Definition of borage in English:

borage

noun

  • A herbaceous plant with bright blue flowers and hairy leaves, used medicinally and as a salad green.

    • ‘Coriander, oregano, camomile, and borage are both blue and white flowered and if happy self-seed all over the place.’
    • ‘Edible flowers such as nasturtium, calendula, and borage do well at the base.’
    • ‘Some 3 percent of all flowering plants produce these chemicals, including such herbal-garden favorites as borage and comfrey.’
    • ‘Collect herb flowers such as borage and chamomile just before full flowering.’
    • ‘Candied borage flowers make beautiful decorations for cakes and pastries, and it's easy to do.’
    • ‘Sprinkle with chopped mint or coriander and some bright petals - calendula, borage, courgette flowers or anything edible.’
    • ‘The motorway verges and embankments have been sown with wildflower seed which are now producing traditional meadow plants, including borage, primula and oxeye daisies.’
    • ‘The wild olive is a member of the borage family that matures to about 20 feet in height and has a rounded crown on a short trunk.’
    • ‘We've got hawthorn, gingko, elder, mullein, lavender, sage, thyme, echinacea, borage, yarrow and plenty of pine trees.’
    • ‘If you experience the redness and flaking of chronic dry skin, dermatitis, and eczema, get to know borage oil, extracted from the borage plant.’
    • ‘Painted Ladies, which instinctively lay their eggs on thistle plants, also find an acceptable substitute in the hairy leaves of borage.’
    • ‘Other flower petal choices are rose, nasturtium, borage, dandelions and violets.’
    • ‘I haven't yet done anything with my borage because, well, neither the flowers nor the leaves taste like much of anything, and the stalks are stingy and unpleasant to the touch.’
    • ‘Try fennel for the Anise Swallowtail; lupine for blues; hollyhocks and borage for the Painted Lady; and grasses for satyrs and skippers.’
    • ‘Begin planting borage or marigold with your potatoes and notice the difference it makes.’
    • ‘This oil is derived from the seeds of the borage plant.’
    • ‘Imagine my delight then when I popped into the organic shop and saw not only bountiful bags of salad but salad with flowers, the edible kind like nasturtiums, borage, wild pansies and pot marigolds.’
    • ‘Adventurous herbalists like to experiment with basil, oregano and rosemary, also including the more exotic plants like sweet woodruff, lemon grass and borage.’
    • ‘A member of the borage family, common heliotrope is one of about 250 Heliotropium species, but it is the only one widely grown in gardens.’
    • ‘This is simply an extension of the local habit of continually wandering about tweaking bits of tasty food off the hillsides: wild asparagus, mushrooms, fennel, borage, wild garlic, lemons.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French bourrache, from medieval Latin borrago, probably from Arabic.

Pronunciation:

borage

/ˈbôrij//ˈbärij/