Definition of bon mot in English:

bon mot

noun

  • A witty remark.

    • ‘This bon mot is immediately, and tellingly, followed by: ‘Follow the script.’’
    • ‘But it's another case of the author not being famous enough to carry such a bon mot, like Oscar Wilde and James Whistler.’
    • ‘The phrase ‘laughter in court’ often came from a carefully choreographed remark from a judge, solicitor or even accused after delivering a bon mot.’
    • ‘He is laconically hilarious, hot in a blonde way, he can pass off a piece of dialogue as the wittiest bon mot without breaking a sweat and he also writes.’
    • ‘Their motto isn't some fancy Latin or Norman French bon mot about steadfastness and glory - it's plain, single-syllable English: ‘One shot, one kill.’’
    • ‘She dreams in French and occasionally drops a bon mot into conversation, obviously relishing the feel of it in her mouth.’
    • ‘He was a master of the bon mot and the devastating epithet.’
    • ‘There's little I enjoy more than inventing new ways to sling words together to provide a bon mot, or a mot juste, if it pleases you better.’
    • ‘Thankfully, McCaughey doesn't reserve his bons mots solely for his songs.’
    • ‘How sophisticated to make a bon mot of the president's name.’
    • ‘But of course, the barriers are only aimed at consumers, hence the amusing bon mot, ‘Consumer Protection’.’
    • ‘But his way with a withering bon mot is nothing compared with the charm he displays when dealing with the fairer sex.’
    • ‘I usually think of something obtuse to say at this point, but I'm trying to say my bon mot for tomorrow, and the rest of the week.’
    • ‘Didn't I make you laugh, with my laconic, self-deprecatory wit and easy facility with the well-placed bon mot?’
    • ‘He was particularly good, for example, at rendering that slightly quizzical arch of the eyebrow and half-smile that precedes the bon mot.’
    • ‘It's 40 minutes of bons mots and good humour and, as one might expect, it's slightly old-fashioned.’
    • ‘They've painted little bons mots on the walls, which set the tone.’
    • ‘Every political side gets their shot at a bon mot, a quip, or a zinger.’
    • ‘Well, we have a right to bear arms so why not a right to bon mot?’
    • ‘His elegant, meticulously phrased performances of Haydn and Mozart became legendary, as did his caustic, witty bons mots.’
    witticism, quip, pun, pleasantry, jest, joke, sally
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century: French, literally ‘good word’.

Pronunciation

bon mot

/ˌbɑn ˈmoʊ//ˌbän ˈmō/