Definition of boozy in English:

boozy

adjective

informal
  • Intoxicated; addicted to drink.

    ‘the boozy and drugged-out wreckage of his later years’
    • ‘In a sample of 12 foreign visits, boozy councillors and officers drank their way through £1,060 of alcohol and spent £430 on phone calls.’
    • ‘That's when Icelandic rap shares the bill with boozy jug music from the '70s.’
    • ‘Once you've had your fill of boozy friskiness, cool down with a visit to Aros, the city's brand-new museum of modern art.’
    • ‘When we first see the rooster, he's gargling some water, and he's bleary-eyed; obviously, he just got up after a long boozy night.’
    • ‘It doesn't have the boozy recklessness of the harder Stranger's Almanac, nor does it have the delicate emotional fragility of Heartbreaker.’
    • ‘Smooth, sophisticated, and with a slurpability that belies its richness, it is subtly sweet and, needless to say, very, very boozy.’
    • ‘For many students, that translates into four years of late nights, pizza banquets and boozy weekends that start on Wednesday.’
    • ‘Yet the story's emotional center is Evangeline's boozy husband, Warren Slote, a soul-ravaged World War II veteran.’
    • ‘In her twenties she worked as a director of a property company in London, existing on coffee, Danish pastries, convenience foods and long boozy lunches.’
    • ‘He plays a boozy, washed-up lawyer who takes an 18-year-old legal whiz kid under his wing.’
    • ‘‘Every sign has its keynote flavours,’ she says of the idea, which ‘came out of a boozy lunch with the manager’.’
    • ‘A drunken man who attacked a black cab after a boozy night out has been ordered to pay £648 in compensation.’
    • ‘After such a vivacious, boozy evening you'd think I'd have fallen asleep the moment my head hit the pillow.’
    • ‘A lifestyle of heavy drinking became ingrained, and was made worse by his working environment, where boozy lunches were the norm.’
    • ‘Nowadays drinking in most workplaces is frowned upon, and the boozy culture of Westminster increasingly appears a dangerous anachronism.’
    • ‘In hindsight, the boozy requiem wasn't just for Hindery, but for an era.’
    • ‘It's quite a dark comedy and anyone who's ever been on a boozy night out in a club like this will recognise the characters.’
    • ‘If, back on that boozy tour in 1993, someone had told us that we would one day be mobbed outside that hotel after winning the World Cup, we would probably have bought him a pint, slapped him on the back and told him he was a very, very funny man.’
    • ‘The friend you invited to your boozy Christmas lunch is a recovering alcoholic.’
    • ‘A mum today launched a campaign to hammer home the dangers of binge drinking after her schoolboy son nearly died following a boozy night out.’
    • ‘And why shouldn't they have been boozy philanderers?’
    • ‘She admits to the odd bout of boozy indulgence like the rest of us.’
    • ‘Anyway, First Step is slightly darker and less boozy in tone than the later Faces albums are, but that's not to say that it's either dark or sober, because it sure ain't.’
    • ‘‘Sideways,’ the Oscar-winning film about two buddies touring the central California wine country on the eve of the wedding of one of them, is one long and boozy man date.’
    • ‘The plans, which include curtailing boozy social events and offering better support for students with drink problems, contrast with the heavy drinking culture prevalent among students in Scotland's medical schools.’
    • ‘Legend has it that an actor came up with the name at a boozy New Year's Eve party in 1936.’
    • ‘It was only after Ava Gardner shoved him into a black sea of despair that Frank was able to transform from a washed-up bobbysox warbler into the undisputed master of the boozy saloon ballad.’
    • ‘In place of a posturing virile hero, Sayles presents a boozy social recluse, the first in his lowlife parade of outsiders.’
    • ‘Afterward, he heads for a downtown bar, a den of boozy young people being assaulted by rust-belt karaoke singers.’
    • ‘However, a mention of the conundrum during a boozy dinner party provoked an interesting and lively debate, so perhaps you might also like to raise the matter over the Sunday roast.’
    • ‘It's a boozy punk stew that doesn't even sound like the same band who would within a few years record Let It Be or Tim.’
    • ‘Anthony Cronin's telling portrait of the time, Dead as Doornails, portrays the boozy pub-centred milieu as a place where the attitude and drinking seemed nihilistic and alcoholism and underachievement were rife.’
    • ‘I suppose she's right, I think, as I leave Harris Manchester College for a delicious and boozy lunch on the High Street with my distinguished student.’
    • ‘Maybe once a year, at Christmas parties and such, he talks to Marianne - boozy, sociable conversations that, strangely, he finds himself thinking about later.’
    • ‘It will take decades—at least—for any serious dent to be made in Britain and Scotland's boozy culture.’
    • ‘Churchill and I, in repeated cycles, suffer through the classic three stages of happy hour: boozy bonhomie, injurious repartee, then schmaltzy reconciliation.’
    debauched, dissipated, riotous, carousing, revelling, roistering, uproarious, unruly, intemperate, unrestrained, uninhibited, abandoned
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Pronunciation

boozy

/ˈbuzi//ˈbo͞ozē/