Main definitions of boom in English

: boom1boom2boom3

boom1

noun

  • 1A loud, deep, resonant sound.

    ‘the deep boom of the bass drum’
    • ‘At that moment the deep boom of the great brass bell reverberated through the monastery.’
    • ‘I heard someone yell as a loud boom sounded behind them.’
    • ‘The deep boom of a gong echoed through the room, and the gathered students fell silent.’
    • ‘Far above us, the grey clouds got sick of threatening and decided to act, and a hollow boom of thunder sounded.’
    • ‘My heart froze, skipped a beat, and then began to go boom boom boom.’
    • ‘Right on cue, a resounding boom rolled throughout the school, followed by distant cheers.’
    • ‘It sounded like a boom, it sounded actually like a big bomb.’
    • ‘A thunderous boom suddenly sounded from miles away, accompanied by a miniscule quake.’
    • ‘For a gang who loves strings and builds and sweeping vocals, the monotonous boom boom boom was a disappointment.’
    • ‘They sat in a thoughtful moment before a boom of thunder sounded and Jane jumped.’
    • ‘As they drew closer to Sara's there was a loud boom and a cracking sound.’
    • ‘But their presence is signalled by an unmistakable call similar to bellowing of a bull with a deep, resonant boom that carries up to a mile.’
    • ‘He said: ‘Suddenly I heard boom boom boom boom boom and heard an officer shout ‘man down, man down’.’’
    • ‘The windowpanes rattled, and the girls could feel the subsonic boom of a bomb exploding.’
    • ‘It was new, but it was back to that disco beat for me: boom boom boom boom.’
    • ‘But around 8: 30 I heard something different: big booms and dull thumps.’
    • ‘And finally you hear nothing but boom boom boom boom, and all the whooping.’
    • ‘Lightly she tapped on the wooden door to hear the deep boom of her father's voice tell her to enter.’
    • ‘There was a deep boom, then the sound of rending metal and breaking glass, and still it didn't stop.’
    • ‘Without warning, a loud boom resounded from the city.’
    reverberation, resonance, resounding
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The characteristic resonant call of the bittern.
      • ‘And Doncaster will hopefully soon be ringing with the boom of bitterns crying out for mates.’
      • ‘He reported that bitterns were beginning to practise their boom on the reserve again but would not find their full voice until April or May.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Make a loud, deep, resonant sound.

    ‘thunder boomed in the sky’
    ‘her voice boomed out’
    • ‘The ground began to shake violently, as the sound of large engines boomed in the sky.’
    • ‘Inside, it was colder than I had expected, shiver-cold, and the smallest sounds echoed and boomed, hitting my ear like a fist.’
    • ‘The tall elegant man boomed out from a central balcony.’
    • ‘She listened to your heart beat and it boomed out over a loudspeaker.’
    • ‘Techno music boomed out across the court as we jogged on the spot.’
    • ‘She called louder but still nothing responded except the sound of the thunder that boomed in the sky.’
    • ‘A loud sound boomed out like that of a giant bell, when one is inside it.’
    • ‘The intro to the first song boomed out from the speakers.’
    • ‘From beneath the mask, a deep voice boomed out, in a singsong voice, the following rhyme.’
    • ‘Suddenly, I heard the sound of thunder booming all about outside.’
    • ‘A chime from somewhere deep inside the Sanctuary boomed out seven deep notes: fifteen minutes to the next class.’
    • ‘Just as his fingertips grazed the knob, a loud clap of thunder boomed and the wind sent branches from a menacing tree outside clapping into the window pane.’
    • ‘The large ship lowered down, as the megaphone boomed out a cry from three different voices.’
    • ‘He only focused on the song that boomed out on the loudspeakers.’
    • ‘Machinegun fire and explosions boomed out and helicopters clattered overhead as naked children ran for safety, screaming.’
    • ‘A barely contained energy surged through the crowd; it appeared to ripple as slogan after slogan boomed out across the open space.’
    • ‘Suddenly a deep voice boomed out from some of the trees nearby.’
    • ‘The thunder and lightning boomed and crashed above them for a while and then it started to rain.’
    • ‘A few seconds later, the royal fanfare boomed out through the room.’
    • ‘It was a sight to see the inmates showing interest in the proceedings and enjoying the heavy bass of music that boomed out through speakers.’
    reverberate, resound, resonate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with direct speech Say in a loud, deep, resonant voice.
      ‘the imperative “Silence!” boomed out by Ray himself’
      • ‘Sabrina's normally soft voice changed to the slightly familiar commanding tone as she and her mother boomed out ‘HO!’’
      • ‘Veronica Sky walked out and the deep voice boomed again: ‘Please take a seat Mr. Taylor.’’
      • ‘Maud boomed out in a low, greeting voice, ‘Come in, come in!’’
      • ‘‘Ahem, may I have your attention please,’ a loud voice boomed over the restaurant.’
      • ‘‘Kaseios,’ his loud voice boomed across the hall, just like it used to, and Euthenas was no longer terrified, but comforted.’
      • ‘As they went downstairs to the lockers, a familiar voice boomed an enthusiastic ‘hiya Matt’ from behind him.’
      • ‘‘Warren word power, that's what it's called’ a loud voice boomed, and Rabbit popped his head above the bank, holding a paw over his nose.’
      • ‘‘You killed my best friend,’ the shadow boomed in a deep voice.’
      • ‘‘Don't get around this neighborhood too much,’ the man boomed out, startling Ruth.’
      • ‘Hope was getting dim when a deep voice boomed, ‘Children of the Earth, get out of the way!’’
      • ‘She boomed out again, ‘Morgan forsook me and for it he shall feel my wrath’ She slowly turned a bit, letting the pleasing look about her drop.’
      • ‘‘I told you Barnay, your plow won't be finished until the day after next,’ a deep voice boomed.’
      • ‘Charles' laughter boomed out and he said, ‘We are going to show you to your rooms.’’
      • ‘‘So, the fair lady is finally awake,’ the same deep voice of the captain boomed.’
      • ‘‘Dearly Beloved’, the elderly minister started, his voice loud and booming across the abbey with the mike.’
      • ‘‘She was a wonderful, beautiful ambitious woman and she will be missed,’ his deep voice boomed between sobs.’
      • ‘‘Enter through here, please,’ a security guard boomed out from the other end of the cafe.’
      • ‘The answer came quickly as the boss boomed out, ‘Aircraft on cat 1, you have a tailpipe fire.’’
      • ‘‘Wah ha ha’, boomed the voice as it echoed along the corridor.’
      • ‘‘I am here because I want to listen, but I also want to ask you some questions,’ Sir Hilary's voice boomed over the demonstration.’
      bellow, roar, thunder, shout, bawl, yell, bark
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 (of a bittern) utter its characteristic resonant call.
      • ‘I've heard Bitterns booming a few times at Leighton Moss, but I can only imagine what Minsmere sounds like on a spring evening.’
      • ‘The date of the first booming bitterns varies each year, although there has been a trend towards them starting to boom earlier in recent years.’
      • ‘Leighton Moss, a premier RSPB reserve where you can hear bitterns boom, is a lovely walk away over the crag.’
      • ‘There is a sexual bias in that only male Great Bitterns boom; we have no data on the survival of adult females.’
      • ‘I was lucky enough to visit Minsmere and Dunwich Heath last week and there seemed to be Bitterns booming everywhere, although I didn't actually see one.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb): ultimately imitative; perhaps from Dutch bommen ‘to hum, buzz’.

Pronunciation

boom

/bum//bo͞om/

Main definitions of boom in English

: boom1boom2boom3

boom2

noun

  • A period of great prosperity or rapid economic growth.

    ‘a boom in precious metal mining’
    as modifier ‘a boom economy’
    • ‘Once central banks embark on an aggressive program of monetary expansion, the stage is set for an inevitable boom and bust.’
    • ‘In periods of capitalist decline the crises are of prolonged character while the booms are fleeting, superficial and speculative.’
    • ‘A property tycoon today flagged up a series of multi-million pound projects designed to spark a business boom in Monks Cross.’
    • ‘Some dealers credit the new wealth, while others say their sales were unaffected by the economic boom and bust.’
    • ‘It turns out the dot-com boom and bust aren't just anomalies of runaway capitalism.’
    • ‘Irish investors are expected to spend up to €6 billion on overseas property this year as profits from the economic boom flow into Europe.’
    • ‘This added 1.5 per cent to economic growth in the boom years of the 1990s.’
    • ‘Thailand is relying on rising exports and a consumer-spending boom to double economic growth this year.’
    • ‘As we know from countless business cycles, what that leads to is a boom and bust cycle.’
    • ‘The British economy has suffered greater booms and deeper busts than the eurozone economies over the past few decades.’
    • ‘The government is trying to cool an investment boom that stoked economic growth of 9.1 per cent last year, the fastest pace in seven years.’
    • ‘The equivalent would be to increase the number of working hours per person in periods where the economy booms.’
    • ‘The growth figures suggest Ireland may recapture some of the form of the boom years when economic growth peaked at 11.5 per cent.’
    • ‘Entire epochs of capitalist development exist when a number of cycles is characterized by sharply delineated booms and weak, short-lived crises.’
    • ‘Over the last decade the economic boom has resulted in billions of euro being invested in property, both at home and abroad.’
    • ‘That was a novel about the boom years of the 80s, which now seem lost in the explosion of tinsel that characterized the boom of the 90s.’
    • ‘Most of the unsound lending that characterized the boom was done directly in the market rather than by banks.’
    • ‘Venture capital investments have slowed since the internet boom and bust in which many funders lost money.’
    • ‘All this leads to economic boom and prosperity.’
    • ‘Such borrowers are marginal to the fixed-capital investment that drives economic booms.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Enjoy a period of great prosperity or rapid economic growth.

    ‘business is booming’
    ‘the popularity of soy-based foods has boomed in the last two decades’
    • ‘In the days when the Dutch economy was booming and stock prices were soaring, shareholders weren't worried.’
    • ‘The mixed economy boomed, bringing unprecedented prosperity to the middle and working classes.’
    • ‘Its middle class is growing rapidly, domestic consumption is booming and the growth of its manufacturing sector is nothing if not spectacular.’
    • ‘Most likely, as long as the economy was booming and the economic rewards were big enough, her employees would have endured her management style.’
    • ‘Our technology, financial services and pharmaceutical businesses boomed.’
    • ‘Business was booming, but experienced craftsmen were becoming increasingly difficult to find.’
    • ‘The recent U.S. experience demonstrates that booms can last a long time, but not forever.’
    • ‘And the insurance business boomed as well, selling peace of mind and security.’
    • ‘The U.S. labor market was booming until an economic downturn began in 2001.’
    • ‘That, of course, did not mean the business cycle was dead or that the stock market would boom endlessly.’
    • ‘While economies boom, the financial foundation could not be more precarious.’
    • ‘All three economies are currently booming with growth rates of around 7 percent.’
    • ‘We've seen, basically, five quarters where we've seen growth booming.’
    • ‘Car valeting companies across the country claim business is still booming, although some companies in the crowded Dublin market are starting to feel the pinch.’
    • ‘With almost every sector booming with growth, resources are not an issue.’
    • ‘Business is far from booming, but at least there are signs of progress.’
    • ‘As he flies about his meat processing empire in his jet monitoring developments below, the beef baron's business is booming.’
    • ‘When the economy is booming, this problem never arises.’
    • ‘However, as economic times continue to boom, private label growth has occurred in the lower-income consumer demographic.’
    • ‘Equally, rates could rise to high single digits if world peace was in jeopardy or economic growth boomed.’

Origin

Late 19th century (originally US): probably from boom.

Pronunciation

boom

/bum//bo͞om/

Main definitions of boom in English

: boom1boom2boom3

boom3

noun

  • 1A spar pivoting on the after side of the mast and to which the foot of a vessel's sail is attached, allowing the angle of the sail to be changed.

    • ‘The sails were all furled in tight bundles around the various booms, and a lantern gleamed with white light on the bowsprit.’
    • ‘We had been flying slower than 100 knots most of the day because our hoist boom was extended.’
    • ‘Engineers used a computer-controlled boom pressurization system to initiate deployment of the boom and sail system.’
    • ‘The sail is left fed into the boom and mast so all you have to do is pull it up.’
    • ‘He shut off the motor and untied the sails from the booms.’
    • ‘So a sheet is a rope, a tack is a turn into the wind and the boom is the spar along the bottom of the sail.’
    • ‘Sonia waited until he was within three feet of her, then jumped up on the boom, running lightly towards the mast.’
    • ‘The wind caught the sails with a dull boom and the ship heeled about, tacking into the westerly breeze sweeping across the lake.’
    • ‘There was speculation that he might have been struck by the boom and thrown overboard as he changed the sail.’
    • ‘The fire resulted in heavy damage to both the interior of the vessel and the exterior cabin area, plus damage to the mast, boom and rigging.’
    • ‘The wooden boat, valued at around $2000, had two sails and a boom but no mast.’
    • ‘Tying a rope to the wheel and to a pole to keep the vessel on course, Jake swung himself onto the boom and beginning to furl the sails himself.’
    • ‘I recognized it as the boom of a sailboat, with pieces of the sail torn on it.’
    • ‘Only the creak of the mast and the boom, the rippling of the sail and the gurgling of the passing water reached Miri's ears.’
    • ‘He bundled the sails over the booms and tied them into ungainly lumps, then went to the wheelhouse.’
    • ‘We then come to the mast's boom that has broken into two pieces over the ship's hull.’
    • ‘The boat took considerable damage in the storm, losing its mast, boom, compass and lifelines.’
    • ‘As Miller approached the helm looming before her, a quick glance at the boom and rigging was a reminder of the vessel's size.’
    • ‘Walking or running behind the sail holding on to the boom helps students get the feel of flying the sail.’
    • ‘She has a square sail on two booms, which I shall see is fully repaired, and there is little else to do to make her ready.’
    1. 1.1often as modifier A movable arm over a television or movie set, carrying a microphone or camera.
      ‘a boom mike’
      • ‘It had a camera on a boom arm and they were swinging it over and around the car which was following a short distance behind.’
      • ‘No studio, no financing, no known actors just a cameraman, boom man, front man, and some extras.’
      • ‘When he finally arrives, cameras line up in front of questioners and the boom mike circles the room, smacking writers in their heads.’
      • ‘Joe Wetsch said into the mike boom that was suspended in front of his mouth.’
      • ‘A boom mike swings into the picture as the film's faked reality shatters.’
      • ‘For example, you may not see the boom microphone on the left side of your shot until you are looking at the video in the video editing program.’
      • ‘If the projectionist bungles the job, subtitles will run off the bottom of the screen, actors' heads will be cut off, or boom microphones will bob into the frame.’
      • ‘Lucy pointed, too, and made some gurgles, and even patted the boom mike while the cameras rolled.’
      • ‘The supporting cast of cameramen, photographers and the people who hold the fluffy sound booms, made it impossible to move, as they jostled for the best positions.’
      • ‘Four beats after curtain rises, bump downlights to full wattage; they're boom lights rigged to the top of the stage.’
      • ‘Once the overhead boom microphone had moved out of the way, she stepped forwards.’
      • ‘Because I don't think that I'm any better than the camera operator, the boom man, I don't think that I'm any better than you are.’
      • ‘The area was awash with boom mikes and satellite dishes.’
      • ‘Essentially, it is just a set of headphones and a boom microphone, plus the software that enables you to talk to others online.’
      • ‘Any time they go out in public, there's a boom mike hanging over them, there's a camera on them, there's tape recorder all around them.’
      • ‘It resembles a small one-sided headphone with a small boom microphone, and comes in a bluish-grey and silver metallic colour.’
      • ‘Spoken parts used to be recorded on the acting sets with boom mikes, but this is no longer done.’
      • ‘For example, if a cheer goes up at the appearance of the boom operator's credit in a movie, this means that his or her family is in attendance at the screening.’
      • ‘Already the media was on the scene, in the building, hanging boom microphones and video cameras out the windows on either side of the woman.’
      • ‘He then took a headset down from a clip above him, and pulled the boom microphone around his chin to his lips.’
    2. 1.2 A long beam extending upward at an angle from the mast of a derrick, for guiding or supporting objects being moved or suspended.
      • ‘The boomspray also features a hydraulic wing off the boom which allows farmers to spray over fence lines.’
      • ‘A 60-meter long boom was extended from the side of the Shuttle and two types of radar frequencies were beamed down from each end of it.’
      • ‘A portable boom control device and cable hook assembly is used for loading and unloading.’
      • ‘Two systems are used to control boom stability.’
      • ‘The sensors are located at the end of a boom attached to a yoke that rotates 360 degrees in the horizontal plane.’
      • ‘It was supported on a long boom so that the top of it did not run through the radio dish.’
      • ‘The crane had an angled boom, so the engine moved down one inch for every inch we pulled out.’
      • ‘A boom hinged to the bottom of a mast to create a simple crane for loading and unloading cargo.’
      • ‘At its center is a mixing console and an expensive microphone suspended from a boom.’
      • ‘The left joystick controls steering direction and travel speed, while the right joystick controls boom lift and attachment tilt functions.’
    3. 1.3 A floating beam used to contain oil spills or to form a barrier across the mouth of a harbor or river.
      • ‘When the council advertised it said suitable candidates must have between 10 and 15 rowing boats, a motor launch, a river boom and be suitably qualified in life saving.’
      • ‘The Council was alerted by local residents on Thursday morning and managed to subdue the flow of diesel into the river by installing a boom.’
      • ‘The total length of the boom will be around 200m, with high-visibility pellets at 5m intervals.’
      • ‘The contractors sent out an oil spill response team with booms to contain the spillage and absorbent pads to soak the oil up.’
      • ‘A boom was used to stop the foam travelling down the river.’
      • ‘Crews with First Strike Environmental arrived Tuesday evening and have been working to absorb the fuel with booms and pads.’
      • ‘Kochi was among the first ports to procure an oil spill containment boom in 1987.’
      • ‘Officers from the Environment Agency stretched a number of booms across the river to contain the diesel and prevent it from travelling further downstream.’
      • ‘Our bays and inlets could be protected by floating booms and where they exist, by closing sluice gates,’ she said.’
      • ‘The operator is also required to provide a boom across the river to stop boats approaching the weir.’
      • ‘If all was clear, the boom was opened and you sailed out.’
      • ‘A boom has been placed around the stricken vessel.’
      • ‘Large floatation devices such as sausages - known as oil booms - line the river to contain the fuel.’
    4. 1.4 A retractable tube for inflight transfer of fuel from a tanker airplane to another airplane.
      • ‘The primary air fuel transfer method is through the tanker's flying boom, controlled by an operator stationed at the rear of the fuselage.’
      • ‘At its peak, the effort involved 14,000 vessels, 8o aircraft, better than 500,000 feet of boom.’
      • ‘Nearly all internal fuel can be pumped through the tanker's flying boom, the KC-135's primary fuel transfer method.’
      • ‘Workers not experienced in working with today's long-reach boom pumps may not think about it beforehand.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the general sense ‘beam, pole’): from Dutch, ‘beam, tree, pole’; related to beam.

Pronunciation

boom

/bum//bo͞om/