Definition of bonk in English:

bonk

verb

informal
  • 1with object Knock or hit (something) so as to cause a reverberating sound.

    ‘he bonked his head on the plane's low bulkhead’
    • ‘She steps closer to him, wishing she were two feet taller so she could just bonk her fist onto his obnoxiously rectangular head.’
    • ‘Pierre sat bold upright so quickly that he bonked his head on the floor of the overturned boat.’
    • ‘He changed position to free up one of his hands, and then he used the hand to bonk his enemy's head.’
    • ‘The pebble went sailing in the air before bonking him on the head.’
    • ‘During the fracas, the prince got bonked on his nose.’
    • ‘Don't lower yourself too quickly, or you'll bonk your head on the ground.’
    • ‘If I bonk you on the head and take your wallet, I may damage my soul but I do have your money.’
    • ‘Keagan nodded vigorously, accidentally bonking his forehead on the other's collarbone.’
    • ‘I usually don't listen until the situation foretold to me comes right up and bonks me on the nose.’
    • ‘She had only walked a few steps, when in the next second, she was flying in the air before her forehead bonked into the whiteboard painfully.’
    • ‘He did as told, and ended up bonking her on the head as she came up.’
    • ‘When Evan tries to mount his trusty steed, he bonks his superhero-sized chin on the saddle.’
    • ‘Maria jumped up so quickly, Dean's head bonked the ground hard as it fell from her lap.’
    • ‘That was built at about the time William the Conqueror was bonking Anglo-Saxons on the head.’
    • ‘There's simply no way a fire fell off a shelf and bonked an entire family in the head all at once.’
    • ‘Liz stood on her toes just to bonk him in the head.’
    • ‘On the first landing she attempts to stand, but one leg is an unhelpful position, and she bonks her head on the landing.’
    • ‘He stood, making sure that he wouldn't bonk his head on the ceiling.’
    • ‘‘Naw,’ he replied smiling fondly and bonking her on the head with his book, ‘My mom drove me today.’’
    • ‘The echoing bonks as they bounced down the concrete stairs was satisfyingly loud.’
  • 2British no object Have sexual intercourse with (someone)

    • ‘Unfortunately the script gods have decreed that our enigmatic hero has to have someone to bonk.’
    • ‘I'll show you mine if you show me yours… that is, I'll tell you which star I'd like to sleep with if you'll tell me who you'd like to bonk.’
    • ‘But that does not mean the bike sheds are crawling with nubile adolescents bonking like bunnies, or that those highly sexually experienced teenagers are typical.’
    • ‘The World Health Organization estimates that for every minute that passes, 83,000 couples round the world are bonking.’
    • ‘That was translated into ‘We bonked all night in the back of the Volvo.’’
    sexual intercourse, intercourse, lovemaking, making love, sex act, sexual relations, anal penetration, sexual penetration, vaginal penetration
    View synonyms
  • 3no object (of a cyclist or runner) reach a point of exhaustion that makes one unable to go further.

    ‘I bonked and couldn't pedal another stroke’
    • ‘He bonked over the next ascent, losing more than a minute, and the overall leader's mantle, to The Falcon.’
    • ‘The new routine never leaves him feeling bonked, but that's not best part.’
    • ‘Start by dawn and knock off by noon here - and hydrate or bonk.’
    • ‘A seven-mile loop on such terrain may take as long as two hours and always leaves one bruised, bloodied, and bonked.’
    • ‘I was brought up watching the painful grimaces of bonking cyclists attempting the inane.’
    • ‘But by the end of the three months, I could go up to 194 beats a minute and not bonk.’
    • ‘And when you bonk, they're still on the job, drawing on other energy systems to keep you going.’
    • ‘And if you bonk on though ascents like these, the efforts taking your toll on your legs may well lessen your downhilling abilities too.’
    • ‘More important, if you bonk on the run or have bike problems, it is much safer to have the wind at your back for the return trip.’
    • ‘A skinny man, who bonked early and often, crumples onto his back, eyes glazed over in a thousand-yard stare.’
    • ‘I usually bring a wee bit of honey with me on rides in case I bonk.’
    • ‘Every year, walkers are pulled off the course for dehydration and the effects of bonking.’
    • ‘Little do we know that at the top of the mountain he has bonked and is lying in the first-aid station, his body limp and shivering.’
    • ‘This year I threw time away in the Pyrenees when I bonked.’
    • ‘When I started the training, if I pushed myself above, say, 188 beats per minute, I would bonk.’
    • ‘Pace lines formed and dissolved as we each tried to find the right pace to make it 26 miles without bonking.’
    • ‘Then he starts to talk about freeriding, half pipes and barrel bonks and I'm completely lost.’
    • ‘My workouts were going more smoothly, and there was never an instance when I was in the middle of a run and all of a sudden felt the bonking effect.’
    • ‘Gerosa is now letting a gap open up at the back of the break… could he be bonking?’

noun

informal
  • 1An act of knocking or hitting something that causes a reverberating sound.

    ‘give it a bonk with a hammer’
    • ‘If an actor looks like a wimp, it's not going to be believable for him to slam down the other character, but a bonk to the eyes might work instead.’
    • ‘Everything we've learned in the past few years has given us a bonk on the head in terms of speaking directly to individual people.’
    • ‘The next thing Ayaki heard was a small bonk and an ‘ouch’ afterwards.’
    • ‘Revolutionary soldiers were either given a stick to bite or a bonk on the head so that they'd pass out.’
    • ‘He then spotted me, and he gave me a bonk on the forehead with the heel of his hand,’
    • ‘Do people really get amnesia from a bonk on the head?’
    • ‘Napoleon made his exit with the slam of a door and a shower of toy soldiers, one of which hit Talleyrand in the head with an audible bonk.’
    • ‘If I ever meet JJ in person, I’ll be sure to give him a good bonk on the nose.’
    • ‘However, every bonk on the head comes in crystal clear, and for this reviewer that's all that matters.’
    • ‘That director must've had a bonk on the head or no brain at all.’
    • ‘And yet he runs off stage in tears when he gets a little bonk from a Volvic bottle?’
  • 2British An act of sexual intercourse.

    • ‘A self-absorbed advertising type, gives up his Christmas airplane seat to a family man so he can stay behind for a bonk.’
    • ‘At least Sex in the City ended with a good bonk, which provided a raucous end to another lacklustre last show.’
    • ‘Last year I went back to Kynance with my beloved fiancée, and we thanked my guardian angel by having a delightful bonk on a cliff.’
    • ‘Unashamedly promiscuous, Slater's ambition dictates that a quick bonk can often be indispensable to an upwardly mobile career.’
  • 3the bonkA level of exhaustion that makes a cyclist or runner unable to go further.

    ‘we had the bonk when we were saddle sore’
    • ‘As the miles rack up the body starts to feel fatigued, the mind starts to not be quite as sharp, but I wasn't feeling the bonk and could have gone on for more.’
    • ‘Starting now, we're riding more, eating less and maxed out on energy bars - a combo that leaves us primed for some pretty bad bonks.’
    • ‘It also means that you need to keep the carbohydrates coming in throughout the race as the bonk will occur sooner than at sea level.’
    • ‘And sometimes, the bonks can be even more serious.’
    • ‘The bonk will only hit you once and then you will never let it happen again.’
    • ‘This additional carbohydrate fuel will prolong the time to the bonk.’

Origin

1930s: imitative.

Pronunciation

bonk

/bɑŋk//bäNGk/