Definition of boogie in English:

boogie

(also boogie-woogie)

noun

  • 1A style of blues played on the piano with a strong, fast beat.

    • ‘He played some fantastic boogie-woogie piano, then fell off the piano stool and was sick on the floor.’
    • ‘And not just R and B, but funk, blues and boogie-woogie - Turner shows his versatility and mastery at every turn.’
    • ‘Fats invented the boogie-woogie piano style later used ubiquitously by early rock-n-rollers like Jerry Lee Lewis.’
    • ‘Some boogie-woogie piano, some Japanese pop, some Frank Sinatra.’
    • ‘Eastwood explains: ‘The first thing he showed me was how to play boogie-woogie.’’
    • ‘There are workshops on boogie-woogie piano and acoustic and electric guitar.’
    • ‘I can't imagine him incorporating boogie-woogie or rock.’
    • ‘He indulges in doo-wop, rhythm and blues, boogie-woogie and Euro-classical paradigms.’
    • ‘Jools Holland and his 18-piece Rhythm and Blues Orchestra will play their boogie-woogie, honed over 15 albums and two decades, on July 2.’
    • ‘I particularly admired his performances of J. P. Johnson's stride pieces, boogie-woogie, and of his own works for organ.’
    • ‘There's as much boogie-woogie in its movements as conga and tango.’
    • ‘Here, you find everything from 12-tone to boogie-woogie, neoclassic to blues, and neo-romantic to completely abstract constructions.’
    • ‘I mean, Paul's about as close to an original as you can get without being one, but if I really want to hear some great boogie-woogie, I'll go to the source, thanks.’
    • ‘His earliest influences were boogie-woogie, blues and swing.’
    • ‘He is still Jones's hero, and Holland has always loved boogie-woogie piano.’
    • ‘Then, some boogie-woogie piano comes in, and kids begin shouting, ‘Happy birthday to you!’’
    • ‘New to audiences might be the fact that the lindy hop, along with the Charleston, cakewalk, minstrel blues and boogie-woogie, was originally called jazz.’
    • ‘Gints sits down to rattle off some boogie-woogie.’
    • ‘And the latest entertainment for the regulars is the new honky-tonk / boogie-woogie piano nights with Karl Mullen on ‘as many Fridays as possible’.’
    • ‘I think it's best if I leave the old boogie-woogie to the Sugar Babes of the world, eh?’
    1. 1.1informal A dance to fast pop or rock music.
      • ‘I'm going to go out on the dance floor and have a boogie as Luke puts it.’
      • ‘The name Earth, Wind and Fire is almost synonymous with good vibes, sing-a-long hits and boogie dancing!’
      • ‘That is how my day at work went, from watching cartoons to watching an eight-year-old boogie to mobile phone tunes.’
      • ‘It is a fantastic album and whenever we do a concert and she is playing we all have a boogie and try and copy her dance routines.’
      • ‘I put my book down and scrolled through Navigation to see if ex-owner had the Macarena, as I felt like a bit of a boogie to music that no one else could hear.’
      • ‘Down by Mexico way is close by makes a nice combo if you fancy a salsa boogie upstairs.’
      • ‘And unlike the previous use of archaic folk tunes, Cajun stomps and swamp water boogies just don't have the same traditionalist staying power.’
      • ‘That night we find ourselves in the Zona Rosa area to hear more live music, have a boogie, and quaff more of the local firewater, Aguardiente.’
      • ‘Nitty Gritty at Oslo is open 9-2pm and is the place to be on a Wednesday if you want a drink and a boogie.’
      • ‘‘We've even had two police officers have a little boogie,’ says Cummins.’
      • ‘So I was in this club, having a bit of a boogie with Hot Canadian Dude (who isn't so hot anymore.’
      • ‘Jordanians feel that a bit of a boogie makes a meal go down easier, so live music and a dancefloor are a must at posher establishments.’
      • ‘The last time I went out on the town for a few drinks and a bit of a boogie was my birthday, back in October.’
      • ‘After a bit of a boogie to Grooverider with the dance nutters we left for home at about 3am.’
      • ‘Everyone out to have a good boogie on a Saturday night.’
      • ‘Remember drinking champers and having a boogie… the rest is a blank?’
      • ‘In the video, he gets chased around by a gangster for a while and then celebrates getting away by having a bit of a boogie on a stage.’
      • ‘It's a cool place, great for a Friday or Saturday night where your looking for some good drinks and a boogie till around 1: 30.’
      • ‘Well, I should probably go, I have some mad boogie dancing to catch up with.’
      • ‘I think if you want to have a good time with good company, then this is a good choice for a boogie.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]informal
  • 1Dance to fast pop or rock music.

    ‘ready to boogie down to the music of the house band’
    ‘he can boogie the night away’
    • ‘She said: ‘John runs mobile discos and we are always the first to boogie at parties.’’
    • ‘And he says, ‘Sometimes I wanted to go out and go and boogie and dance and cajole around and drink and smoke and have fun.’’
    • ‘As Kate got more alcohol into her system, the more she wanted to dance, and her and Cameron boogied on the dance floor.’
    • ‘I yelled to her, as she boogied with her friends on the living room rug, ‘I'm trying my dress on now!’’
    • ‘After the speech, Churchill Club members boogied away the night in single-minded pursuit of the groove.’
    • ‘Suddenly the groom's 80-year-old grandmother boogied to the dance floor and started a very lively line dance, which inspired half the room to hop to their feet.’
    • ‘I also like any movie where the characters can boogie, and Napoleon has dancing skills like I've never seen.’
    • ‘Committee members and volunteers were letting their hair down and they boogied and jived to the rhythmic beat of local band The Jury.’
    • ‘No-one objects when you boogie around your flat in a victory dance with a self-satisfied grin on your face.’
    • ‘‘I would like to show them how to boogie down,’ he shouts on the album's most cohesive song, ‘Paper Mills’.’
    • ‘During the curtain call, Mitchell boogied with Allen.’
    • ‘As the night wore on, the disco took over with young and old taking to the dance floor to boogie the night away.’
    • ‘If you shimmied to ‘Shake,’ you'll want to boogie down to ‘Bounce’ and ‘Girl Next Door.’’
    • ‘He pointed to the dance floor, where her group was still boogieing.’
    • ‘The traveler, on the other hand, is ready to boogie when he or she leaves, but is lonesome and tired on the way home.’
    • ‘People flocked out to hear the chosen band and to either sit and enjoy the music, or boogie the night away.’
    • ‘There is also the added bonus of great walks and a dance floor to boogie off those calories.’
    • ‘You have to fully regroup, march right back to front and boogie down like Ben and George.’
    • ‘So in a fond farewell, supporters turned out to test their artful talents in the old structure and to boogie down in the adjacent, air-conditioned party tent.’
    • ‘I thought it was just an album to boogie and eat Angel Delight to.’
    • ‘In some ways that's no bad thing - what else is dance music for if not to compel you to boogie?’
    dance, jig, leap, jump, skip, bounce
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    1. 1.1North American Move or leave somewhere fast.
      ‘I think we'd better boogie on out of here’
      • ‘Obviously we'll do the show and then right after that I have to boogie out to get to Texas because we start running the following day in Texas.’
      • ‘When the effervescent teenage waiter boogied past us on his way another table, M stopped him with the question that was clearly eating him.’
      hurtle, speed, career, shoot, streak, sweep, hare, fly, wing
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 20th century (originally US in the sense ‘party’): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

boogie

/ˈbo͝oɡē//ˈbʊɡi/