Definition of bond in English:



  • 1A thing used to tie something or to fasten things together.

    ‘she brushed back a curl that had strayed from its bonds’
    figurative ‘chaos could result if the bonds of obedience and loyalty were broken’
    • ‘I am a link in a chain, a bond of connection between persons.’
    • ‘The country was always an unstable equilibrium, artificially held together by the iron bonds of an authoritarian and brutal regime.’
    • ‘His father pushed his sleeve up and tied on a rubber bond.’
    1. 1.1Physical restraints used to hold someone or something prisoner, especially ropes or chains.
      • ‘Her bonds were ropes on the hands, but her feet were chained together.’
      • ‘Ropes tightened against bonds with the swell of the sea.’
      • ‘Two soldiers marched forward and restrained her with alloy bonds as three others came forward to take her suit.’
      • ‘The wolf yelped and fell into his bonds, the chains tugging at his sore shoulders.’
      • ‘She pulled off the rope bonds until she was completely free.’
      • ‘When his sleepiness clears from his vision, he sees his naked body, floating but restrained by unseen bonds.’
      • ‘He felt like a rabbit caged by a hunter's trap, unable to break free of the iron bonds.’
      • ‘He flung himself against his bonds, and the chains scraped across the stone with a rattle.’
      • ‘Steel Fists cut the bonds holding the three prisoners.’
      • ‘Dergoul also described the use of what was known as the ‘short shackle’ - steel bonds pulled tight to keep the subject bunched up, while chained to the floor.’
      • ‘Glumly, Ichiro nodded as he struggled with his iron bonds even though he knew they had been done too skillfully to let him escape.’
      • ‘Then she took a tangle of rope, tied all their legs together, and wove a long cord through those bonds.’
      • ‘Rocking back and forth, he tightened every muscle in his body in an effort to break the bonds from the ropes.’
      chains, fetters, shackles, manacles, irons
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Adhesiveness; ability of two objects to stick to each other.
      ‘a total lack of effective bond between the concrete and the steel’
      • ‘After 69 years of building and leasing steel forms, we at EFCO know that concrete bonds or sticks to all forming surfaces to some degree.’
      • ‘The antistatic agent apparently weakens the bond between the stuck-on food and the pot or pan's surface.’
      • ‘There are many methods for testing the strength of adhesive bonds.’
      • ‘Even when the relative humidity of the concrete is less than ideal, these new epoxy products achieve good bond with the concrete.’
      • ‘If there are small areas where the sealer has lost bond with the concrete, scrub a solvent into the area to dissolve the sealer.’
      • ‘Beyond that, urethane is known to not bond well to concrete.’
      • ‘This packing gives the plaster a strong surface to key into and eliminates the problem of plaster from falling off of our wall for lack of mechanical bond.’
      • ‘One side of the dowel is set with a tube around it so that the concrete does not bond to that end of the dowel.’
    3. 1.3A force or feeling that unites people; a common emotion or interest.
      ‘there was a bond of understanding between them’
      • ‘A day may come when the courage of men fails, when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship.’
      • ‘The bond between the trade union movement and the Labour Party is a century old and was forged at the latter's birth.’
      • ‘The strange bond that we recognise as the human-animal bond has long been a subject of fascination to those who are not animal lovers.’
      • ‘Yes, you can generate sales - but equally, you can generate goodwill or an emotional bond.’
      • ‘People who trust one another share a bond of faith and understanding.’
      • ‘But community demands more than simply emotionally satisfying bonds between individuals.’
      • ‘So the question becomes, do we want these rising powers to be tied to us by bonds of mutual economic interest and shared prosperity?’
      • ‘The modern theme of friendship as with an emotional bond is brought into focus.’
      • ‘He added that he hoped the boy's death would help bind the community together in a shared bond of grief.’
      • ‘Holidays like Thanksgiving give the opportunity to get together and celebrate familial bonds that are like no other.’
      • ‘You understand friendship and very much respect its loyalty and bonds.’
      • ‘The three of us have a bond that results from our love of our sports and our friends.’
      • ‘Conversations and bursts of laughter were tossed on the wind bringing them together in a common bond.’
      • ‘I think there's a special bond of friendship that crosses party lines.’
      • ‘He said stressed-out lawyers and Inuit communities share a common bond.’
      • ‘He thought this gesture was a harbinger of the good old days when the Hindu and Muslim communities shared a special bond.’
      • ‘Yoga's most valuable boon may be its ability to promote the bond between mother and child, both during and after pregnancy.’
      • ‘If fans are pleased with the music they hear, they can provide feedback to works in progress, and form an emotional bond with the artist.’
      • ‘It may also play a role in disorders such as autism, where people have difficulties forming social bonds.’
      • ‘The unskilled workers' contacts were with people whose common bonds were social rather than industrial in nature.’
      friendship, relationship, fellowship, partnership, association, affiliation, alliance, coalition
      View synonyms
  • 2An agreement with legal force, in particular.

    • ‘It is logical because it is a legal bond, supposedly proof to the world that two people are in love, like a big advert.’
    • ‘At the time of the calls, the accused was on a common law peace bond and was to have no contact with the complainant.’
    • ‘In this case, the defendant, a dyer, had given a bond to the plaintiff not to exercise his trade in the same town for six months.’
    • ‘The kiss was considered a legal bond necessary to seal all contracts.’
    • ‘To guarantee this, the defendant must post a bond in the amount of the judgment.’
    • ‘If he doesn't live up to the conditions of the bond, then the jail sentence will be imposed.’
    • ‘They locate the Boy, but things are complicated when they learn a circus owner has an immigration bond that grants him legal custody of the kid.’
    • ‘His word was his bond, rarely was anyone disappointed.’
    • ‘It was basically a case of could we do business with these people and we liked the idea that their word was their bond.’
    • ‘However there is no allegation that any conduct of Mr. Goody in any way impacted on the obtaining of the peace bond in exchange for withdrawal of the charges.’
    • ‘In Korean American communities, the marriage bond has in some ways become stronger than filial piety.’
    • ‘Their bond is purely legal, familial, and time bound.’
    • ‘He would not then be able to say he was sentenced to six months gaol rather than got a bond.’
    • ‘A term of the peace bond was that Mr. R.L. not have any contact with C.T. except as supervised by the Society.’
    • ‘In came moral obligation bonds, in came lenient judges and cops, in came the most extravagant state government in the nation.’
    • ‘There, as in many states, a defendant has to post a bond in order to appeal a trial court judgement.’
    • ‘Arsonists are responsible for many bushfires in the state and many Australians are unhappy about the penalties, which include bonds or light prison sentences.’
    • ‘Marriage as a legal bond may become outdated, but I doubt it.’
    promise, pledge, vow, avowal, oath, word, word of honour, solemn word, guarantee, assurance
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Law A deed by which a person is committed to make payment to another.
      • ‘You can now buy bonds whose payments are tied to the occurrence of hurricanes or to the receipts of rock stars.’
      • ‘In November 1814 the federal government defaulted on its bond payments and was effectively bankrupt.’
      • ‘Besides the modest income banks will receive in coupon payments on the bonds, banks have no other source of cash flow.’
      • ‘He said the first payment that could be ‘problematic’ was a $2bn payment on its bonds due early next year.’
      • ‘The numbers do not reflect the fact that the company is claiming some $244,000 in principal payment on bonds posted on this project.’
      • ‘There are no options under a payment bond except to pay on default by the principal.’
      • ‘The central bank missed a $27 million interest payment on an international bond that was due in July.’
      • ‘The Government is disputing the payments under the bond transactions.’
      • ‘They have also been instructed to provide a bond that will guarantee payment of the full amount of the award if the appeal is unsuccessful.’
      • ‘The contract is to be found in the terms of the Trust Deed and of the bonds.’
      • ‘Upon repayment of the bond, the tribes will then make annual payments to the state until 2030, when the compact expires.’
      • ‘In the same period, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws requiring payment of bond or tax by persons bringing immigrants into the United States.’
      • ‘Wisconsin will sell its portion of the next 25 years of payments to investors as bonds.’
      • ‘But in that event, in payment in full of the liability under the bond, the bank will have received 100% of that liability.’
      • ‘The four criteria of a demand bond identified by Paget are all present in this case.’
      • ‘Chiquita has recently cut dividend payments on its bonds and is negotiating a restructuring plan with its bond holders.’
      • ‘But the spreads widened instead after Russia defaulted on its bond payments.’
      • ‘There is no restriction on the company's borrowing ability imposed by the bonds ' trust deed.’
      • ‘All vessels were released on payment of a bond to appear in the next sitting of Cork Circuit Court.’
      • ‘Can they afford the interest payments on its convertible bonds?’
    2. 2.2A certificate issued by a government or a public company promising to repay borrowed money at a fixed rate of interest at a specified time.
      • ‘Generally, corporate and government bonds are low risk but that is not always the case.’
      • ‘Debt repayments have been funded in part by new issues of government bonds but the money markets are concerned that this cannot continue indefinitely.’
      • ‘Typically, the security will be a bond, note, or other debt instrument.’
      • ‘Because the payments from bonds are fixed in advance, their value is quickly eroded by inflation.’
      • ‘Alternatively, the government may seek to borrow the money, by issuing Treasury bills and bonds to the public.’
      • ‘If you live in the state where the bond was issued, interest is free from state taxes, too.’
      • ‘In the second case bond prices are low and falling as they would be in inflation.’
      • ‘Expected return on a stock is analogous to the interest rate on a bond.’
      • ‘Your money could be tied up in low-yielding, long-term bonds when interest rates rise.’
      • ‘So the government should not in any situation press financial institutions to buy government bonds.’
      • ‘The issuing city, county, or state bets that the borrowed money can be invested to earn more than the interest rate that the bonds must pay.’
      • ‘It further contended that the government could save money by not issuing higher-yielding long bonds.’
      • ‘And the interest rates on Japanese government bonds - already very low - could also fall further.’
      • ‘It is apparent from correspondence that a number of investment products labelled bonds have performed in a manner which has surprised their owners.’
      • ‘If a government, company or financial institution wants to borrow some money, one of its options is to issue a bond.’
      • ‘Interest rates on government bonds of EMU member states have converged.’
      • ‘The government might issue new bonds to encourage a rise in interest rates in the bond market.’
      • ‘Artists and cartoonists worked diligently to produce dozens of posters to exhort people to buy bonds, go without meat, and enlist in the army.’
      • ‘If the money comes up short, the government tries to issue bonds and get people to buy them.’
      • ‘Governments and corporations issue bonds when they need to raise money.’
    3. 2.3An insurance policy held by a company, which protects against losses resulting from circumstances such as bankruptcy or misconduct by employees.
      • ‘Instead of doing that, they signed up to an insurance bond.’
      • ‘We have received quite a few e-mails over recent weeks about pensions, investments and insurance bonds.’
      • ‘Insurance company capital-protected guaranteed equity bonds are life insurance-based and pay an amount of the increase in a specified stock market index.’
      • ‘Sparkes says the insurance bond was something very close to the workers' hearts.’
      • ‘When loans and bonds are imperfect substitutes on the balance sheets of banks, a rise of the interest rate resulting in a liquidity squeeze may reduce the amount of bank loans.’
      • ‘‘Top-slicing’ is another method of mitigating tax liabilities on draw downs from offshore insurance bonds.’
      • ‘Each union must buy an insurance bond to protect members against fraud on the part of its staff, and must also meet stringent solvency regulations.’
      • ‘He says the insurance bond provides deserved protection for employees who put a lot into the company.’
      security, surety, guarantee, guaranty, pledge, assurance, insurance, indemnity, indemnification, pawn, backing
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4US A sum of money paid as bail.
      • ‘Sixty-four-year-old Spector will remain free on $1 million bond.’
      • ‘Very rarely do you get a bond or bail if the death penalty is being sought.’
      • ‘This caused the Plaintiffs to bring a motion to release the lien upon posting a bond.’
      • ‘As the police affidavit at their bond hearing made clear, the men seem to have been drifters, moving frequently from town to town.’
      • ‘In order to do so, Jasper had to post a lien bond in the amount of $40,031.38 as security.’
      • ‘Mr. Carroll was remanded on a cash bond of £500 to appear at the district court again in November, and was told to compensate the injured party for the damage done.’
      • ‘He pleaded not guilty to one count each of fraud, conspiracy and making false statements, before he was released on $10 million bond.’
      • ‘The defence was not only allowed to be put, but the sentencing judge released her on a bond.’
      • ‘And I suspect that it is money that has motivated Vollmann to include the bail bond chapter in The Royal Family.’
      • ‘I am 25 years old, and I underwrite bonds for a Bail Bonds company in Swartz Creek, Michigan.’
      • ‘Judge Martin remanded him on his own bond of £1,000 to appear at the April 12 sitting and to make himself available for random blood and urine samples.’
      • ‘He had to put up his truck against the bail bond, but there was just no way he was going to let them keep Blair in jail while he found the killer.’
      • ‘Judge Mary Martin remanded the defendant on his own bond of £1,000 to the May 3 sitting.’
      • ‘They were, however, released on bond, pending appeal.’
      • ‘A Columbia University graduate, Rodriguez fell into bail bonds when he was looking to augment his salary from his printing business.’
      • ‘To get the men out on bail, Immigration demanded bonds as high as $50,000 for some of the men.’
      • ‘There was always bail bonds and second chances.’
      • ‘He was released on a $100 cash bond, pending his April 14 arraignment.’
      surety, security, collateral, assurance, indemnity, indemnification
      View synonyms
  • 3A strong force of attraction holding atoms together in a molecule or crystal, resulting from the sharing or transfer of electrons.

    • ‘A polyatomic molecule with bonds which are polar is not necessarily polar itself.’
    • ‘In hydrolysis these two ions are forced into the bond between the large molecules.’
    • ‘To overcome the bonds that are present between the sodium and chloride ions and the bonds that are present between the water molecules, energy is needed.’
    • ‘The moment of inertia is related to the mass of the molecule's atoms and to the bond distance.’
    • ‘With the exception of hydrogen (blessed with a single electron), an atom cannot use all its electrons to form bonds.’
    • ‘When water is in the form of ice, the water molecules are moving very slowly and form strong bonds.’
    • ‘High temperatures are required, however, because the metal atoms grip the hydrogen with strong covalent bonds.’
    • ‘The electrons that are shared by the atoms to form the bond belong to one of these molecular orbitals.’
    • ‘A chemical reaction is simply breaking bonds between atoms and making new ones.’
    • ‘As a result, the orbitals become deformed, weakening the existing bond between molecules.’
    • ‘For example, electrons in a covalent bond are assigned to the more electronegative atom.’
    • ‘Less energy is required to melt a solid than is needed to break the bonds in the molecules.’
    • ‘Opposing this tendency is the covalent bond holding the HCl molecule together.’
    • ‘A covalent bond is a bond formed when two atoms share a pair of electrons.’
    • ‘Molecules have a definite structure, but the electron bonds that hold the atoms together are not rigid: they jiggle and wiggle and twist and stretch.’
    • ‘At the heart of these intermolecular interactions are weak bonds between a hydrogen atom on one water molecule and an oxygen atom on another.’
    • ‘Central to his image of science were the arrangements of atoms in molecules, and the bonds that held them together.’
    • ‘Pairs of electrons that are not shared in covalent bonds are lone pairs.’
    • ‘To complete an octet, each oxygen must share two electrons in a covalent bond.’
    • ‘New compounds are formed when the atoms within the molecule form a chemical bond.’
  • 4Building
    [with modifier] Any of the various patterns in which bricks are conventionally laid in order to ensure the strength of the resulting structure.

    • ‘Like conventional bricks, adobes are laid in a running bond - an overlapping pattern - then mortared in place with adobe mud.’
    • ‘The walls of the pool enclosure are running bond brick with a three-brick corbel at the top of the parapet wall.’
    • ‘Bricks shall be laid in running or stretcher bond with control joints as noted on drawings.’
    • ‘It is a welcome and thoughtful reprieve from endless stretcher bond, used in almost all other new buildings in the area.’
    • ‘The job requires a master mason to set the first course, grout bond beams, and install and tension the post-tension tendons.’
  • 5

    short for bond paper


  • 1Join or be joined securely to something else, typically by means of an adhesive substance, heat, or pressure.

    [with object] ‘press the material to bond the layers together’
    [no object] ‘this material will bond well to stainless steel rods’
    ‘a bonding agent’
    • ‘Patching cements look darker than the color of the cement because the polymer bonding agents in them make the concrete denser.’
    • ‘In conventional sand casting, the mold is formed around a pattern by ramming sand, mixed with the proper bonding agent, onto the pattern.’
    • ‘There is a thin strip of stainless steel bonded to the carbon fiber to give the 3-inch blade its edge.’
    • ‘When using adhesive to bond seams, don't insulate pipes while they are hot, and wait 36 hours before circulating hot water.’
    • ‘Tests produced adhesives that bonded to cloth, glass, leather, metal, paper, plastic, and other materials.’
    • ‘We bonded them with an adhesive that cannot ever be destroyed.’
    • ‘Fibro is perfectly safe if it's in good condition, with the asbestos fibres bonded firmly in the cement.’
    • ‘The parts are made by pouring a glue and powered metal particles into a mold, heating it up so that the glue bonds the powdered metal, and then melts away.’
    • ‘Today, joining aluminum is mainly fusion, resistance welding, and bonding.’
    • ‘The first metal bonding adhesive was developed by Nicholas de Bruyne in 1941.’
    • ‘The pressure forced the veneer to assume the shape of the mold and bonded the adhesive to it.’
    • ‘If you do not have latex bonding agent, simply dampen the area well by spraying water with a spray bottle.’
    • ‘A technique first used in the aerospace industry, weld bonding uses a structural adhesive film to reduce the number of spot welds.’
    • ‘Is the lower heat able to effectively bond the metals, or is welding the only option?’
    • ‘Silicone adhesive will bond the frame permanently to the mirror.’
    • ‘There are also bonding agents that increase the milk paint's ability to adhere to non-porous surfaces, as well as powdered milk paint removers.’
    • ‘Many such implants were made of a polyurethane foam outer layer bonded to the conventional filled silicone shell.’
    • ‘Granulflex is a hydrocolloid dressing with a thin polyurethane foam sheet bonded onto a semipermeable film.’
    • ‘As the sheets are rolled with high pressure and heat, they bond to each other except in the areas where the graphite sits.’
    • ‘The first step is usually the application of a bond coat - simply applying the undiluted polymer bonding agent liberally to the surface of the existing material.’
    join, connect, fasten, fix, affix, attach, secure, bind, stick, glue, gum, paste, cement, fuse, weld, solder
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object]Establish a relationship with someone based on shared feelings, interests, or experiences.
      ‘the failure to properly bond with their children’
      ‘the team has bonded together well’
      ‘the film has some great male bonding scenes’
      • ‘Members can instantly bond with one another while using a pseudonym and staying anonymous.’
      • ‘The groups would bond with people of similar race, similar class and similar status.’
      • ‘You expect to bond with your baby but do not really know what this means, it is hard to explain.’
      • ‘We all like people to treat us well, to acknowledge us, to talk to us, to bond with us.’
      • ‘In addition to health benefits, it is argued that suckling provides the kind of skin to skin contact that babies need to bond with mothers.’
      • ‘A club or sports team you're into is also a great place to bond with people who share your interests.’
      • ‘Here we see Harry - who once ran and hid from the relationship - actively create more opportunities to bond with Mary.’
      • ‘But victories over Turkey, Belgium, Sweden, Romania and Holland served as an adhesive, bonding the players as never before.’
      • ‘And of course there was always football, the perfect male bonding activity.’
      • ‘The purpose of these rituals is to enable young people to bond with others with whom they have undergone painful experiences.’
      • ‘They do not have the time to socialise and bond with family members, neighbours and friends.’
      • ‘You don't bond to others easily, but when you do it's long-lasting.’
      • ‘Quinn told her husband she was going away with William to have time to bond with him.’
      • ‘The horses also help campers bond with your camp.’
      • ‘The children are well loved in the institutions, making it easy for them to bond with their new families.’
      • ‘You were told all sorts of things - how to cure various ailments, how to listen and bond with horses and make them relax.’
      • ‘Paternity leave is defined as a period of leave from employment which enables fathers to bond with the mother and newborn child.’
      • ‘I mean I see it as a real social adhesive that bonds the community towards a common goal.’
      • ‘He suggested this could be designed as a programme for teachers to bond with the children in their schools.’
      • ‘Teams even use these holidays as good bonding exercises.’
      • ‘Time with parents is critical to a child's development and allows a baby to learn to trust and bond with his mother and/or father.’
      • ‘And while the rest of the world is doing away with cooking, Latinos see it as a key time to bond with families.’
  • 2Join or be joined by a chemical bond.

    • ‘The cation and anion bonded together are known as an ion pair.’
    • ‘Scientists came up with the name because the compounds have many carbon atoms bonded to hydroxide groups.’
    • ‘For example, companies bond an acetate or succinate molecule to Vitamin E to stabilize it.’
    • ‘Silicon and carbon are perfectly happy to bond on the molecular level.’
    • ‘Below this threshold, minerals occur as silicates, in that they are chemically bonded to silica.’
    • ‘Bonds are still the result of electron pairs residing in bonding molecular orbitals.’
    • ‘Because water molecules can bond only at certain angles, these lattices are full of empty space, and the solid takes up more room than the liquid.’
    • ‘While either of these will bond well with the silica and calcium in lime render, given the choice, their preference will be to bond with salt.’
    • ‘The walls are made of sugar molecules bonded by amino acids, Tenover explains, and vancomycin attacks the amino acid links.’
    • ‘Quantum dots can bond chemically to biological molecules, enabling them to trace specific proteins within cells.’
    • ‘The rocks and gravel are not chemically bonded to the cement.’
    • ‘According to this structure, every water molecule is bonded to the surface, rather than half of them.’
    • ‘The slow reaction will have the atoms bonding to form water very slowly.’
    • ‘The sodium is bonded to the hydroxide part of the compound with an ionic bond.’
    • ‘Amino acids bond together to make long chains and those long chains of amino acids are also called proteins.’
    • ‘Complex ions are ions that have a molecular structure consisting of a central atom bonded to other atoms by coordinate covalent bonds.’
    • ‘So when a jam mixture cools, the chainlike pectin molecules bond to form a network, holding the sugar solution and fruit pulp in what appears to be a solid mass.’
    • ‘This destruction of molecules allows the free oxygen atoms to bond with other oxygen molecules and form more ozone.’
    • ‘The pigments are chemically bonded to antibodies, which are then put into a solution of cells.’
    • ‘The result are bond angles of approximately 120° for the three atoms bonded to each of the alkene carbons.’
  • 3[with object] Lay (bricks) in an overlapping pattern so as to form a strong structure.

    ‘a bonding course’
    • ‘The user can change brick colors, bonding patterns, coursing, and mortar colors instantly.’
    • ‘The projecting bastions are drum-shaped, built of stone laced with horizontal bonding courses of red tile.’
    • ‘An ingenious pattern of brickwork bonding was adopted to ensure satisfactory composite action.’
  • 4Place (dutiable goods) in bond.

    • ‘I speak specifically of lenders, bonding companies, etc.’
    • ‘We also provide marketing, insurance and bonding, and we handle all the paperwork.’
    • ‘Among topics covered are how to organize a company, how to incorporate, insurance and bonding, and scheduling.’
    • ‘Both States had huge, irresponsible tax cuts which they paid for in part by bonding and borrowing.’
    • ‘Joint guarantee provided by several bonding companies are allowed.’


Middle English: variant of band.