Main definitions of boot in English

: boot1boot2

boot1

noun

  • 1A sturdy item of footwear covering the foot, the ankle, and sometimes the leg below the knee.

    ‘walking boots’
    • ‘There doesn't seem to be much rhyme or reason to the shoes, sandals, boots, and flip-flops I see people wearing.’
    • ‘Wear chemical-resistant boots or footwear during most mixing, loading, and application jobs.’
    • ‘Apulia, the heel of Italy's boot, is beautiful, affordable - and not overrun with tourists’
    • ‘She was wearing a white dress, which came pass her knees; she wore no sandals, boots, or footwear of any kind.’
    • ‘You will need to wear sturdy footwear, preferably boots, old warm clothes including waterproofs, and bring a packed lunch.’
    • ‘On his feet he was wearing some sturdy walking boots and a few pairs of woolly socks.’
    • ‘The footwear line especially the boots are trendy, some are waterproof.’
    • ‘The girl was wearing leather ankle boots and the guy was wearing sneakers.’
    • ‘For a similar look, try a pair of cap-toe ankle boots on for size.’
    • ‘And it's got all of his dress shoes and his boots and his tennis shoes.’
    • ‘Which is to say, rubber boots are the footwear of choice.’
    • ‘We recommend walking shoes or boots rather than sandals for this walk as it is over uneven ground in places.’
    • ‘For a smart casual look, you can don a stylish pair of elongated, pointy ankle boots.’
    • ‘Gauntlets were strapped onto his hands and wrists, and sturdy boots were on his feet.’
    • ‘Complete the look with a pair of dark brown biker boots or a stylish pair of vintage sneakers.’
    • ‘All are garbed in casual street wear, their large feet clad in brand-name boots or sneakers.’
    • ‘This winter's stylish footwear, from ankle boots to sneakers, will have you praying for more days of snowfall.’
    • ‘Most soldiers were issued only normal field jackets, not parkas, and leather boots, not footwear suitable for snow.’
    • ‘All players must have proper footwear, football boots or trainers.’
    • ‘Other than that, his feet were shod in sturdy dark grey boots, and he had nothing else.’
    gumboot, wellington, wader, walking boot, riding boot, field boot, jackboot, thigh boot, half-boot, ankle boot, pixie boot, chelsea boot, balmoral, desert boot, moon boot, snow boot
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A covering or sheath to protect a mechanical connection, as on a gearshift.
      • ‘Once the center panel is removed, use a screw driver to remove the four screws attaching the base of the shift boot to the center console.’
      • ‘What's the best way to repair a boot on your gear shift that has come loose?’
      • ‘Replace a worn shift boot or add color and style to any interior with Wheelskins Genuine Leather Gear Shift Boots.’
      • ‘My original gear shift boot is cracking, peeling and full of holes.’
      • ‘Remove the lower shift boot from the shift lever.’
    2. 1.2 A covering to protect the lower part of a horse's leg.
      • ‘Before using splint boots it is important to understand how to put them on properly.’
      • ‘How to take care of a horse using leg boots.’
      • ‘These boots are essential for horses competing in stressful events such as barrel racing, show jumping, cross country jumping, etc.’
      • ‘Protect your horse's legs from our large selection of horse boots!’
      • ‘Sometimes the front and hind-leg boots of the same set are different in shape.’
      • ‘Horse boots and bandages are a category that has been increased as equestrians are requesting more specialized products.’
      • ‘After unloading Frankie from the float, she gave him one last brush, then put his saddle, bridle and boots on.’
      • ‘My horse has short canon bones and I found the hind boots quite long, but the fore leg boots fitted a treat.’
      • ‘Is the overwhelming variety of horse boots confusing to you?’
      • ‘These trailering boots are unsurpassed in protecting your horse's legs from the knees to the heels.’
    3. 1.3historical An instrument of torture encasing and crushing the foot.
      • ‘The torture of the boot was considered by contemporary observers to be the ‘most severe and cruel pain in the world’.’
      • ‘In Hugo's novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame, the character of Esmeralda is tortured using the boot.’
      • ‘Sometimes the boot was heated until red hot during interrogation, a reference to this practice is found in Grimm's fairytales.’
      • ‘Alternatively, the boot could be filled with cool water and then heated over a fire.’
    4. 1.4US A clamp placed by the police on the wheel of an illegally parked vehicle to make it immobile.
      • ‘I walked out to my car, grabbed the Denver boot notice off the windshield, and went inside to call the parking people.’
      • ‘Someone made off with a Denver boot vehicle immobilization device placed on a vehicle parked on the 500 block of Bannock Street between Oct. 2 and Oct. 8.’
      • ‘Chicago officials say the threat of the Denver boot has convinced more than 23-hundred parking ticket defulters to pay up.’
      • ‘Now, not only do you have to pay the boot fee plus parking ticket fees, you have to type in the code in the Denver Smart Boot, and then take it to a drop off location!’
      • ‘The standard Denver boot is designed to fit vehicles that have a flat rim face.’
  • 2informal A hard kick.

    ‘I got a boot in the stomach’
    kick, blow, knock
    View synonyms
  • 3British The trunk of a car.

    • ‘For so large a vehicle, the boot is relatively small.’
    • ‘Include the rear boot for a combined 260 litres of storage space.’
    • ‘Two in the front, two in the back, and one in the boot (or should I say ‘trunk’)!’
    • ‘Since the start of the year, police have recorded the theft of 30 spare wheels from the boots of cars.’
    • ‘If the boot is full of luggage - two of you are away for a weekend - then that has to be removed to make space for the punctured tyre.’
    • ‘The new car also carries a Fix and Go puncture repair kit, that is a compressor unit and a powerful puncture repair liquid, which is carried in the boot.’
    • ‘Squeezing a fifth person in would have been tight and the boot space was a little skimpy.’
    • ‘The arrangement was for the heroin to be left in the boot of a car in Brussels in exactly the same way as before.’
    • ‘I was going to stop and show him what was in the boot but I thought better of it.’
    • ‘It is hoped a new law will stop cases like the alligator found in the boot of a car.’
    • ‘I've made ample use of the boot space itself, and even managed to squeeze a dining table and four chairs in the back, which was rather impressive.’
    • ‘The vehicle, which has yet to be approved by the car manufacturer's board, will be a saloon with four doors and large boot and is intended initially for Asia and China.’
    • ‘The officer then got the jack from the boot of the vehicle, jacked it up and released Phillips.’
    • ‘This gives a well-sized boot and interior that can carry four adults comfortably.’
    • ‘The dimensions are slightly larger inside and out and there's also more space in the boot.’
    • ‘He had a white carrier bag out of the boot and he put it through the window.’
    • ‘The boot space takes the luggage of a family of four, excluding quad bikes.’
    • ‘Plus there's a colossal boot, loads of space inside, extremely comfortable seats and a genuine sense of quality.’
    • ‘When we got home we took the stuff out of the boot and carried them to the house.’
    • ‘You don't want to be ripped off by a bootlegger who sells pirate copies from the boot of a car.’
    • ‘The Pottages opened the boot of their car, at the very least appearing to ignore the claimant who continued to address them.’
    • ‘We were carrying the engine of a World War II Hinkle bomber in the boot (trunk).’
    • ‘As a luggage carrier, the boot provides 490 litres of space, and with the rear seats folded down there is a class-leading 1,694 litres.’
    • ‘Most of the length is the far side of the rear wheels, meaning the boot is truly massive.’
    • ‘Police stopped the vehicle early yesterday morning and found a number of items in the boot of the vehicle.’
    • ‘Marsden was there and the boot of his vehicle was open.’
    • ‘The only real upside to this penny-pinching is the extra space in the boot.’
    • ‘Do not leave property inside the vehicle, even in the boot or under the parcel shelf.’
    • ‘A full-size spare wheel is under the boot floor.’
    • ‘A piece of tow rope of identical composition was found in the boot in a bag in a Rover motor car which the appellant's father had bought in April 2001, after the robbery.’
    • ‘There are head restraints in the back (although these can impede rear visibility when parking) and the backs of the rear seats adjust to give more space in the boot.’
    • ‘The boot holds a reasonable amount of soft luggage - those infernal golf clubs might fit in and you still have the suitcase shelf behind the seats.’
    • ‘The fabulous build quality continues on the inside - passengers cannot grumble about space and the boot is big and box-shaped.’
    • ‘He left behind a number of other valuable items, which were locked in the boot of the vehicle.’
    • ‘Set the seat as far back as it will go, and you are rewarded with a veritable ocean of knee-room in the back for such a compact car, but with limited space in the boot.’
    • ‘He would then take off his overalls and keep them in the boot of his car.’
    • ‘We were wrestling and both fell onto the car boot.’
    • ‘The security guard was alone at the time and while he was on the ground the robbers pulled money boxes out of the boot of his vehicle.’
    • ‘Fill the car with people and the boot will struggle to carry their luggage; a roof box is the best solution’
    • ‘So that would be an explanation for the contamination in the boot of the car but not an explanation for contamination anywhere else.’
    • ‘There are similar patches of tape on the hood and on the trunk, the boot of this vehicle.’
  • 4usually as modifier The process of starting a computer and putting it into a state of readiness for operation.

    ‘a boot disk’
    • ‘Make a DOS floppy boot disk, and have the configuration program for each card handy on floppy.’
    • ‘How far into the boot process is the machine when you get this message?’
    • ‘As you can probably tell by the loud buzzing and whirring sounds your computer makes when you turn it on, the boot-up process puts a lot of strain on your system.’
    • ‘It's like setting Windows in hibernation mode so that it doesn't have to go through the entire boot-up process when it's called upon.’
    • ‘This is a setting in your system BIOS setup, which you can access during the boot process.’
    • ‘He switched it on, and watched as the screen flashed as the machine went through its boot-up procedure.’
    • ‘It includes a system monitoring tool and utilities to change the boot-up image and to update the BIOS.’
    • ‘I'm already going to assume you already know some of the basics, like backing up your stuff, and making a DOS boot disk.’
    • ‘Look for a data recovery software package that has a boot disk option available.’
    • ‘There are dozens of options - one lets you log on automatically at boot-up, convenient for cable and DSL modem users.’
    • ‘Is it possible to turn off the kernel boot-up messages?’
    • ‘Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised’
    • ‘I mentioned in my article how I liked the fresh new look and the faster boot-up time.’
    • ‘Custom configurations are not stored when powered off and must be loaded at boot-up (which can be automated easily).’
    • ‘I figured, however, that what he perceived as a significant decrease in the notebook's speed was actually the long boot-up time.’
    • ‘Always take the opportunity to make a boot diskette when Linux gives you that option.’
    • ‘A common way to access these settings is to press the F2 or delete button during the first few seconds of a boot-up.’
    • ‘Passwords have even found new niches in the form of boot managers, remote login formats and advanced security systems.’
    • ‘Several manufacturers are now doing this, and it is definitely a nice touch away from the DOS boot disk and flash utility of old.’
    • ‘For example, some viruses infect executable code in the boot sector of floppy disks or in system areas of hard drives.’
    • ‘This versatility was enhanced by the system's inherent stability, robust and usable map package, and rapid boot-up capability.’
  • 5US Military
    informal A navy or marine recruit.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1usually as adjective bootedPlace boots on (oneself, another person, or an animal)

    ‘thin, booted legs’
    • ‘The metal floor clanged monotonously with each fall of Rick's booted feet.’
    • ‘If you're on the lookout for xenophobia next week, keep your ears open for the sound of booted feet marching towards the nearest hostel for immigrants.’
    • ‘I didn't hear anything else come out of the phone because Carl's booted foot located it and crushed it.’
    • ‘He rubbed his booted foot in the pebbles on the walk, and waited with his eyes downcast.’
    • ‘As the massive log burned down, he'd raise a booted foot and shove the log a little farther into the fireplace.’
    • ‘The booted, foul-mouthed, razored men are nothing matching you.’
    • ‘Jefferson, warned in time, booted and saddled for an escape.’
    • ‘And then, of course, there's the regular beating with fists and booted feet.’
    • ‘The sound of booted feet advancing towards him erased any further thought.’
    • ‘Snow crunched beneath his booted feet, every so often spotted by a few drops of blood like an eerie set of tiny footprints.’
    • ‘The sheikh and his immediate family members are pushed to the ground with a booted foot and held there at gunpoint.’
    • ‘Their passage was next-to-silent, Anne's booted feet muffled by the thick emerald carpets.’
    • ‘The two men crashed into each other and tumbled along the dirt to the sounds of shouted orders and the stomp of booted feet.’
    • ‘She is mid thirties and angular, chewing gum and bouncing a booted foot, with her arms tightly folded across her flat chest.’
    • ‘Mat could see her through the door glass, standing with her hand on the knob as the clutch of booted and hatted pursuers came up the porch steps.’
    • ‘Repeating the action, his gaze settled on Ikeda's booted feet.’
    • ‘Before they could blend into the crowd however, a booted foot smashed brutally into Riane's knee and sent her tumbling to the ground with a startled cry.’
    • ‘So y'all leave the house suited and booted, neat and complete from the head to the feet.’
    • ‘A booted foot prodded the lady in the side, and she awakened with a start, looking, perhaps understandably, somewhat frightened.’
    • ‘Propping his booted feet on the polished table, he matched Shanza's stare with a bright, shrewd one of his own.’
  • 2Kick (something) hard in a specified direction.

    ‘he ended up booting the ball into the stands’
    • ‘The kids would boot that ball as hard as they could into the lot of them!’
    • ‘When York kicked off by booting the ball straight out and then giving away a first-minute penalty for offside, things looked bleak.’
    • ‘Jackson then had the honour of booting the final points of term - the conversion going in off an upright to the loudest cheer of the night.’
    • ‘He began to get some decent mounts and started booting home winners regularly.’
    • ‘They shoved the door open - kicking it, booting it, shoving three or four times, and as they shoved the door open I put the knife through the gap.’
    • ‘He could have allowed it to run for a goal kick or even booted it into the stand.’
    • ‘Each time she missed, Jesse taunted her again, until Amber was so angry with him that she booted it the hardest she ever had.’
    • ‘Callaghan bounced up and ecstatically booted the ball as hard as he could amid wild celebrations which were something to behold - for those still able to watch.’
    • ‘Things got worse when a dropped home pass was booted down the other end for Roundhegians to kick a second penalty and close the gap to two points.’
    • ‘Lewis converted three of the tries, as well as booting a first-half penalty.’
    • ‘He's a pretty decent punter, having booted nine of eleven punts inside the 20-yard line in 2002.’
    • ‘They booted another two goals while a resolute navy unit kicked one more to end the game with an average of one per quarter.’
    • ‘He was so frustrated in extra time that he took to booting a plastic cup from the dugout.’
    • ‘He sailed the world in the mad destructions of his mind but they found him out and started booting his door in at night.’
    • ‘Our sons have already decided that ‘bathrooms are boring’, and are amusing themselves by booting the back of the driver's seat.’
    kick, punt, bunt, strike with the foot, tap
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1boot someone off Force someone to leave a vehicle unceremoniously.
      ‘the driver booted two teenagers off the bus’
      • ‘Not to worry, we can stay here until they boot us off.’
      • ‘She adds an encryption so they cannot boot her off the site.’
      • ‘He lasted ten minutes before the coach booted him off the pitch and made him watch from the side.’
      • ‘The guard took great pleasure in explaining that if he did, just how much he would relish booting them off the site.’
      • ‘As the national guard boots them off their fertile land to make room for foreign investment, the armed rebels point automatics at their heads and kick them back.’
      • ‘Nikko does have a lot of fans, and there were a lot of people who thought that he had been booted off too early.’
      • ‘I'm warning you; mind your mouth or I'll boot you off the estate.’
      • ‘Charity volunteers thought they were given their marching orders when the council booted them off their usual patch.’
      • ‘He sat next to her on the bed, nervous of whether she'd boot him off or not.’
      • ‘Crew members booted them off the plane in Washington D.C. for their drunk and disorderly behavior.’
    2. 2.2boot someone outinformal Force someone to leave a place, institution, or job unceremoniously.
      ‘she had been booted out of school’
      • ‘Politicians generally don't understand the immorality and illegality of their acts, till they are booted out of power.’
      • ‘If they break the law they will be booted out of the country.’
      • ‘Didn't we already have one of those in the first season and he was booted out very quickly.’
      • ‘Little did he know that one of the first political uses of this transforming technology would be facilitating a way to boot him out of office.’
      • ‘Are they going to boot him out of office if he doesn't march in step?’
      • ‘But just a year later, with the economy in tatters, he was booted out of office by a little-known state governor named Bill Clinton.’
      • ‘This is distressing because it marks phase one of the scheme to boot me out of my own ‘study’ and turn it into a nursery.’
      • ‘Firms hired to improve hygiene will be told to clean up their act - or they will be booted out.’
      • ‘Once in, the members must follow certain protocols of interaction (either directly or indirectly enforced) or they are booted out.’
      • ‘But now the community dance club claim the fact they did not patrol the door for a short spell on December 13 is being used as an excuse to boot them out.’
      • ‘Far from booting them out, we want to welcome everyone on board.’
      • ‘He believed he was ‘untouchable’ but his victims finally became sick of the yob and helped a specialist council unit to boot him out of their neighbourhood.’
      • ‘It has threatened to boot England out of the tournament if the violence reoccurs.’
      • ‘If Davis is booted out, it will more or less become accepted fact that he was an inept governor.’
      • ‘Well, that's the term they use when they boot someone out.’
      • ‘There will be no international commitment to pursue if she is booted out of office.’
      • ‘If you don't like the lot in power, you have this chance to boot them out.’
      • ‘Let me get in the door before you boot me out again.’
      • ‘Suddenly some authority is booting him out, in what he sees as bloodymindedness.’
      • ‘How much evil is the current government going to inflict on our world before we wake up and boot them out?’
      dismiss, give someone their notice, throw out, get rid of, discharge
      View synonyms
  • 3Start (a computer) and put it into a state of readiness for operation.

    ‘the menu will be ready as soon as you boot up your computer’
    no object ‘the system won't boot from the original drive’
    • ‘Little black books don't have to be booted up, email programs and cell phones have their own address books, and the internet is one big phone book anyway.’
    • ‘You will be surprised to see how fast your system boots this time.’
    • ‘While booting up her PC, she doodled on a small pad of paper.’
    • ‘If all of the physical components are OK, the next thing is to see if it will boot from a floppy or CD.’
    • ‘So now you know that these tools are available when you boot from the Installer DVD.’
    • ‘Modern motherboard chipsets will boot from a CD-ROM more easily than a floppy diskette.’
    • ‘Calmly, I unplugged both hard drives and tried booting it.’
    • ‘Then the infected floppy disks may infect other computers that boot from them, and the virus copy on the hard disk will try to infect still more floppies.’
    • ‘Instead of booting from the hard disk, your computer will now boot from the floppy and a menu will appear.’
    • ‘When power's restored, the server cannot even boot up to its welcome or logon screen.’
    • ‘If you're successful, your system will boot up and give you a login screen.’
    • ‘If you boot up expecting to see photo-realistic landscapes, then you're going to be disappointed.’
    • ‘One day I got a call from a girl who tells me her laptop won't boot up.’
    • ‘Choose one of the icons, and it'll boot up the title screen of the game in a couple of seconds.’
    • ‘Which is faster, getting through airport security or booting your computer?’
    • ‘For instance, if I took an already working boot disk and just burn that to a CD, would it boot the computer?’
    • ‘The humming sound of machinery booting up filled the room, and Cameron knew what was happening.’
    • ‘Both of these attacks can be easily subverted by booting the affected computer from a CD-ROM.’
    • ‘Secondly, oftentimes when I boot up my PC, the monitor will remain completely blank.’
    • ‘You have to hit the Connect button before you boot up your computer.’
    start up, fire up, prepare, ready, make ready
    View synonyms
  • 4US Place a Denver boot on (an illegally parked car).

    • ‘If any number of tickets are not paid within 30 days of being issued, the vehicle will be booted.’
    • ‘So here we go: my car got booted, and I'm simply beside myself!’
    • ‘So let me get this straight: A car was booted because it had too many outstanding tickets.’
    • ‘Vehicles that block dumpsters will be subject to being booted and/or towed.’
    • ‘At the time I was booted, I was parked legitimately.’
    • ‘The car of a resident student was ‘booted’ while parked in Lower Science Lot as a result of six unpaid parking tickets.’
    • ‘Murph's car got booted today in the municipal lot for repeated parking violations.’

Phrases

  • boots on the ground

    • informal Ground troops who are on active service in a military operation.

      ‘they could have gone to their allies and got more boots on the ground’
      ‘while he backs high-tech warfare, he also sees boots on the ground as essential’
      • ‘Ultimately, putting boots on the ground is the infantry's reason for being.’
      • ‘The best contingency planning in the world has continually shown that there is no substitute for actual boots on the ground.’
      • ‘Those with "boots on the ground" must understand the political situation and be able to control the tactics and sentiments of their companies, platoons, squads, and fire teams.’
      • ‘We need all the boots on the ground that we can assemble.’
      • ‘The best way to mitigate risk is with more boots on the ground, meaning never patrol dismounted with less than a platoon.’
      • ‘And the general's going to be getting some boots on the ground here in the coming days to make a firsthand assessment, to see how things are going.’
      • ‘You've got to have boots on the ground.’
      • ‘Again, the course of action depends on the number of boots on the ground.’
      • ‘The revolutionary transformation of modern military forces has not reduced the need for boots on the ground.’
      • ‘The sooner we get our boots on the ground, the sooner we will complete our mission.’
      • ‘The equation between timing, training, and boots on the ground still doesn't work.’
      • ‘And you wonder why you're not seeing more food, more water, more response, more boots on the ground, coming in and assessing the situation and helping.’
      • ‘'It's boots on the ground that win battles - individual soldiers, not people sitting pushing buttons in fancy machinery,' he says.’
      • ‘There just aren't the boots on the ground there.’
      • ‘These missions require "boots on the ground" in sizable numbers, although air power would still serve as a powerful supporting arm.’
      • ‘It was only after having boots on the ground that a realistic and practicable plan could be further developed.’
      • ‘Boots on the ground is what they need most right now.’
      • ‘Those boots on the ground are almost all armed and in a dangerous situation.’
      • ‘The signs were there that we needed to have more boots on the ground.’
      • ‘We will figure out what the right combination of boots on the ground may be.’
  • die with one's boots on

    • Die in battle or while otherwise actively occupied.

      • ‘He would die with his boots on, ‘having known not… bitterness nor defeat.’’
      • ‘If you wanted to die with your boots on, you went with an agency.’
      • ‘I'm a third-generation Texan, inheritor of the ‘die with our boots on’ culture, and I do have a handgun license.’
      • ‘The horse ‘died with his boots on’ by dropping dead during a training session at his stables in Liardet Street in New Plymouth.’
      • ‘‘This is my way of giving back to society what it has given to me,’ says the young and energetic officer, who admittedly would like to die with his boots on.’
      • ‘Like most good actors, some day I hope I die with my boots on.’’
      • ‘Some, however, died with their boots on - like Oklahoma's Bill Pickett who was kicked in the head by a horse while working on the largest ranch in the Sooner State.’
      • ‘But if I gotta die, and I'm beginning to doubt I do, then I reckon it's better to die with my boots on.’
      • ‘The few experienced generals who had managed to die with their boots on were probably adequate to the task.’
      • ‘He has been with the boat from the beginning and intends to ‘die with his boots on’ in her service.’
  • get the boot

    • informal Be dismissed from one's job.

      • ‘That's why I was hired in the first place, but I can't really say whether I left or I got the boot.’
      • ‘With it, the trend of sending online e-greetings is now slowly getting the boot, as it is definitely much more convenient to send SMS.’
      • ‘The best way to win a fight is to know your strengths, and if you're a tenant getting the boot from your landlord, then your strengths are your rights.’
      • ‘‘It's an abuse of human rights,’ says the man, who lived in his apartment for 22 years before getting the boot.’
      • ‘Well Jennifer got the boot, when in a previous show, she got the highest votes.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, it came down to only one winner, and the other got the boot.’
      • ‘Four contestants were handed their walking papers, and here's a recap of who got the boot.’
      • ‘The man who had miscalculated got the boot.’
      • ‘Anyway, they were down to three women and white-trash gum-chewing girl got the boot.’
      • ‘Well, he got the boot after a series of mediocre interviews.’
  • give someone the boot

    • informal Dismiss someone from their job.

      • ‘She knows what she did was wrong and I have spoken to her about it but I am not giving her the boot from the band.’
      • ‘Despite her colleagues unanimously deciding to give her the boot, with nobody standing on her side, she kept her head held high.’
      • ‘Plenty of less understanding women would give you the boot.’
      • ‘After giving half-hearted efforts for the NBA season so far to emphasize his point that he wanted out we finally gave him the boot.’
      • ‘Unless his own party decides to give him the boot, credible alternatives don't exist.’
      • ‘Please practise what you preach or we will give you the boot!’
      • ‘She caught him fooling around and gave him the boot.’
      • ‘Other members of the tribe gave him the boot because his physical prowess made him a threat to their own ambitions of scooping the £1m prize.’
      • ‘The court heard that they gave him the boot because his amphetamine habit made him very unpleasant to work with.’
      • ‘Technically, they didn't give her the boot until she wrote a follow-up about requiring passports from ‘suspicious-looking swarthy males.’’
      • ‘Swindon Council will investigate the complaints, and can take court action to give them the boot.’
      dismiss, give someone their notice, throw out, get rid of, discharge
      View synonyms
  • with one's heart in one's boots

    • In a state of great depression or trepidation.

      ‘I had to follow her with my heart in my boots’
      • ‘I opened my computer with my heart in my boots.’
      • ‘The team left Alicante with their heart in their boots, knowing that an unforgettable period in their lives was behind them.’
      • ‘With my heart in my boots, I climbed inside; opening the window leading to the mainplane and viewed the damage caused by the unsupported wing.’
      • ‘Be prepared to finish the night with your heart in your boots.’
      • ‘Gethryn hurried along the familiar streets with his heart in his boots sometimes, and sometimes in his mouth.’
      • ‘Connie sat and listened with her heart in her boots, as Field was filling petrol.’
      • ‘I went to this conference with my heart in my boots.’
  • you (can) bet your boots

    • informal Used to express certainty about a situation or statement.

      ‘you can bet your boots that patrol has raised the alarm’
      • ‘So, if you don't do something different, soon and often, you can bet your boots that the competition will.’
      • ‘If such a clinical study existed then you can bet your boots that they would have published it in full.’
      • ‘It takes about 6 minutes for this and you can bet your boots you will see a prize-winning photograph pass you right by during this time.’
      • ‘Maybe they listen to the radio, but you can bet your boots they're doing something.’
      • ‘Even if we don't consider ourselves an ‘emotional’ person, you bet your boots our past and present feelings steer our lives.’
      • ‘And you can bet your boots that I'm going to try to incorporate every good idea I see into my next book, too.’
      • ‘In other words, if you really need or want the information you're hearing, you bet your boots you'll listen.’
      • ‘If it's not those fancy new shoes they're wearing, you can bet your boots they didn't prepare properly before hitting the slopes at the weekend.’
      • ‘And you can bet your boots I'm going to see if I can get special concessions for it.’
      • ‘And of course you can bet your boots that these are the first, but many other MS-tools are to follow.’
  • one's heart sank (or fell) into one's boots

    • Used to refer to a sudden onset of depression or dismay.

      ‘the way your heart drops to your boots if your foal has terribly crooked legs’
      • ‘My heart sank into my boots.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse bóti or its source, Old French bote, of unknown ultimate origin.

Pronunciation

boot

/but//bo͞ot/

Main definitions of boot in English

: boot1boot2

boot2

noun

in phrase to boot
  • As well; in addition.

    ‘images that are precise, revealing, and often beautiful to boot’
    ‘he is a likable guy, and funny to boot’
    • ‘This was a day-trip into the darker corners of immortality and isolation with a slab of comic humour to boot.’
    • ‘He did, and with a budget that only afforded him a two-to-one shooting ratio to boot.’
    • ‘It is therefore a building of great historical importance, and a beautiful building to boot.’
    • ‘Come on, we chide, they can't have all the wealth, status and talent to boot.’
    • ‘And to top it off someone straight bought him one off his wish list to boot.’
    • ‘This track at least has a warm, beating heart to it - and hooray, it's a toe-tapper to boot.’
    • ‘The A-class is most exciting, with many of the old model's flaws addressed and a new interior to boot.’
    • ‘We don't know where our next broadband is coming from, and I'm off work until the middle of next week, to boot.’
    • ‘They claim it promised enough money to see the club through the season, and international players to boot.’
    • ‘But he was obviously a good player and, far more importantly, a good guy to boot.’
    • ‘I didn't really expect that so that was a definite bonus, and the new songs they played sounded pretty cool to boot.’
    • ‘If he tried that he'd lose his catch and hook, line and sinker to boot.’
    • ‘You can calm everyone else's merriness, and, to boot, you can direct the taxi home.’
    • ‘I would say that this sort of behaviour deserves a ban and a compulsory course in responsible driving to boot!’
    • ‘But it's a nice wee place, and is dead posh to boot, so it's survived pretty well.’
    • ‘He is an unprecedented acting talent that deserves a look or seven, and maybe even a few awards to boot.’
    • ‘Oh, and there's a gardener's cottage at the back of the building to boot.’
    • ‘Initially I was disappointed at having chosen a stalls seat, and one right at the front to boot.’
    • ‘And now these pundits have returned the favour by giving him his own book and glowing reviews to boot.’
    • ‘So they managed to find her another court, indeed a better one to boot.’
    as well, also, too, besides, into the bargain, in addition, additionally, on top, on top of that, over and above that, what's more, moreover, furthermore
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English bōt ‘advantage, remedy’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch boete and German Busse ‘penance, fine’, also to better and best.

Pronunciation

boot

/but//bo͞ot/