ‘He wore a bowler hat, white shirt, trousers and braces like the main character and would become aggressive and menacing when he played the film music.’
    • ‘Beyond a police car and a dark van, he stopped beside a man in a raincoat and a bowler hat.’
    • ‘I have just seen a chap dressed in a knee-length black overcoat and a black bowler hat, who was carrying a black briefcase, and a long black umbrella, as well as a copy of The Times.’
    • ‘The famous bowler hat and striped waistcoat are one of the jazz world's most famous trademarks.’
    • ‘Today, for a book signing for his autobiography, he is in fairly typical garb of blue suit with a red pinstripe, pink and blue striped tie, a black bowler hat and a silver topped cane.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: named after William Bowler, the English hatter who designed it in 1850.

Pronunciation:

bowler

/ˈbōlər/