Definition of blue helmet in English:

blue helmet

noun

  • A member of a UN peacekeeping force.

    • ‘Some 15,000 blue helmets - in the largest UN peace-keeping operation in the world - flooded the country, and achieved a brittle peace.’
    • ‘Get them out, bring in the boys with the blue helmets and apparently everything will be fine.’
    • ‘The redeployment of a United Nations peacekeeping force with a broadened mandate in the country has failed to inspire confidence among residents, who feel the blue helmets have let them down in the past.’
    • ‘If we lose we will not leave behind blue helmets, but radicalism and chaos, a haven for terrorists, and a perception of weakness and lack of resolve and reckless blundering around the world.’
    • ‘The UN's blue helmets have done it before in equally tough situations, and they would certainly be treated with far less suspicion by these people than an occupying army and administration run by the world's sole superpower.’
    • ‘UN peacekeepers have suffered a series of humiliating setbacks, as earlier this year when 500 blue helmets were taken hostage by the rebel front.’
    • ‘When ordered to leave the three sitting ducks to their own devices, the Sergeant, a UN French blue helmet, enlists the media to his cause.’
    • ‘In spite of the presence of about 16,000 UN blue helmets and 3,600 civilian police, more than a hundred opposition party members were killed by these forces.’
    • ‘The blue helmets must never replace the national army.’
    • ‘Even if the administration were willing to grant the political concessions needed to internationalize the occupation, it's hard to see how sending in the blue helmets can undo all the mistakes made over the past year.’
    • ‘Would they be willing to cede control to the blue helmets?’
    • ‘I mentioned again and again that the United Nations has a lot to do, sending blue helmets to those parts of the world where we have conflicts, even wars, to come back to a safe negotiable future.’
    • ‘A meat shield of blue helmets along the ‘line of control’ seems a prudent step, since, as we all know, accidents happen.’
    • ‘His statement could not be interpreted as anything but a most refined presentation of the difference between the potential of the blue helmets and the ‘diplomatic top hats.’’
    • ‘I do not foresee U.N. blue helmets being deployed to that area.’
    • ‘So I hope that this sort of vote in the U.N. is not seen as some kind of a massive step forward, that the U.N. is now going to send the blue helmets in to do the work.’
    • ‘In that area since 1973, for example, U.N. blue helmets have helped keep the situation stable.’
    • ‘And so, we're not giving up any command of U.S. forces to blue helmets.’