Definition of boor in US English:

boor

noun

  • An unrefined, ill-mannered person.

    ‘at last the big obnoxious boor had been dealt a stunning blow for his uncouth and belligerent manner’
    • ‘He is a smug, self-pitying boor who turns the caring doctor stereotype on its head.’
    • ‘I thought him to be a boor - coarse and crass, involved only in his immediate needs.’
    • ‘I almost had him filed under arrogant boor, but then I caught him out being nice.’
    • ‘Adrian is a boor and worse, and Lichi finds refuge at Andrew's place.’
    • ‘But with every passing week, he continues to carve himself a reputation as a baseball reactionary, a boor and a bore.’
    • ‘I suppose you have a few groups of such boors you spend time with regularly?’
    • ‘His sister is married to a boor whom he has always loathed and suspects she has come to loathe also.’
    • ‘Don't become hostile - in addition to looking like a boor you will probably alienate your patients.’
    • ‘Obviously, a man who makes unwanted contact with a woman is a boor and maybe even a criminal.’
    • ‘Joe excepted, the movie industry folks are immoral, money-grabbing, cell-phone-using boors with big paychecks and bad attitudes.’
    • ‘And he shows that he can play something other than a loudmouthed boor.’
    • ‘Fans of studio politics everywhere understand that while Harvey's a boor, Bob is merely churlish, and boors hardly ever stand down for churls.’
    • ‘I don't imagine that I'll ever have the courage to take direct action against these types of boors, but I certainly appreciate those who do.’
    • ‘Those who are delighted by the cathedral of Chartres and the Meninas of Velasquez may think that those who remain unaffected by these marvels are boors.’
    • ‘In the middle of my musings about medieval rapture, I heard a cell phone ring, and a man, who soon turned out to be a big boor, answer it.’
    • ‘Marler's braying boor is funny but way over the top.’
    • ‘The insinuations that he was a cold fish who never talked with players and sometimes conducted himself as a tactless boor are not true.’
    • ‘I daresay you will roast me as a sexist boor, but there, I've said it.’
    • ‘There are three counts in my indictment: he was a humourless boor, he was the epitome of negativity and his legend far outstrips his actual achievement.’
    • ‘She was almost certainly better-bred and better-mannered, and equally forthcoming when it came time to put boors in their place.’
    • ‘It will save you from being thought an uneducated boor.’
    • ‘They see the boor in each of them and they laugh at it.’
    • ‘But I call such a man a boor, an illiterate, a savage.’
    • ‘Call me irresponsible, call me obsessed, call me a boor.’
    • ‘In Tampa, players who now are among his best friends once considered him a boor and a punk.’
    • ‘He gushes that millionaires come out of the ranks of undereducated free agents, but I've met a number of them, and sorry, they are, to a person, boors.’
    • ‘That's the kind of enthusiast that is being driven into oblivion by self-serving, loudmouth boors who think that they invented the microprocessor.’
    • ‘Mrs. Wilson wrote our names on her clipboard and told us sharply, ‘We are not a nation of boors.’’
    • ‘He tries to insinuate himself into her world, but she's not interested in a boor who thinks he can buy his way into her circle.’
    • ‘He describes the behavior of these insufferable boors.’
    • ‘Then, some sordid boor decided to interrupt the peace.’
    • ‘Thus, after several months' exposure, the office boor who initially took two weeks to annoy you can accomplish the same feat in only seconds.’
    • ‘When you were the defending champion the next year, you were criticized by the British press for showing up late to a function and acting like a boor.’
    • ‘He and those three sons of his are ill-mannered boors, louts and womanizers.’
    • ‘‘He's an obnoxious, self-righteous boor who didn't want anyone to ruin his precious ball,’ Violet answered sulkily, idly surveying her fingernails.’
    • ‘And Junior interrupted him, ‘Because we don't like to put up with a bunch of party boors.’’
    • ‘It might have been about having a choice between behaving like a sportsman or behaving like a boor and doing the latter because it suited him at the time.’
    • ‘The next day, Kate informed David in no uncertain terms that he was an insensitive boor.’
    • ‘Such rote interpretative strategies betray a lack of imagination, like the cocktail-party boor who laughs at every wisecrack.’
    • ‘You know, sweetie, people who resort to swearing are boors.’
    • ‘He may be a lecher and a boor, but his class is never in question.’
    lout, oaf, ruffian, hooligan, thug, rowdy, bully boy, brawler, rough, churl, lubber, philistine, vulgarian, yahoo, barbarian, neanderthal, primitive, savage, brute, beast, monster
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘peasant’): from Low German būr or Dutch boer ‘farmer’.

Pronunciation

boor

/bo͝or//bʊr/