Definition of bother in English:

bother

verb

  • 1[with negative] Take the trouble to do something.

    ‘nobody bothered locking the doors’
    ‘scientists rarely bother with such niceties’
    [with infinitive] ‘the driver didn't bother to ask why’
    • ‘Apparently, no one cared enough about this old house to even bother with locking the door.’
    • ‘Nobody was out, so why bother with trying to find a model?’
    • ‘My companion seemed not to bother with any of the trappings of image which worry other girls of her age and for that her cool image was boosted.’
    • ‘Dont bother asking about the mystery ingredient.’
    • ‘Now that I've finished it, I think it'll be a long time before I bother playing it again.’
    • ‘In fact, by the next election this should all be so automated that I won't even have to bother to show up.’
    • ‘Don't bother with the scenic railway, grumped the driver who picked us up from the Megalong Valley once we'd landed.’
    • ‘Why should you bother investigating alternate insurance coverage for your business?’
    • ‘I didn't bother with the included software, as the drivers were already loaded.’
    • ‘We paid a brief visit to Highland Park, but didn't bother with the distillery tour (when you've seen one, you've seen them all).’
    • ‘Soon, nobody will bother with such outdated languages at all, especially after the Revolution comes.’
    • ‘If you're not having a problem, then why bother seeking advice, right?’
    • ‘I think you shouldn't bother with photos or video.’
    • ‘Why bother to vote?’
    • ‘You thought that some of the volunteers were too much trouble to bother with after you messed them about last year.’
    • ‘They're a link back to the days when nobody bothered to lock their back doors and everyone grew vegetables.’
    • ‘If you can't bother to train, don't bother to race!’
    • ‘Running up the steps, I didn't bother with the keys, just pushed the door open.’
    • ‘Why would I bother to read it?’
    • ‘He found it strange to bother with a lock when there was a hole in the window big enough for a man to climb through.’
  • 2(of a circumstance or event) worry, disturb, or upset (someone)

    ‘secrecy is an issue that bothers journalists’
    [with object and clause] ‘it bothered me that I hadn't done anything’
    • ‘The publisher has attended past award gala events, but only this year's event seemed to bother him, even though there was no change in the format or time devoted to the recipients.’
    • ‘There is so much that could be said about this article, but there is a specific issue that really bothered me.’
    • ‘He permitted himself to think that it was the abruptness of events that bothered him.’
    • ‘It is obvious this issue is still bothering you and until you really let him know how you feel he will always manage to walk all over you.’
    • ‘But the Gateshead Harrier, who finished sixth when he last competed at the championships in 1993, said the early start will not bother him.’
    • ‘Part of the suspicion is of course because it's something that's a new way of doing things, and change always bothers some people.’
    • ‘Although Kenneth's absence did bother him, the circumstances of his father's death were his main concern.’
    • ‘The people who should be providing us with these services are not sensitive enough to the real issues and that bothers me.’
    • ‘Steve Waugh, the Australian captain, commented that the margin of victory did not bother him.’
    • ‘They know what finals football is all about so the occasion won't bother us.’
    • ‘In fact, it's not even the event which has bothered me the most in recent history.’
    • ‘If violence and death bother you, quit reading now please.’
    • ‘This comment, though it might've been different under other circumstances, did not bother me at all.’
    • ‘Those few occasions didn't bother her, although she didn't get anything out of them.’
    • ‘At least her little sister had decided not to let Darla's outburst bother her.’
    • ‘In play therapy it was possible to get clues on the issues bothering the child.’
    • ‘The accident bothered me most because I felt like I had let the team down and I tore up a really fast car.’
    • ‘I don't feel the pressure and the worries don't really bother me too much.’
    • ‘What is bothering me is that issue of lack of moral equivalence.’
    • ‘Wherever I go it's always an event, which actually bothers me because it means I cannot fail that trust, which is in fact a burden.’
    concern oneself, trouble oneself, mind, care, worry oneself, burden oneself, occupy oneself, busy oneself
    worry, trouble, concern, perturb, disturb, disquiet, disconcert, unnerve, fret, upset, distress, alarm, make anxious, cause someone anxiety, work up, agitate, gnaw at, weigh down, lie heavy on
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Trouble or annoy (someone) by interrupting or causing inconvenience.
      ‘she didn't feel she could bother Mike with the problem’
      • ‘I'm sorry to bother you but I wondered if I could speak to you for a moment.’
      • ‘I don't want to bother my parents, they have enough trouble with my sick brother.’
      • ‘They managed this with no fuss and without interrupting or bothering us in any way.’
      • ‘Sorry if I'm bothering you or anything, but after seeing you the other day I've wanted to talk to you.’
      • ‘She saw Nathan with his eyes shut in deep concentration and knew something was troubling him, but chose not to bother him just yet.’
      • ‘And Grace never wanted to bother anybody, never wanted to inconvenience people.’
      • ‘His parents, knowing where they could find him and that he was staying out of trouble, didn't bother him.’
      • ‘I'm really sorry to bother you with this, Katrina.’
      • ‘Sorry to bother you again, but I've just finished Good Omens, a book I've been meaning to read for about eight years.’
      • ‘I'm terribly sorry for bothering you all and for giving you such a fright.’
      • ‘I'm sorry to bother you so late, but I am wondering if I can talk to you, privately?’
      • ‘That would save me the trouble of needing to bother anyone.’
      • ‘I can remember saying to the operator ‘I'm very sorry to bother you but I think my house is on fire’.’
      • ‘Sorry to bother you with such a rudimentary question.’
      • ‘I'm sorry to bother you but there's something I need to ask you.’
      • ‘She kept redialing and the interruptions didn't seem to bother her.’
      • ‘It was a rather rough-looking chap who said, ‘Sorry to bother you but we're in the area and we're selling fresh fish’.’
      • ‘You just need to be a little more relaxed yourself as you go through and not let the additional inconvenience bother you.’
      • ‘The inconvenience did not bother me nearly as much as the attitude with which I was treated.’
      • ‘The motorist felt that my time would be better spent booking the speeding students who were attending the college and not bothering him and inconveniencing him in his motor repairs.’
      disturb, trouble, worry, inconvenience, put out, impose on, pester, badger, harass, molest, plague, beset, torment, nag, hound, dog, chivvy, harry, annoy, upset, irritate, vex, provoke, nettle, try someone's patience, make one's hackles rise
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2[no object, usually with negative] Feel concern about or interest in.
      ‘don't bother about me—I'll find my own way home’
      ‘he wasn't to bother himself with day-to-day things’
      ‘I'm not particularly bothered about how I look’
      • ‘I no longer feel my foot at all, but I'm not too bothered about that.’
      • ‘People who draw power illegally from street mains and other sources are the least bothered about public safety.’
      • ‘However, are any councillors bothered about how things are currently going?’
      • ‘By the time we get back to the good guys, and the main plot, we've been faced with a whole load of characters that we're not really bothered about.’
      • ‘He is an ordinary bloke who is not too bothered about his clothes.’
      • ‘Its owner doesn't seem too bothered about its disappearance, although she is ultimately responsible for its retrieval.’
      • ‘Teachers talk of the growing proportion of pupils who don't want to be taught, and whose parents are not greatly bothered about it.’
      • ‘I'm less bothered about my bus shelter now, though I would obviously prefer there to be a stop there so it would be more convenient to get a bus.’
      • ‘Let somebody else bother about developing young players.’
      • ‘I am not too bothered about the work taking a while to complete.’
      • ‘Don't bother about being modern.’
      • ‘In St Andrews, the tourists don't seem bothered about the weather.’
      • ‘With hindsight, they didn't seem bothered about the suggestion of a relationship, though the timing was awkward.’
      • ‘Don't bother about the trophies because they are just a distraction.’
      • ‘Carl and my sister Michelle never seemed too bothered about travelling.’
      • ‘And worst of all, they don't seem particularly bothered about helping customers find the music they want.’
      • ‘But many children in the city seem not much bothered about this year's school re-opening.’
      • ‘I know I should be a bit distressed by all those arts going up in flames, but somehow I can't get that bothered about it.’
      • ‘The sooner we don't even bother about them, the better.’
      • ‘Some of the older members of the public did not seem too bothered about it.’

noun

  • 1Effort, worry, or difficulty.

    ‘he saved me the bother of having to come up with a speech’
    ‘it may seem like too much bother to cook just for yourself’
    • ‘If you agree with her point of view, it's no bother; if not, it can be difficult.’
    • ‘Everybody was given certainty about that, and there was no fuss or bother, so why did the Government not do the same with regard to the seabed issue?’
    • ‘It could have saved itself all this bother, of course, if it had kept the name in the first place.’
    • ‘He interviews himself, which does save a lot of bother.’
    • ‘Apart from that, the economy can deliver, without much bother, fuss or promotion.’
    • ‘Throughout all the fuss and bother, the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has been quietly going about its work of photographing the entire planet.’
    • ‘They left to find another bus stop because they ‘didn't want any bother or trouble.’’
    • ‘Every year since they have been here they have been in bother but they have stayed out of trouble so far this season.’
    • ‘He said a special gate had been reserved for these fans to enter the stadium without any undue fuss or bother.’
    • ‘We'd save an awful lot of bother if we just took it.’
    • ‘Later, based on this incident and a few others we'd witnessed, my friend and I concluded that avoiding crying saved a lot of bother.’
    • ‘The fuss and bother came after his death in 1994, at the age of 62.’
    • ‘Point-and-shoot cameras are ideal for this kind of photography, because they let you react quickly with little fuss or bother.’
    • ‘In doing that we not only save ourselves a lot of bother but we also gain space in the room and it won't feel anywhere near as crowded as it was going to.’
    • ‘Getting rid of all the fuss and bother or hassle of looking after your contact lenses, it becomes part of the body and it's not an invasive procedure.’
    • ‘A year earlier the players had presented a programme of works by Bach, Vivaldi, and Mozart without any fuss or bother.’
    • ‘I should give some credit to the former Mayor of Auckland, John Banks, who made such a fuss and bother.’
    • ‘A third goal at that stage would have saved Rangers a lot of bother.’
    • ‘A woman who turned 104 last Thursday had just one wish for her birthday - she didn't want any fuss or bother.’
    • ‘I couldn't believe he hadn't done that and saved all this bother.’
    trouble, effort, exertion, strain, inconvenience, fuss, bustle, hustle and bustle, disruption
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1a bother A person or thing that causes annoyance or difficulty.
      ‘I hope she hasn't been a bother’
      • ‘The black marks were a bother.’
      • ‘The truth is, I'd hate to be a bother to her or my son.’
      • ‘She did it without complaining because she didn't want to be a bother.’
      • ‘So our old natures rebel and we let them know in subtle little ways that they are a bother.’
      • ‘Isn’t that uniform a bother to you, with people always coming up to you?” my brother asked.’
      nuisance, pest, palaver, rigmarole, job, trial, tribulation, bind, bore, drag, inconvenience, difficulty, trouble, problem, irritation, annoyance, vexation
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • can't be bothered (to do something)

    • Be unwilling to make the effort to do something.

      ‘they couldn't be bothered to look it up’
      • ‘When you can't be bothered to write but you've got loads of stuff spilling out of your head, you can still share it all with this cool tool.’
      • ‘But if they can't be bothered to find me, why should I make the effort for them?’
      • ‘If you can't be bothered to imagine, let me tell you.’
      • ‘People moan about politics and the state of their world when they are down the pub, but then can't be bothered to use their vote on election day.’
      • ‘Throughout my conversation, she gave such dull and unwilling answers, as if she can't be bothered to talk to me.’
      • ‘If you can't be bothered to become informed about the issues then you don't need to vote.’
      • ‘However, I still find myself reaching for it if I have five minutes to kill or can't be bothered to load up anything else.’
      • ‘I have split ends but can't be bothered to go get my hair cut.’
      • ‘But, I really can't be bothered to put in the effort to finish it.’
      • ‘Although they have everything going for them they can't be bothered to put in the necessary effort to help themselves to fulfil their potential.’
  • hot and bothered

    • In a state of anxiety or physical discomfort.

      • ‘I was decidedly hot and bothered for all the wrong reasons by the time I reached The Wolesey to meet Liz, which possibly added to my feelings of not-fitting-in-ness as I sat in the magnificent surroundings.’
      • ‘I ran for 18 minutes and did 100 sit-ups, but was so hot and bothered - and frustrated - that I called it a day and retreated to a cool, refreshing shower.’
      • ‘As for spider cannibalism, this happens frequently, and usually under different circumstances: Males hot and bothered by comely females will venture forth for the chance to mate.’
      • ‘If you're a squeamish sort, who doesn't get all hot and bothered by blood, guts and gore the way I do, then I strongly suggest you don't click on the link I'm about to show you.’
      • ‘His temper in the office could be fiery and he might seem a bit hot and bothered but deep down he was a softy.’
      • ‘Stanley Kubrick chose to play Nabokov's explosive novel as a black comedy of manners, with James Mason getting all hot and bothered over Sue Lyon's nymphet while Peter Sellers snickers from the shadows.’
      • ‘Having done this, consider the question: should we get as hot and bothered as we have by the phenomenon of politicians hurling insults and taking cheap shots at each other?’
      • ‘For some reason the wire service reporters got all hot and bothered today about the whopping 0.2 percentage point upward revision in second quarter GDP.’
      • ‘The waterfall scene (sari size: postage stamp, wetness: drenched) still gets certain of my relatives hot and bothered even today, and I have to confess that I am not immune.’
      • ‘He was cursing and yelling, but Jess was too hot and bothered to worry about it.’

Origin

Late 17th century (as a noun in the dialect sense noise, chatter): of Anglo-Irish origin; probably related to Irish bodhaire noise bodhraim deafen, annoy The verb (originally dialect) meant confuse with noise in the early 18th century.

Pronunciation:

bother

/ˈbäT͟Hər/