Definition of bowl haircut in English:

bowl haircut


  • A haircut done by or as if by inverting a bowl on a person's head and cutting off the hair left exposed.

    • ‘He had a bowl haircut and wore a tribal tunic and what must have been fifteen pounds of fine white beads.’
    • ‘Bowl haircut or not, that little sweetie is adorable!’
    • ‘Never being a particularly innovative band pretty much guaranteed a weird, time-warp existence for the group, branded with bowl haircuts, leather jackets and denim jeans.’
    • ‘We decided that she wouldn't wear anything that would show up baby sick and that she has a pudding bowl haircut.’
    • ‘Once upon a time, there was a musical genre called ‘Indie’ which basically encapsulated all that involved jangly guitars, autonomy from major labels and… bowl haircuts.’
    • ‘We snip off her bangs right to the scalp, and then start snipping off her long hair right to the scalp, snipping her hair into a chili bowl haircut.’
    • ‘I mean, buying albums with transvestite cover imagery is one thing, but something with a photo of a pop-eyed teen with a pudding bowl haircut?’
    • ‘A young man who appeared to have been given an all-over body gloss with a spectacularly plastic-looking bowl haircut sidled up to my left and, with a sigh, began to urinate as well.’
    • ‘After three or four songs, it's Reece's turn to take to vocals and guitar whilst Keely parks his sweat soaked bowl haircut and flailing limbs behind the kit.’
    • ‘By the end of the film, not only has Willie gained in confidence, his very unattractive pudding bowl haircut has begun to grow out, too.’
    • ‘In fact Murdoch was 34 when they met, five-and-a-half years older than Bayley, and, while notoriously sexually alluring, hardly the obvious beauty that Winslet, despite the bowl haircut and misshapen skirts, still is.’
    • ‘I had my lavender cast on which was covered in drawings by Alex (he was quite the artist back then as well) and he still had the cute little bowl haircut that he cut off in the ninth grade and traded for something more masculine.’