Main definitions of bore in English

: bore1bore2bore3bore4

bore1

verb

  • 1[with object] Make (a hole) in something, especially with a revolving tool.

    ‘they bored holes in the sides’
    [no object] ‘the drill can bore through rock’
    figurative ‘his eyes bored into hers’
    • ‘I always thought it was like neutron star material—it would bore a hole completely through you if you got in contact with it.’
    • ‘It bores a hole through armor with so much energy, because it is so heavy, that it spews inside the tank or armored personnel carrier all kinds of bits and pieces of that armor in a ‘spalling’ or shotgun effect.’
    • ‘Just below it, an eight-inch hole was bored through the door and a ventilation fan installed.’
    • ‘Anything—a drill or any other digging tool—that is not secured by a strong anchor into the surface may just be pushed away before the drill actually bores a hole.’
    • ‘It was said that the train bored a hole in the mountain's stomach and rushed through it.’
    • ‘He was staring at a tree that the rock had bored a hole through.’
    • ‘To give a more vivid demonstration of the accuracy of his painting, he bored a small hole in the panel with the baptistery painting at the vanishing point.’
    • ‘They ripped out the palace walls to lay electrical wiring, and they bored holes for the aerial cables.’
    • ‘A hole was bored through the shell of a large surf clam and a thick rope passed through it.’
    • ‘Your teacher will now help you, by inventing some contraption of hot bits of coat-hanger wire, to bore deep holes up from the base of the candle.’
    • ‘It bored four holes from the top of the hill to its base to allow sensitive recording equipment to be lowered inside the mound to provide a 3D image of the hill.’
    • ‘He has a story for each tool he demonstrates, be it a drill that bores square holes or a spill plane.’
    • ‘Feric adapted a drill so that it could bore two holes allowing the probe to seat.’
    • ‘Pipis have to keep an eye out for Didymus, who wants to bore a hole in their shell using both an implement and some acid.’
    • ‘A restoration company removed all the carpets in the single-story, ranch-style home, and holes were bored to dry out the walls.’
    • ‘In the cooler confectionery room Jay bored holes into oranges with a root-cutter.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the head was attached to his body, which as a unit had rented the apartment under hers and had bored a hole in the ceiling for stalking purposes.’
    • ‘Two years ago Christopher had a pallidotomy, where a hole was bored in his skull and brain cells were cauterised.’
    • ‘Your theory is that it might have been a whistleblower on the staff who did not break and enter the premises, was lawfully on the premises, but bored a hole, which you say may or may not be a break and enter.’
    • ‘It bored two drill holes within the licence area but some distance from the Rob Roy field, hoping to find oil which would have been in a new field, but without success.’
    drill, pierce, perforate, puncture, punch, cut
    tunnel, burrow, mine, sink
    make, create, put, drive
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object] Hollow out (a tube or tunnel)
      ‘try to bore the tunnel at the correct angle’
      • ‘Be careful boring the tube any further!’
      • ‘Currently the Thames Tunnel is being bored, enabling the line to emerge near to the Queen Elizabeth II bridge at Dartford.’
      • ‘A new 7.9 mile tunnel was bored, becoming the longest tunnel in the western hemisphere.’
      • ‘At one point, the track looped out into the hallway through two small tunnels bored through the wall.’
      • ‘Apparently they started boring the tunnel from the island towards each side.’
      • ‘I roughly centred it (by eye), and bored the inner diameter for the die (in this case a 25mm diameter metric die).’
      • ‘An enormous circular tunnel was being bored deep beneath the streets to carry high-pressure clean water.’
      • ‘Spain has already bored an experimental tunnel 560 metres long.’
      • ‘The 12.9km Shueishan Tunnel, the centerpiece of the project, was bored through in September.’
      • ‘In fact two tunnels, each about 3 metres wide, were bored from opposite sides of the mountain starting from very rough country indeed.’
      • ‘However, this could be minimized if every tunnel is bored with a road header with extremely strong drill bits.’
      • ‘A hole will be dug at one point and the workers will continue to bore a tunnel at a safe depth.’
      • ‘As it does so, it bores a tunnel the length of and around the existing cable which is thereafter removed and replaced with a new cable.’
      • ‘When boring the inside cavity, use the next size up drill.’
      • ‘Some future civilization bores a tunnel vertically down, through the center of the earth, emerging at the opposite point on the globe.’
      • ‘Ever seen the front of those machines they use to bore subway tunnels?’
    2. 1.2 Hollow out (a gun barrel)
      • ‘Preparations were made to use a 50 million baht budget to bore pipes to drain off the water into the sea.’
      • ‘They used a microchip etching process to bore channels just 20 micrometres wide.’
      • ‘When it arrived, I discovered that every other chamber was bored wrong and would not accept a round.’
      • ‘The cork is moved up and down on the rotating mandrel to get the cork bored out to the correct size.’
      • ‘It should do well in traditionally bored barrels and less so in over-bored barrels.’
      • ‘The barrel is cut off just behind the integral front sight boss and the cut off sight with integral boss is bored out and press fit over the shortened barrel's muzzle.’
      • ‘The barrel is bored out and threaded at breech and muzzle to accept a 17-cal. barrel liner.’
  • 2[no object] Make one's way through (a crowd)

    • ‘So will his cut fastball, which bores in on righthanded hitters and induces grounder after grounder to third base.’
    • ‘When he bores fastballs and sharp breaking pitches into the hands of righthanders, they have trouble getting around on them, even if they see them longer.’
    • ‘The slider is particularly effective against lefthanded hitters because it bores in on their feet.’
    • ‘He expected another fastball, one more merciless sinker that would bore in on him.’
    • ‘He put his head down and began to bore through the crowd toward Mr. Sheratt's house.’

noun

  • 1The hollow part inside a gun barrel or other tube.

    • ‘In addition the barrel bore is hardchrome plated for resistance to corrosion.’
    • ‘The first thing after playing is to mop through the bore of an instrument with one of several special devices that prevent the build-up of humidity.’
    • ‘Most of the accidents I've seen involve a simple bulged barrel due to shooting with an obstruction in the bore.’
    • ‘Being parallel to the bore, the rails offered a mounting solution that aimed the light perfectly.’
    • ‘The oboe, with its narrower bore, redesigned reed, and more refined sound, was developed in France during the mid-17th century.’
    • ‘The reasoning behind this is that the bores of even the finest match barrels, no matter how smooth they appear, contain surface pores that need to be carefully filled with jacket material.’
    • ‘Cylinder alignment is checked by running a special tool called a range rod through the bore and into the cylinder throat.’
    • ‘The inside bore might be 12 in, but the barrels are well over a metre in diameter at the base.’
    • ‘By that time, the dissolving wad residue should make the bore look like the inside of a brick chimney.’
    • ‘The bore of the Browning barrel was mirror smooth from one end to the other.’
    • ‘The Ithaca company did the most extensive development of shotgun slug barrels a number of years ago, and concluded the best accuracy was obtained from cylinder-choked barrels with highly polished bores.’
    • ‘Put the gel on a brass or bristle brush and the inside of the bore is quickly coated with the cleaner, which stays in place without running.’
    • ‘Barrels have ventilated ribs, hard-chromed bores, interchangeable choke tubes (three provided) and lengthened forcing cones to reduce recoil.’
    • ‘Woodwind instrument bores were redesigned to extend their range and improve their tone-quality.’
    • ‘This is a local narrowing of the bore of the tube.’
    • ‘Gun-action was wonderful to watch, but best from a distance, because on three occasions a wire-bound barrel burst when water entered the bore before firing.’
    • ‘Pistol or revolver barrels sometimes have a small ring in the bore caused by getting a bullet stuck and then shooting again.’
    • ‘Plus, the perfect bore of the new barrel would assure topnotch accuracy.’
    • ‘To get a revolver to shoot heart-shaped groups involves a complex relationship of bullets to throats to barrel bores and crowns.’
    • ‘The first, made in 1976, is a vertical cardboard tube surmounted by another with a smaller bore.’
    • ‘Even a small amount of snow, mud, excess lubricant, or grease in the bore can dangerously increase pressure and cause the barrel to bulge or burst when firing.’
    1. 1.1[often in combination] The diameter of this; the caliber.
      ‘a small-bore rifle’
      • ‘Called simply Big-Bore Handguns it has to do with, you guessed it, big bore handguns—which are near and dear to his heart.’
      • ‘The traditional .22 rifle has been replaced by a choice of Browning automatic handgun or sawn-off 12 bore shotgun.’
      • ‘One of the hunters crouched in the bow with a 12 - bore shotgun ready to bring down one of the mallard or teal that flew up at our approach.’
      • ‘Both are very large, stainless-steel, semi-auto big bore handguns.’
      • ‘It is also available as a shotgun in 12 and 20 gauge, and .410 bore.’
      • ‘Two 0.315 bore country-made pistols and two cartridges each were recovered.’
      • ‘The most popular caliber seems to be the 54-bore or about .45 caliber.’
      • ‘He has spoken honestly about the damage a lifetime of shooting big bore handguns has done to his body.’
      • ‘In patients recovering from a stroke who need feeding, a fine bore, soft feeding tube can be passed down under radiological guidance.’
      • ‘Only around 10 centimetres in diameter, the clay pigeon is shot at with 12-bore shotguns.’
      • ‘It can serve as a shotgun, an accurate big bore rifle, a handgun, and even as a flare gun.’
      • ‘At some point he armed himself with a 12-bore pump action shotgun which was capable of holding up to 5 cartridges, and loaded the gun.’
      • ‘Gastric lavage should be performed with a large bore orogastric tube.’
      • ‘In its shotgun line, it has added a 28 gauge and .410 bore to its series.’
      • ‘The 12-bore shotgun was taken during the break-in at the house on March 30.’
      • ‘In recent days, they have been peppered with them as if they were buckshot from a 12-bore.’
      • ‘He allegedly claimed he had a 12-bore shotgun and threatened officers, a bailiff and officials after they turned up to throw him out.’
      • ‘He retreated to bed, lying in the foetal position for hours before heading off to the woods at the back of his house with his 20-bore shotgun.’
      • ‘Let's just say a 12-bore is a noisy weapon in a confined space.’
      • ‘The secret, they say, is to pull the trigger of the 12-bore shotgun the instant the bird is spotted.’
      calibre, diameter, gauge
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2[in combination] A gun of a specified bore.
      ‘he shot a guard in the leg with a twelve-bore’
  • 2

    short for borehole
    • ‘The chairman, Senator Moylan, proposed that the board carry out some test bores to establish that ground conditions are favourable for construction work.’
    • ‘The debris including the bags and the timber was obstructing a good two-thirds of the bore of the culvert.’
    • ‘Lighting control panels are being installed in the portal equipment rooms, in niches along the length of the tunnel, and in the passageways connecting the bores.’
    • ‘Last summer BT began legal action in the US against six companies concerning patents for blowing fibre optic cables down bores and conduits.’
    • ‘The firm wanted to eliminate building mandatory escape cross tunnels between bores, a job requiring tricky ground freezing, says Harnois.’
    • ‘It was taken to Ilam to pump water for domestic supply from an artesian bore near the water wheel to a water tank on a tower beside the homestead.’
    • ‘Despite all the difficulties the two ends of the tunnel bore met as planned in 1916.’
    borehole, hole, well, shaft, pit, passage, tunnel
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English borian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to German bohren.

Pronunciation:

bore

/bôr/

Main definitions of bore in English

: bore1bore2bore3bore4

bore2

noun

  • 1A person whose talk or behavior is dull and uninteresting.

    ‘a crashing bore who tells the same old jokes over and over’
    • ‘But she became too demanding and, if never a bore, tedious and peremptory in her behaviour.’
    • ‘Sure, he's likable, but he's a bore.’
    • ‘She sings like a bore, acts like a bore, is a bore.’
    • ‘When there, I risked being a real bore by showing some Bowie video clips while we ate and got through two bottles of appallingly horrible wine.’
    • ‘At the risk of being a complete bore I feel a strong urge to recount our recent experience as a babysitting tag-team.’
    • ‘The days of desperately trying to escape the clutches of some crashing bore in the corner of a nightclub are long gone.’
    • ‘I think he has simply demonstrated once again why he has become such a crashing bore.’
    • ‘It seemed every woman he went out with was a dud, a bore or just plain stupid.’
    • ‘The film's main character, Mr. Hundert, might or might not be a great teacher (in any case, the film thinks he is), but he's a bore.’
    • ‘The woman who at first so impressed you now seems like a bore who won't let anyone else get a word in edgewise.’
    • ‘I've already lost the will to live, so taking out a few geeky bores really won't trouble me one bit.’
    • ‘Give him a gun and a hot little sports car, and he's a bore just the same.’
    • ‘You always were a headache and you always were a bore.’
    • ‘Robert Crumb he isn't, but that's too bad because watching this obnoxious bore becomes tedious long before the film's 77 minutes run out.’
    • ‘Yes, Matt can sometimes be a bore, but he usually knows when he is boring, and this lends complexity to his character as the series develops.’
    • ‘At a deeper level, it seems to me that he is a world-class crashing bore.’
    • ‘Earl is so enmeshed in his youngest son's identity that he becomes a bore.’
    • ‘Those who have a nice car and go to a club are usually a bore.’
    • ‘She on the other hand is a complete washout and a complete bore.’
    tedious thing, tiresome thing, nuisance, bother, pest, annoyance, trial, vexation, thorn in one's flesh
    tiresome person, tedious person
    drag, pain, pain in the neck, bind, headache, hassle
    pain in the butt, nudnik
    fair cow
    nark
    blighter, blister, pill
    pain in the arse
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[in singular] A tedious situation or thing.
      ‘it's such a bore cooking when one's alone’
      • ‘Will's columns can sometimes be a bore, ripping a social healthcare program here and our educational system's shortcomings there.’
      • ‘Quite simply, the film is a bore.’
      • ‘It's a chore and a bore and it makes me sore not to mention poor!’
      • ‘Too bad attending them can be a complete and utter bore.’
      • ‘While in this day of $1 billion building buys, $60 million seems like a bore, this transaction is eye-catching for a couple of reasons.’
      • ‘The rest of the school day was a bore, so I won't bother going into detail about it.’
      • ‘That notion of filmmaking seemed like a bore then and seems like a bore now.’
      • ‘With all of the reality shows that make TV watching a complete bore, I was glad to finally see something new, fresh, absorbing and entertaining.’
      • ‘What is it about household work that makes people regard it as an utter bore?’
      • ‘I seem to have these spurts of wanting to update everything that's going on and then times when life seems like a bore or a little to overwhelming to update about.’
      • ‘Monotony soon becomes a bore to anyone, so the music teacher should guard against the class period becoming mere routine.’
      • ‘Instead, it's a tedious and meretricious bore, and those are the worst kind.’
      • ‘Levels are well planned out, and the fighting, which can sometimes be a bore, is one of the best things about this game.’
      • ‘But life itself becomes a bore, a drudge, a grind.’
      • ‘My enthusiasm was gone; everything became a bore, a chore, a nightmare.’
      • ‘The course can sometimes be a bore but I find the major subjects quite interesting.’
      • ‘It's like reading the same book over and over again: it becomes a bore.’
      tedious thing, tiresome thing, nuisance, bother, pest, annoyance, trial, vexation, thorn in one's flesh
      tiresome person, tedious person
      drag, pain, pain in the neck, bind, headache, hassle
      pain in the butt, nudnik
      fair cow
      nark
      blighter, blister, pill
      pain in the arse
      View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Make (someone) feel weary and uninterested by tedious talk or dullness.

    ‘rather than bore you with all the details, I'll hit some of the bright spots’
    • ‘He became quickly bored by their talk.’
    • ‘She was rather bored with her life in a small town in East Anglia and there and then decided to sell her house and join her son in New Zealand.’
    • ‘I've ranted merrily about this in the past, and regular readers are doubtless bored silly by my views.’
    • ‘Oh please, Damion, your insults are so dull it bores me.’
    • ‘It's a pretty good story, actually, though I get bored by cards very quickly.’
    • ‘As a sociological experiment, I'm not sure what this showed, other than that I was really bored and sometimes do silly things.’
    • ‘Consequently, when I first worked with David at the Royal Court on his play Under the Blue Sky, I probably bored him silly about this film.’
    • ‘I'll give it a go next week, but imagine that this will quickly bore me.’
    • ‘Whenever a person tries to bore you with endless talk on dull topics and unrelated ones, silence him to encore again by inserting cotton into your ears or listening to songs from a walkman.’
    • ‘The story went that their daughter was bored silly after a couple of days at the resort and cried to get back home to her friends.’
    • ‘It was a personal experience and would probably bore you silly and I don't want to leave you in charge of a computer whilst you're asleep.’
    • ‘Even if it can't kill you, too much niceness can still bore you silly.’
    • ‘I can't put my finger on a single reason but I am rather bored of the whole media bias trip that so many US bloggers are on as well the shouty style adopted.’
    • ‘Both quickly bored me, although one generated views realistic enough to cause car sickness.’
    • ‘I was bored, and those silly ninnies you call scullery maids are no fun at all.’
    • ‘It made no sense and I was bored silly, just waiting for it to end so we could get on with the scheduled video.’
    • ‘For the same reason detailed descriptions of food rather bore me: either be there, doing it, having it, eating it, or get a life.’
    • ‘Cancer and Virgo would both find it hard to cope with your aloofness, whilst Aries would quickly bore you once the superficial attraction had passed.’
    • ‘Of course, it should be known that the scene will bore me quickly.’
    • ‘His education hasn't started yet, so he has some kind of notion that life could be more interesting, but no idea of how, and meanwhile he is rather bored.’
    be tedious to, pall on, stultify, stupefy, weary, tire, fatigue, send to sleep, exhaust, wear out, leave cold
    bore to tears, bore to death, bore out of one's mind, bore stiff, bore rigid, bore stupid
    turn off
    hebetate
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • bore someone to death (or to tears)

    • Weary (a person) in the extreme.

      • ‘I've purposely stayed away from reading much about postmodern theory, and most everything I have read just bored me to tears.’
      • ‘Many of our old friends have admitted that since the war they have found it hard to settle down to the old routine and that there are often times when they are bored to tears.’
      • ‘I guess I've avoided this hot topic until now mostly because it bores me to tears.’
      • ‘The most relevant fact about reporters on that plane is that they are bored to death.’
      • ‘If all of you have not been bored to death and fallen asleep on the keyboard by now, I really do admire your resilience.’
      • ‘‘If we were bored to death, honestly I don't think we would do it,’ he said.’
      • ‘Please, you're boring me to tears here: wrap that ring in a performing pigeon and maybe we'll have a deal.’
      • ‘It's about getting you from here to there without scaring you to death, boring you to tears, or intimidating your socks off.’
      • ‘And despite the fact I have seen many wonders, the likes of which you can only dream about, I'll not be boring you to death with them.’
      • ‘That way you can skip stuff that bores you to tears and get straight to the meaty heart of my writerly goodness.’
      • ‘I've logged on and tried a couple of chat rooms but they were boring me to tears.’
      • ‘I don't like doing it, it bores me to tears, and the money, which is good, still isn't worth the time it takes.’
      • ‘If you find that your job is boring you to death or you find a better opportunity, you can quit your job and change with no problems.’
      • ‘She is really a nice lady and I know she is bored to death.’
      • ‘American politics—at least the election cycle—bores me to tears.’
      • ‘How do you extol the value of hard work and personal sacrifice to today's kids without boring them to tears?’
      • ‘He talked a lot about how the money markets work, but kept checking that he wasn't boring me to death.’
      • ‘The children might not learn very much, and they might be bored to tears, but at least they would be safe.’
      • ‘And lately most of my arguments have been with like-minded friends, and this bores me to tears.’
      • ‘So, have I bored you to tears yet, with all this talk about weather?’

Origin

Mid 18th century (as a verb): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

bore

/bôr/

Main definitions of bore in English

: bore1bore2bore3bore4

bore3

noun

  • A steep-fronted wave caused by the meeting of two tides or by the constriction of a tide rushing up a narrow estuary.

    • ‘On the Shubenacadie River, the tidal bore and rapidly rising tide results in extremely turbulent waters.’
    • ‘Experiments in a laboratory wave tank show that interactions between bores refracted by a prowlike beach can produce jets in which the velocity is nearly twice the bore's phase speed.’
    • ‘The Severn Bore is one of Britain's few truly spectacular natural phenomena.’
    • ‘The longtime Brazilian bore aficionado achieved an unbelievable record of surfing non-stop for 10.1 km (6.3 miles) down Brazil's famous river bore wave, called the Pororoca.’
    • ‘The largest bores occur on 25 days a year, in the morning and evening, with biggest bores on tides over 32’.’
    • ‘The bore corresponds to a tidal wave that appears at the same time that the tide comes up.’

Origin

Early 17th century: perhaps from Old Norse bára wave; the term was used in the general sense billow, wave in Middle English.

Pronunciation:

bore

/bôr/

Main definitions of bore in English

: bore1bore2bore3bore4

bore4

Pronunciation:

bore

/bôr/