Definition of boringly in US English:

boringly

adverb

  • See boring

    as submodifier ‘the list is excoriated as boringly predictable’
    • ‘Anyway, it's boringly easy to list the sillinesses of this idea.’
    • ‘It's one day until the Christmas Celebration at Brixington in which I'm being a soldier, but it's four days until I get the train back from boringly mild Exeter to freezing Loughborough and it's only nine days until Christmas.’
    • ‘When I became involved they weren't very open, but kept banging on rather boringly about the same old stuff.’
    • ‘For instance, Prokofiev's boringly patriotic 1945 opera adaptation of Tolstoy's War and Peace was taken as using the dramatic defeat of Napoleon in 1812 as an allegory for the Red Army's recent repulsion of the Nazis.’
    • ‘Where once ballet slippers, car shoes, moccasins and brogues were once boringly themselves, now they've somehow interbred, jollied up and produced a new generation of lightened-up fashion ideas.’
    • ‘Applications eventually settled into that standard OS look and feel (Mac, Windows, Unix) which was boringly similar because it needed to be consistent and therefore useable.’
    • ‘Yet, in comparison to the competition, it is boringly ordinary: it's not as intellectually sound as recent academic studies, and it's not as interesting as the popular histories.’
    • ‘I was reading an article the other day in an old film magazine I had lying around which listed the top one hundred best scenes in film and while most were undoubted classics it was boringly predictable.’
    • ‘Perhaps because our everyday choices are so limited and our creative impulses so stifled, we embrace the abnormal because everything else is so boringly predictable.’
    • ‘It was my territory: wilder, more interesting, less boringly formal, where I could indulge my already fertile imagination, and lose myself in elaborate fantasies.’
    • ‘He also complains that special advisers, political appointees of ministers, are taking too many decisions at the expense of civil servants who may produce boringly inconvenient arguments.’
    • ‘The first two prequels were dominated by intergalactic council meetings, trade embargoes, boringly samey action and needlessly complicated plotting, all of which suggests that three films could easily have become one.’
    • ‘I had a boringly respectable career as an actor, you know, but at the age of 30 I just stopped very, very abruptly and it was fine, and I haven't acted since.’
    • ‘Aside from that, she's getting clothes and books from us—clothes because, boringly but truly, she needs them, and books because she will always get books from me, every birthday and every Christmas, her whole life.’
    • ‘As electioneering begins, pollsters are busy questioning voters about their priorities with boringly predictable lists: the economy, health, education and crime.’
    • ‘She admits, ‘I had the most boringly ordinary life, growing up in Dayton.’’
    • ‘He argues that ‘one doesn't want to be boringly predictable, but one should be consistent’; there ought to be about four parts predictability to one part innovation, he says.’
    • ‘He played Chad, a boringly handsome corporate frat boy and hateful emotional fascist who concocts a viciously cruel sexual power game to devastate an unsuspecting handicapped woman from lower down the company food chain.’
    • ‘The questions by now were boringly repetitious and predictable, but they had to be answered, patiently, honestly, candidly.’
    • ‘There, even the most pedestrian of clubs would break the boringly fashionable pattern of faux-punk and Europop with interludes of flamenco.’

Pronunciation

boringly

/ˈbôriNGlē/