Definition of bovine in English:

bovine

adjective

  • 1Relating to or affecting cattle.

    ‘bovine tuberculosis’
    ‘bovine tissue’
    • ‘The bovine luteal tissues were obtained from Heng-Chun Station, Taiwan Livestock Research Institute.’
    • ‘Some of these supplements, called glandulars, contain bovine brain, pituitary, pineal gland, and spinal cord, all organs where infectious prions may concentrate.’
    • ‘The pests were introduced to New Zealand in the 19th century and today spread bovine tuberculosis to livestock and wreak havoc on forests, competing with native birds for food.’
    • ‘One possible threat is bovine tuberculosis, a disease probably introduced to South Africa through domestic cattle brought in by European settlers at the end of the 18th century.’
    • ‘Commercial cloning of cattle has been available for about a year now, and that was within a couple of years of the first bovine clone being born.’
    • ‘It's a permanent soft-tissue filler that is composed of part bovine collagen and part polymer beads, which help stimulate the body to produce its own collagen.’
    • ‘Remember Dolly and all those other ovine and bovine clones?’
    • ‘Because of their bovine family ties, cattle and buffalo turn out to be vulnerable to many of the same pathogens, such as foot-and-mouth disease and bovine tuberculosis.’
    • ‘Some parts seem to be like bird or avian viruses, while other bits are similar to bovine or murine viruses.’
    • ‘Regular readers will know that we have been taking a close interest in homosexuality among farmyard animals - specifically ovine and bovine lesbianism.’
    • ‘Although generating swine clones appears to pose more technical difficulties than bovine clones, once piglets are born, they appear to be healthy.’
    • ‘Its forty-six helical-structured chromosomes are human, not bovine, avian, or reptilian.’
    • ‘Forensic tests showed that the blood was bovine or avian, and the ‘tumors’ were pig entrails or chicken livers.’
    • ‘The U.S. Department of Agriculture is actively considering a buyout of all 11 El Paso area dairy herds as well as a shutdown of the local dairy industry in response to chronic outbreaks of bovine tuberculosis in the region.’
    • ‘In the laboratory, ‘the nematodes can live in bovine manure for 4 to 6 weeks without hosts,’ says Taylor.’
    • ‘Remarkably, sperm mitochondria persist in mammalian interspecies crosses as demonstrated for murine and bovine hybrids.’
    • ‘As a result, those genetic segments record the genetic twists and turns of different cattle lineages and, in the language of DNA, serve as scribes of bovine history.’
    • ‘The bovine stomach bacteria add to a growing list of cheap, plentiful, and non-polluting substances that run devices known as microbial fuel cells (MFCs).’
    • ‘But he does serve up plenty of anecdotes about ranching life in the western United States, as well as welcome digressions on the economics of modern-day beef raising and the basics of bovine psychology.’
    • ‘Fewer and fewer cows are infected today, but now there is an outbreak of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, resulting from the consumption of beef products contaminated by infected bovine central nervous system tissue.’
    cow-like, cattle-like, calf-like, taurine
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    1. 1.1 (of a person) slow-moving and dull-witted.
      ‘amiable bovine faces’
      • ‘Anyway, today there was indeed one such person in the cafe, and the abrupt shift between bovine inaction and sudden stentorian animation was particularly marked.’
      • ‘She had always teased him, calling him reptilian, and he had shot back with varying degrees of irritation that at least he wasn't bovine.’
      • ‘Bosporus is named so because of the bovine woman.’
      • ‘In between, he kept saying something to the noble looking bovine companion, who was deeply involved with whatever she was munching, and couldn't care less what her master was trying to convey.’
      • ‘The bovine fellow hasn't overestimated, either.’
      • ‘In it I expose the almost bovine stupidity of a famous Leftist psychologist who tries to pin authoritarianism onto conservatives.’
      • ‘So, all in all, with my daily pill, I'm happy without being daft, content without being bovine.’
      • ‘Lemon is quite capable of irritating the most bovine of people or animals.’
      • ‘How sad, I'm writing about my stupid bovine great aunt.’
      • ‘The stock's up more than 100 per cent recently, though, thanks to some desperate financing, a helping hand from the yield gods and the boundless stupidity of the bovine retail herd.’
      • ‘That was Mrs Belmont, whose pretty, docile, and bovine daughter had been neglected since Katie's debut.’
      • ‘Together with her bovine friend Cassie, they intend to take the town for all its sweet creamy caramel candy goodness.’
      stupid, slow, dim-witted, dull-witted, ignorant, unintelligent, imperceptive, half-baked, vacuous, mindless, witless, obtuse, doltish, blockish, lumpish, wooden
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noun

  • An animal of the cattle group, which also includes buffaloes and bisons.

    • ‘Bangalore has so many of these wandering bovines.’
    • ‘The English hunter, meanwhile, was meant to follow not bovines but canines.’
    • ‘Players must build stables for the cows, send the bovines out to pasture and then bring them back in to milk them for much-needed resources.’
    • ‘Most numerous are ibex, of which there are twelve carvings, followed by horses, aurochs and other bovines, deer, and mammoths.’
    • ‘By 4.30 all the bails were moved, half to an easily accessible corner of the hay shed and the rest to middle of the cow shed where they'll be fenced off from the bovines.’
    • ‘Government authorities who have been blaming red-muzzled mice for the mutilations now must explain how the mice carried the bovines into the tank.’
    • ‘But cow's milk is certainly not toxin-free either; bovines commonly eat grass, hay, and grain sprayed with pesticides, for example.’
    • ‘Beyond the obvious nutritional superiority of milk over beer, mistreating dairy cows just doesn't make economic sense; bovines produce better quality and higher volumes of milk when coddled.’
    • ‘The last aurochs, the wild bovines from which domesticated cattle are descended, died in Poland in the seventeenth century, not long before the last dodos were killed on Mauritius.’
    • ‘And no, it isn't a show about bucolic bovines or pretty pigs.’
    • ‘The results of tests on this group of bovines shed greater light: within the animals' remains and around their carcasses, researchers discovered fecal matter from rodents and other animals.’
    • ‘There she learned to both respect and fear the power of beef, as marauding groups of bovines perpetrated numerous acts of violence in a gang war that lasted decades.’
    • ‘Scanning the kitchen as Ellen bustles about, I count six more cows: a blue and white ceramic dish on the table, a couple of refrigerator magnets, and a trio of colorful metal bovines frolicking across the wall.’
    • ‘Then there are the cows - eye-catching herds of multicoloured fibreglass bovines all over town.’
    • ‘Max will bring art from all of these projects to this year's show, along with the famous VW Bug painted in a wild spectrum of Max colors, as well as some beautiful bovines from Cow Parade New York 2000.’
    • ‘For the opera festival arts trail you will see six Cow Parade bovines graze the streets of Waterford.’
    • ‘We have started moving the cows into their positions at Sandton City and Nelson Mandela Square and the crowds can't help but stop and look at these beautiful bovines.’
    • ‘Entering the plateau of the great central region, one realises why Yaks, the famed hairy oxen-like bovines of the Himalayas, are some of the only animals who can exists on such scraggy vegetation.’
    • ‘These Chicago bovines followed similar Swiss cows, who grazed though Zurich in 1997.’
    • ‘We simply couldn't take our mind off the bovines.’
    cow, heifer, bull, bullock, calf, ox
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Origin

Early 19th century: from late Latin bovinus, from Latin bos, bov- ‘ox’.

Pronunciation