Main definitions of bound in English

: bound1bound2bound3bound4

bound1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Walk or run with leaping strides.

    ‘Louis came bounding down the stairs’
    ‘the dog bounded up to him’
    • ‘A pot of tea, thankfully, was on the kitchen table, and I slumped over to it eagerly, flopping down in my battered chair as Mom came bounding down the stairs, my three bags in hand.’
    • ‘We do not know who won the high jump or the triple jump except that a couple of Swedes have gone bounding down the track in delight.’
    • ‘Valentine sensed the relaxed atmosphere and bounded up to Aimée, jumping up on her.’
    • ‘A girl in a ruffled jean miniskirt with a colourfully striped v-neck, her light hoodie zip-up flying behind her, came bounding down the stairs.’
    • ‘She came bounding down the hallway from the kitchen shouting at him.’
    • ‘A small rabbit came bounding down the path at one point.’
    • ‘As I sat, Eleanor came bounding down the stairs.’
    • ‘Sally bounded up to him when he walked into the building alone the next morning.’
    • ‘Nick practically bounded ahead of me, the concept of pace eluding him.’
    • ‘As soon as we got back outside, she came bounding down the street, being pursued by another dog.’
    • ‘As she was climbing the stairs, Joel came bounding down, dressed in khaki pants and a blue button down shirt that practically made his eyes, which were the exact same color, pop out of his head.’
    • ‘I was still lying in bed, trying to force my eyes open, when he bounded up to me like a kid on his 12th birthday.’
    • ‘It was just as I was getting distracted by this odd train of thought that the door at the top of the staircase flew open and Rachel Marie began bounding down the stairs.’
    • ‘As I sloshed into the house, Bobby came bounding down the stairs.’
    • ‘Over the past five years, productivity has bounded ahead to an annual rate of almost three percent, after spending 20 years at an average of less than half that level.’
    • ‘‘Bye,’ he nearly whispered, before bounding down the hallway to meet up with the group of friends that had called for him.’
    • ‘As if on cue, Alisha came bounding down the stairs.’
    • ‘A moment later I was bounding down the stairs to tell my mom.’
    • ‘He bounded up to me and started to interrogate me as to whom I knew at the party and why I was here.’
    • ‘A young child out with her family was terrified by a couple of unruly dogs when they bounded up to her.’
    leap, jump, spring, bounce, hop, vault, hurdle
    skip, bob, dance, prance, romp, caper, cavort, sport, frisk, frolic, gambol, gallop, hurtle
    curvet, rollick, capriole
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of an object, typically a round one) rebound from a surface.
      ‘bullets bounded off the veranda’
      • ‘The sun bled stark white light over the court and it bounded off pasty nets that fluttered a little.’
      • ‘I didn't glance up from my plate until a roll bounded off the side of my head.’
      • ‘The ball bounded off the wall and Jeter went into second standing up.’
      • ‘Painter Henri Matisse had rooms overlooking the market, and you could see where he got his inspiration as the sunlight bounded off ochre walls in these tall, narrow streets.’

noun

  • A leaping movement upward.

    ‘I went up the steps in two effortless bounds’
    • ‘Since the winter break, however, he has come into the side, proving that his game has come on leaps and bounds, and in recent weeks the way he has been hogging the headlines has seemed nothing short of selfish.’
    • ‘Able to leap tall silos in a single bound, this animated environmental advocate uses her ground-scan radar vision to detect on-farm perils.’
    • ‘I hope that his mission will continue, and his death is seen as reason to work harder, to stand taller, to leap all these cultural obstacles with a single bound.’
    • ‘But only recently have videogames started making leaps and bounds towards a unified interactive product.’
    • ‘Water was run across, buildings were leapt in a single bound, swords made appropriately dramatic sounds as they were sliced through the air.’
    • ‘Now, they're called super shoplifters, and while they can't leap a building in a single bound, they probably could steal most of what was in it.’
    • ‘I think my sketchbook diary is leaps and bounds beyond any of my other work.’
    • ‘In a single bound, he leaped over a Texas blocker to force a game-sealing interception earlier this year.’
    • ‘These gents leap over buildings in a single bound, folks!’
    • ‘They leap by bounds, twirl their bodies this way and that, delighting in this opportunity to torment me!’
    • ‘Our tour has come on leaps and bounds in the past four or five years.’
    • ‘I work with him every week and he's come on leaps and bounds lately.’
    • ‘One way or another, it galloped in great leaps and bounds.’
    • ‘The tall building could be leapt in a single bound in lunar gravity.’
    • ‘It's taken considerable leaps and bounds since then.’
    • ‘His temperature leaps by bounds, his cheeks are flushed crimson, his pulse beats fast, and his eyes wear an altogether unearthly aspect.’
    • ‘He will come on leaps and bounds for today's run and has proved he is a leading contender.’
    • ‘With a bound, he leapt free of the car and nearly knocked the poor boy over.’
    • ‘Then science made some astonishing leaps and bounds, and it became possible to construct a theory of consciousness that involved nothing more complex than the physical brain.’
    • ‘While Mills has yet to prove that he can leap tall buildings in a single bound, there's no doubt that he is one of the most important and influential DJs in the history of the world.’
    leap, jump, spring, bounce, hop, vault, hurdle
    curvet, capriole
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 16th century (as a noun): from French bond (noun), bondir (verb) resound later rebound from late Latin bombitare, from Latin bombus humming.

Pronunciation:

bound

/bound/

Main definitions of bound in English

: bound1bound2bound3bound4

bound2

noun

  • 1A territorial limit; a boundary.

    ‘the ancient bounds of the forest’
    • ‘Built heritage experts concede that the most severely damaged buildings were not the most elegant, stylish or historic within the bounds of Edinburgh's World Heritage Site.’
    • ‘The bounds of the territorium, described topographically, match the present Llangors parish.’
    • ‘But there is ample evidence that they are erecting the bounds of their political playpen far beyond the confines of Westminster.’
    • ‘Curious as always, we walked beyond the bounds of the current development, into the rock of the desert.’
    • ‘He commands 45,000 police and civilians, and is responsible for a massive slice of territory stretching far beyond the bounds of what most people think of as London.’
    • ‘The chance to purchase a site of this critical mass and significance within the bounds of the National Park make it unprecedented in recent years.’
    • ‘And yet within the bounds of each paragraph, the writing is extremely cogent, even sometimes quite strictly disciplined’
    • ‘I do not need to take it any further than to merely say there is a broad power and it can operate beyond the bounds of the Territory.’
    • ‘Townspeople of all ages have taken part in the historic beating of the bounds tradition to observe the boundaries of Malmesbury.’
    • ‘Once within its bounds, I notice a winding single-story caretaker building to our immediate right.’
    • ‘We elves patrol throughout the Black Wood, and well into the bounds of the ancient elf kingdom, including the Marshes where you are from.’
    borders, boundaries, confines, limits, outer limits, extremities, margins, edges, fringes, marches
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A limitation or restriction on feeling or action.
      ‘it is not beyond the bounds of possibility that the issue could arise again’
      ‘enthusiasm to join the union knew no bounds’
      • ‘Even within these tolerant bounds, however, Nicolas Roeg was a limit tester.’
      • ‘Capable of great inspiration and idealism, they are often accused of lacking realism and being too trusting in the conviction that the power of belief, hope, or love can transcend all bounds and borders.’
      • ‘Mikala's clothing and personal belongings clattered to the floor, their owner's body no longer confined within the bounds of the materials and armor.’
      • ‘His ambition for approbation sets bounds and limits to his ambition, so to speak.’
      • ‘They are musicians for the 21st Century, where there are no borders and no bounds.’
      • ‘Therefore, the question of having a navy and of its parameters far transcends the bounds of military tasks alone for any state.’
      • ‘Such statements are entirely within the bounds of ‘tolerance’ and ‘civility,’ and they need no apology.’
      • ‘By contrast, hoarding of a non-monetary commodity is kept within bounds by declining marginal utility.’
      • ‘Confined within proper bounds, such measures need not pose a threat to civil liberties in general or to academic freedom in particular.’
      • ‘Questions linger about how the government will deal with contractors who may have exceeded their contractual authority - and the bounds of the law’
      • ‘And, of course, such systems have a way of refusing to be contained within bounds or borders.’
      • ‘His mother appeared to be extremely happy and her happiness seemed me to have no bounds.’
      • ‘It's fascinating to see how income tax law has been changed over the years in order to continue misleading people while staying technically within the bounds of the Constitution.’
      • ‘My lamb may not have been the most tender I've ever tasted, but it fell well within the bounds of acceptability, and the lentil sauce was a grainy delight, especially when combined with the dark, thick garlic jus.’
      • ‘Yet even the members of this excellent Cambridge team sometimes fail to confine themselves within the narrow bounds of testimony.’
      • ‘The Crown sets a finite limit and says that is the bounds within which it will negotiate, and if that is not accepted, then it will not be able to negotiate.’
      • ‘My only limits are the bounds of good taste, what I consider good taste.’
      • ‘If the precedent established at Nuremberg has any contemporary relevance, the entire strategy elaborated in this document proceeds outside the bounds of international law.’
      • ‘It's within bounds to distribute it by a hybrid, such as these passes - but the owners would be well-advised to pay attention to the social dynamics of hybrid systems.’
      • ‘But his views are neither racist nor extremist; they fall within the bounds of legitimate scholarly debate.’
    2. 1.2technical A limiting value.
      • ‘The fit results and the mechanical stability conditions allow us to determine bounds to the values of some elastic moduli.’
      • ‘Researchers can therefore use calibrated and uncalibrated models to provide upper and lower bounds to capture true values.’
      • ‘If the tiling problem for monotiles with finitely many vertices and edges is undecidable, then there is no finite upper bound on Heesch numbers.’
      • ‘Schofield and then McKelvey and Schofield obtained some bounds on k values.’
      • ‘This suggests that researchers can use calibrated and uncalibrated values as upper and lower bounds for true values.’
      • ‘The 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles of the resulting distributions served as the upper and lower bounds of the confidence limit.’
      • ‘The elementary method described in the present article can be refined to yield a quantitative upper bound.’
      • ‘The program gives the lower and upper bounds on the confidence interval as well as the length of the interval, obtained by subtracting the lower from the upper bound.’
      • ‘Weinstein's method was developed to give accurate bounds for eigenvalues of plates and membranes.’
      • ‘He gave bounds for the least quadratic residues modulo a prime, and for the least primitive root for a prime.’
      • ‘However, the fact that they can prove bounds for their alternate algorithms suggests that maybe this is a line of attack to take when analyzing Lloyd's method.’
      • ‘Using the entropy framework, a prior, or expected value, and upper and lower bounds are needed for each estimated coefficient and error term.’
      • ‘Instead, therefore, one tries to find upper and lower bounds.’
      • ‘What is known is that all techniques used so far to prove lower bounds on computational models reside in a specific low fragment of Peano arithmetic.’
      • ‘Instead, simulations are employed to test how different upper bounds limit the rate of false inclusions across a range of reasonable conditions.’
      • ‘Also, our upper bounds may be too high, but how will we ever prove it?’
      • ‘Ninety-five percent confidence bounds were calculated using the standard normal distribution.’
      • ‘Clearly, as we have already seen, the key size provides an upper bound of an algorithm's cryptographic strength.’
      • ‘Thus the energy barriers estimated this way are lower bounds for the true barriers.’
      • ‘For example, the usual definition of least upper bound is impredicative, since it characterizes a number in terms of a collection of upper bounds, and the defined number is a member of that collection.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Form the boundary of; enclose.

    ‘the ground was bounded by a main road on one side and a meadow on the other’
    • ‘The site is bounded by natural limestone walls.’
    • ‘The outer hair cell has a liquid core bounded by a composite wall.’
    • ‘On the bit of garden outworks bounded by the wall is a little group of rowans and lilac, and beneath them grow more daffodils, which we have never noticed particularly.’
    • ‘The immediate grounds of the house are bounded by a wall and a gate, and then the ‘wilderness,’ a wooded and wilder area.’
    • ‘The little area now covered by the shed was once a favorite play spot bounded by the hedge and pecan tree on the north, the rock wall on the east, and the alley on the south.’
    • ‘Oval in plan, the enclosure is bounded by a single stone wall 2.7 m. thick.’
    • ‘He was told that the City Council had just received approval from the Health Service Executive to move back the wall bounding the hospital and that work would be done in April.’
    • ‘After a short rest I turned off down Smithyard Lane - a dirt road, single track, running between open fields and bounded by high hedges.’
    • ‘The site is bounded by fencing, hedges and trees, and fences divide most of the plots.’
    • ‘The next image zooms in on the area bounded by the gray circle.’
    • ‘The long back garden is bounded by walls, mature trees and hedging.’
    • ‘It is 120 feet long and 45 feet wide, is enclosed by cut stone granite walls and bounded by mature trees.’
    • ‘When the game starts, your selected object is presented in the center of a spherical space bounded by fractal walls.’
    • ‘Old City, bounded by stone walls which once formed part of a fortress, is divided into four quarters.’
    • ‘He may be telling an unfortunate tale, but one still infused with the vitality of childhood, even bounded by the walls of a tiny flat.’
    • ‘The drive is steep, and narrow, and bounded by high stone walls.’
    • ‘Mosses, ferns and green and white lichens sprawled all over the wet rock wall that bounded the inner curve of the levada.’
    • ‘Outside, the front lawn is bounded by walls and contains a selection of plants and shrubs as well as a cobblelock driveway providing parking for two cars.’
    • ‘After laying and during the washing, we had problems getting rid of the water (all but one side of the house is bounded by walls).’
    • ‘The east-facing back garden of number 26 is bounded by granite walls and laid in lawn with flower borders.’
    enclose, surround, encircle, circle, ring, circumscribe, border
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Place within certain limits; restrict.
      ‘freedom of action is bounded by law’
      • ‘All these people are bound within an institutional culture of hate and degradation.’
      • ‘Parents tell us what to do and how to act, then teachers and of course we all live in a world bounded by rules and regulations enforced by the law or religion and morality.’
      • ‘The limits of your imagination are bounded only by your budgets, so think creative.’
      • ‘Passion and compassion are, thankfully, not bounded by the cumbersome fences of nationalism.’
      • ‘Your reputation, however that may be defined, is clearly not bounded by these shores.’
      • ‘It's easy to see that the way you define or bound a problem points you strongly in the direction of one - or another - strategic choice.’
      • ‘Isn't it bad enough that everyday existence is bounded by laws and conventions, without art feeling that it has to follow suit?’
      • ‘And what forms that apparatus takes are bounded only by our imagination and the laws of physics.’
      • ‘Both parties are bound by mutual confidentiality restrictions, and I really can't comment.’
      • ‘Symphonic music was, and still is, bounded only by the limits of the imagination.’
      • ‘The relevant function here was to perform those legal obligations which bound the Council to comply with the laws so far as nuisance and potentially negligence were concerned.’
      • ‘Secondary categories are not strictly bounded, and their limits are constantly redefined through practice.’
      • ‘This could be a pointer to many new writers who are bound by geographical limits.’
      • ‘In terms of the product continuum, they have enabled users to personalise their trainers, creating designs and patterns within a tightly bounded shoe design.’
      • ‘All behavior would therefore be caused and bounded by the laws relating to chemistry and physics.’
      • ‘The Act can be seen as a good start, but with the restrictions bounded upon it the government have been criticised for ‘not doing better’.’
      • ‘The only legitimate and productive political action must be bounded by the limits of the status quo and the Democrats who protect it.’
      • ‘The body is a part of the physical world, and diseases are bounded disorders that must be treated within this realm.’
      • ‘Freedom in this context is bounded entirely by reference to the law.’
      • ‘It is bounded exclusively by our belief and the limits we place on ourselves.’

Phrases

  • in bounds

    • (in sports) inside the regular playing area.

      • ‘Why shouldn't replay help decide whether he didn't land in bounds because of the tackle or because of his own momentum?’
      • ‘If he makes a mistake in the previous game, such as running a route short of its proper depth or not getting both feet in bounds, he'll be cognizant of it during practice the following week.’
      • ‘The official on the field ruled the catch good, but TV replays showed Johnson's elbow landed out of bounds before his second foot came down in bounds.’
      • ‘The passer immediately steps in bounds, preferably on the block.’
      • ‘Replays showed Johnson landed two feet in bounds.’
      • ‘This way, when I pass the ball in bounds, the defense has to find their man and react to the situation.’
      • ‘As long as any portion of the ball is in bounds, you can play this shot.’
      • ‘When someone has to throw the ball in bounds, they only have 5 seconds to do so, or the other team gets the ball.’
      • ‘Proehl leaped, caught it, and kept both feet in bounds.’
      • ‘You throw the ball in bounds safely, and your player hugs the basketball and awaits the foul.’
  • out of bounds

    • 1(in sports) outside the regular playing area.

      ‘he hit his third shot out of bounds at the 17th’
      • ‘He fields the kick and instantly stumbles out of bounds.’
      • ‘Trying for more yardage after a reception instead of calling a timeout or going out of bounds, he ran out the dock, costing his team an attempt at a game-winning field goal.’
      • ‘Once a basket is scored, the ball passes to the opposition who start play out of bounds at the end of the court and pass it in-bounds.’
      • ‘I see a kid get the ball out of bounds, come down the court going between his legs and behind his back repeatedly without reason.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, her shot hit the goal post and bounced out of bounds.’
      • ‘Blocked shots almost always go out of bounds or result in a foul.’
      • ‘Instead, the former quarterback sprinted all the way back across the field and out of bounds right at the first-down marker.’
      • ‘Kicks and punts angled to the comers invariably seem to go out of bounds, which costs the team in field position.’
      • ‘She then appeared to lose a step, dropping four straight games during a stretch when she double-faulted three times and saw her long ground strokes carry out of bounds on the clay court.’
      • ‘He blocked a shot out of bounds and lobbied for possession.’
      1. 1.1(of a place) outside the limits of where one is permitted to be.
        ‘his kitchen was out of bounds to me at mealtimes’
        • ‘This not only provides a circular reservoir walk but also allows access to views of the water from areas that were previously out of bounds to the public.’
        • ‘Large areas of the countryside were out of bounds to both city and rural dwellers today as Government officials tried to halt the spread of foot-and-mouth disease.’
        • ‘None of them could watch anything because the day room was put out of bounds to them.’
        • ‘The main car park at the 900-acre Bishop Wood, near Selby, is now out of bounds to motorists.’
        • ‘The Bellary Road, which has been earmarked for the parking of VIP vehicles, has become a restricted area, out of bounds to other commuters.’
        • ‘It was feared that up to 80 square miles of the park would have to be put out of bounds to climbers and walkers following the recent dry weather and the danger of two fires that raged last week.’
        • ‘He invited me into the section out of bounds to the public.’
        • ‘A quarter of the playground is still out of bounds to children until resurfacing work, at an estimated cost of £1, 000, is carried out.’
        • ‘All of these, he says, are part of the ‘common wealth’ that needs to be protected from being sold off and becoming out of bounds to those who won't pay the entrance fee.’
        • ‘As a result of suspected malicious damage to the water fountain at Riverside Park the fountain is out of bounds to all comers to the park.’
        off limits, restricted, reserved, closed off
        forbidden, banned, proscribed, vetoed, interdicted, ruled out, not allowed, not permitted, illegal, illicit, unlawful, impermissible, not acceptable, taboo
        verboten
        no go
        non licet
        View synonyms
      2. 1.2Beyond what is acceptable.
        ‘Paul felt that this conversation was getting out of bounds’
        • ‘There's something fantastically liberating in the licence she gives you to laugh at subjects usually out of bounds.’
        • ‘And I bet you'll see tonight members of the audience ask questions that, you know, just four or eight years ago would have frankly seemed a little out of bounds.’
        • ‘I am more comfortable about talking about what I think is definitely out of bounds than in coming up with a theory that would provide answers to all or maybe even most legal questions.’
        • ‘I don't think it's out of bounds to say that that last comment that she made that was very controversial.’
        • ‘Another possibility is that the rhetoric reframes the debate entirely, making it impossible to mount a defense of an issue without seeming to be out of bounds.’
        • ‘I didn't like it, but it wasn't completely out of bounds.’
        • ‘For him, all personal experience is grist to the writer's mill; nothing is taboo or out of bounds.’
        • ‘Do you consider anything out of bounds anymore?’
        • ‘But I think this clearly qualifies as way, way out of bounds.’
        • ‘For the busy lady this posed something of a nightmare as sandwiches were forbidden and a nice plate of pasta with sauce was out of bounds.’

Origin

Middle English (in the senses landmark and borderland): from Old French bodne, from medieval Latin bodina, earlier butina, of unknown ultimate origin.

Pronunciation:

bound

/bound/

Main definitions of bound in English

: bound1bound2bound3bound4

bound3

adjective

  • 1Heading toward somewhere.

    ‘trains bound for Chicago’
    [in combination] ‘the three moon-bound astronauts’
    • ‘He shouted at a handful of passengers, who boarded another bus bound for the same destination, and forced them to alight, leaving all their belongings in the bus.’
    • ‘Two experienced Spaniards, inseparable partners, were bound for Ancohuma.’
    • ‘Much to my delight, the traffic was heading in the other direction and I had the northern bound freeway to myself.’
    • ‘Although the initial stay was only six months, after returning to France it wasn't long before they were bound for Bulgaria once again.’
    • ‘On December 3, he checked out again and jumped on a plane bound for Hawaii.’
    • ‘The container was loaded onto a ship at Zeebrugge bound for Ireland and police believe that is the most likely place for them to have stowed away.’
    • ‘So he fled that very night, running many miles away from his master, and jumped onto a ship bound for Britain.’
    • ‘Servants bound for less desirable colonial destinations also received shorter terms.’
    • ‘We in the hardboat were bound for Mumbles Pier, the others for more distant destinations.’
    • ‘Suitcases, once bound for holidays abroad in Mexico and the USA, were left strewn across all four lanes of the carriageway.’
    • ‘Two planes carrying 89 people took off from Moscow's Domodedovo airport yesterday around an hour apart and bound for two different destinations.’
    • ‘They made sure that they were on the next flight bound for Toronto.’
    • ‘That where he is bound come April 5, when he will attempt to better his brave fourth place in last year's National.’
    • ‘But how many minutes will the bench - bound Italian with the stylised facial hair play against the Koreans?’
    • ‘Oh sure, she was bound for a very good college and was fairly certain that he wasn't, but was it worth it?’
    • ‘The only discomfort was sharing space with at least a couple of passengers bound for the same destination.’
    • ‘The strike also delayed trains bound for destinations on the European mainland.’
    • ‘The group was bound for Greece and other European destinations in the hope of earning a livelihood to support their families back home.’
    • ‘Once again the lorry left Ramsgate aboard the Sally Star bound for Dunkirk.’
    • ‘A passenger, who just arrived at the station and asked for anonymity, was forced by several bus brokers to board a bus which is not bound for his destination.’
    1. 1.1Destined or likely to have a specified experience.
      ‘they were bound for disaster’
      • ‘Any attempt at explaining higher meanings to be derived from Judo is bound for failure.’
      • ‘Obviously, by definition, the destination of education bound trips is always an education centre, which may be situated in a nearby area or at the nearest market centre or town.’
      • ‘Surely many world records are bound to be broken, they think.’
      • ‘While these students are likely not bound for careers in music, they are the future core of the volunteer choir, the town band and the community orchestra.’
      • ‘And so any strategy that's based on going after the leadership alone is bound for failure.’
      • ‘Although we can see that it is bound for failure, it is fascinating to follow its journey.’

Origin

Middle English boun (in the sense ready, dressed), from Old Norse búinn, past participle of búa get ready; the final -d is euphonic, or influenced by bound.

Pronunciation:

bound

/bound/

Main definitions of bound in English

: bound1bound2bound3bound4

bound4

verb

  • past and past participle of bind

adjective

  • 1[with infinitive] Certain to do or have something.

    ‘there is bound to be a change of plan’
    certain, sure, very likely, guaranteed, destined, predestined, fated
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Obliged by law, circumstances, or duty to do something.
      ‘I'm bound to do what I can to help Sam’
      ‘I'm bound to say that I'm not sure’
  • 2[in combination] Restricted or confined to a specified place.

    ‘his job kept him city-bound’
    1. 2.1Prevented from operating normally by the specified conditions.
      ‘blizzard-bound Boston’
      • ‘Traditionally, they are duty bound to defer to the wishes of their parents.’
      • ‘The Department was duty bound to protect the interests of the members who had contributed to this amount.’
      • ‘Then you're duty bound to do the right thing so you just do what you're told and get on with it.’
  • 3[in combination] (of a book) having a specified binding.

    ‘fine leather-bound books’
  • 4Linguistics
    (of a morpheme) unable to occur alone, e.g., dis- in dismount.

    • ‘Also their acoustic duration probably varies more than for other syllables that are bound morphemes.’
    • ‘An analogous account can be given of many of the bound morphemes of English and other languages.’
    • ‘The result is a bound phrase, in the parlance of linguists, that takes its meaning from the context in which it is used.’
    • ‘Thus, the question of whether the syllable status of the bound morpheme may affect the base-suffix segmentation was examined.’
  • 5Constipated.

Phrases

  • bound up in

    • Focusing on, to the exclusion of all else.

      ‘she was too bound up in her own misery to care that other people were hurt’
  • bound up with (or in)

    • Closely connected with or related to.

      ‘democracy is bound up with a measure of economic and social equality’
      • ‘The fortunes of Surrey were naturally closely bound up with the fortunes of London.’
      • ‘Let me warn you to remember that the salvation of your soul, and nothing less, is closely bound up with the subject.’
      • ‘These properties are closely bound up with the unique cultural role and status of books.’
      • ‘The outcome of an act of discipline is closely bound up with how a child experiences that relationship.’
      • ‘An individual's sense of identity is closely bound up with roles he or she plays at home and work.’
      • ‘It's too big a subject - too bound up with who I was, who I wanted to be and who I've become.’
      • ‘In Papua New Guinea the past remains closely bound up with the present.’
      • ‘We are internationalists, and we know very well that our fate is bound up with that of the rest of the world.’
      • ‘The collections are therefore closely bound up with one another and, to some degree, interdependent.’
      • ‘This unbridled opportunism is closely bound up with their own political past.’
      connected with, linked with, tied up with, united with, allied to, attached to, dependent on, reliant on
      View synonyms

Pronunciation:

bound

/bound/