Definition of blowout in English:



  • 1A sudden rupture or malfunction of a part or an apparatus due to pressure, in particular the bursting of an automobile tire.

    • ‘But if Treasury yields do begin a long climb back up, investors who have already suffered from the stock market blowout will take another hit.’
    • ‘Lying on the trailer-truck was the dead whale - underbelly exposed with a large elongated tear where the biological gaseous blowout took place.’
    • ‘This trade recession will be just as insidious in its effects as any market blowout.’
    • ‘Sinking oil and gas wells offshore is a risky venture because of the danger of blowouts and pipeline ruptures, as well as the daily increments of pollution.’
    • ‘It also said that if it is broken by some way other than natural blowout, there would be no replacement.’
    • ‘A toxic gas blowout at a drilling well in the municipality of Chongqing in south-west China on the night of December 23 has killed at least 233 people.’
    • ‘The 1979 internal blowout was associated with two surface eruptions that expelled large volumes of overpressured fluids for 10 days.’
    • ‘Technical glitches like the inability to find a blood vessel, or so-called ‘vein blowout,’ are infrequent and are relatively easy to deal with.’
    • ‘You're going to see a blowout of entire systems, of utility systems, electrical utility systems, and others, as a result of this.’
    • ‘The higher annealing point also means that the fibers will retain their strength better than standard E-glass at higher temperatures so the fibers will remain continuous and resist blowout in the exhaust.’
    • ‘If a blowout occurs during wireline operations, any pressure would be prevented from entering the riser, and would be contained by the control head.’
    puncture, flat tyre, burst tyre
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1North American informal An outburst of anger; an argument.
      ‘that exchange led to a big blowout five years ago’
      • ‘I had a big blowout with the federal government.’
      • ‘My best friend of over ten years and I had a bad blowout 2 years ago and I tell you, I miss her a lot.’
      • ‘If you can't talk about this without a big blowout, write her a letter explaining how you feel.’
      • ‘Physical, verbal, emotional abuse, infidelity, drunkenness, constant bickering, blowout arguments and shouting matches, financial trouble, stress so bad it put her in the hospital.’
      • ‘He serves as the amateur therapist of choice to his well-to-do clients, hearing all about their blowouts in the course of their blowouts, and I want to find out why.’
      • ‘The other conferences seem to have a lot of blowouts most of the time.’
      • ‘Slightly more mature, but enough immaturity to still bring on a good blowout fight whenever we feel like.’
      • ‘I too have had blowouts and the point somebody else made about losing control for a combination of reasons was true for me too.’
      • ‘The blowouts are mounting, and the bickering has begun.’
      • ‘He hasn't tried anything like that since their blowout years ago.’
      • ‘No one, apparently, could resist asking about the bad blood on the set of his latest film and the epic blowouts between the director and his star.’
      • ‘Letting frustrations fester is a real good way to ensure blowouts and fits of anger later on, so best to get it all out in the open.’
      • ‘She seriously considered that maybe she and Sam had had a blowout argument.’
      quarrel, disagreement, squabble, fight, difference of opinion, dispute, wrangle, clash, altercation, feud, dissension, war of words, contretemps, exchange of views
      fit of temper, fit of rage, fit of pique, fit, outburst, flare-up, blow-up, pet, paroxysm, frenzy, bad mood, mood, huff, scene
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2An uprush of oil or gas from a well.
      • ‘A similar blowout event also occurred in the onshore Seria Field in 1953.’
      • ‘SARS, fire, the country's election and the blowout of natural gas… all claimed many people's life.’
      • ‘According to official figures, there have been just two gas blowouts since 1992, and they killed a total of 17 people.’
      • ‘Such disruptions are both global and local: wars and embargoes, blowouts and refinery failures.’
      • ‘Sour gas well blowouts aren't completely uncommon.’
      • ‘Even after the blowout had been brought under control, the oil continued to seep out of the ocean floor, he says.’
      • ‘Successional patterns will be truncated or prevented in sites with frequent major disturbances, e.g. blowouts, water level changes, etc.’
    3. 1.3A melting of an electric fuse.
      • ‘According to the Corporation, the majority of accidents were due to tyre blowouts.’
      • ‘Had I attempted it immediately, there was grave danger of cutting the inner wall of one or both tyres and suffering a blowout.’
      • ‘This can lead to a panoply of bad results, from poor mileage to on-the-road blowouts.’
      • ‘This is dangerous as some of the tyres don't go down but are weakened, which could cause blowouts.’
      • ‘I managed to pull over to the hard shoulder expecting I'd had a blowout on one of my tyres but on inspection they looked fine.’
      • ‘I do remember quite vividly however watching a woman driving a car suffer a blowout.’
      • ‘Speed doesn't necessarily cause blowouts, as others who have posted opinions have said, poor maintenance of the tire can cause a blowout as can faulty valves or the tire being under pressure.’
      • ‘Potholing, creation of a steep-sided bowlshaped cavity, may be caused by loss of surfacing, basecourse erosion, advanced cracking under traffic or severe weather, or water-induced blowouts.’
      • ‘You never know when you are going to suffer a tyre blowout or when another driver is just going to be plain careless.’
      • ‘‘Even though a driver could check his tyres that morning he could later get a blowout,’ he added.’
      • ‘Tubeless radial tyres can cause blowouts because of their weak side walls’
      • ‘Most accidents are caused by blowouts or other mechanical failures and stupid drivers with no common sense.’
      • ‘Most roads are gravel, meaning accidents and tyre blowouts are not uncommon.’
      • ‘The accident occurred when the taxi suffered a left rear tyre blowout.’
      • ‘These blowouts were not from the tyres letting them down but simply from inner tubes exploding!’
      • ‘Tyre blowouts are common on a lot of trips and this is an area that weight can have a huge effect on.’
      • ‘Aviation experts have designed durable new radial tyres that burst into lighter, more flexible fragments if a blowout occurs.’
      • ‘They had suffered a tyre blowout on the way back from a safari park.’
      puncture, flat tyre, burst tyre
      View synonyms
  • 2North American informal An easy victory in a sporting contest or an election.

    ‘they had lost seven games—four by blowouts and three by slim margins’
    • ‘They've taken turns dominating each other, alternating sweeps and blowouts like a true slugfest in which one heavyweight's attack leaves him winded and vulnerable to the other's pulverizing blows.’
    • ‘The President won the election, but only by a couple of percentage points; it wasn't the blowout that those election night maps would seem to indicate.’
    • ‘By the way, both of those NBA games were blowouts.’
    • ‘Gus was tenacious defensively; even in a blowout victory he wouldn't let the other team have an inch of space.’
    • ‘Only the Vikings broke the barrier in a blowout victory over the Packers.’
    • ‘I would like to look at a different way to approach this issue that accepts that teams have blowouts and one-run wins and incorporates this into the method.’
    • ‘They were entertaining, even if the games were blowouts.’
    • ‘The team doesn't score enough runs to create blowouts.’
    • ‘That game was a blowout, but it wasn't a result of dropping nine players in pass coverage.’
    • ‘There are several ways to mitigate a blowout without losing control or playing soft.’
    • ‘Game 1 was a blowout, and the Bulls got a major psychological edge that helped them to their second straight title.’
    • ‘But for as much fun as the close ones are to watch, the blowouts might have been the most entertaining games Sunday.’
    • ‘Yes, he was saying the election could be a blowout, but he wasn't saying that was a good thing.’
    • ‘Often in a blowout, the referees will give the disadvantaged team some breaks.’
    • ‘The Patriots have won close games and blowouts.’
    • ‘A lot of last season's Monday night games were blowouts, but fantasy owners in close battles had reasons to watch.’
    • ‘Their playing time figures to come in blowouts or as replacements for players in foul trouble.’
    • ‘He was injured on two plays with marginal impact on the games in which they occurred, games destined to be blowouts regardless of his contributions.’
    • ‘While the first two games were both blowouts, the first playoff game in Memphis' history was highly competitive with the Spurs never leading by more than 6 points.’
    • ‘As a matter of fact, three of the four first round games yesterday were grim blowouts.’
  • 3informal A large or lavish meal or social gathering.

    • ‘The annual seasonal blowout is a chance to display and celebrate the accomplishments - and puppets - neighborhood groups have made over the past year.’
    • ‘He was still crowing over the success of his Dallas showroom expansion and the blowout coming-out party.’
    • ‘Mark's annual Derby Weekend blowout creates more buzz about the brand than anything else the company does, he says.’
    • ‘But Mom's been dreaming of a big blowout all her life, and you'd be a lout not to indulge her.’
    • ‘Despite the minor grumbles, we had a superb meal - especially with palates so jaded after the festive blowout.’
    • ‘Jokes spring up where you would most and least expect them-in a frat house bedroom during a blowout party, or at an octogenarian's funeral.’
    • ‘Visitors from more restrictive states began to make it their weekend blowout destination and a huge tourism business was built around it.’
    • ‘The Centre for Developing-Area Studies, an academic research centre at McGill, is turning 40 years old next week and is planning a big blowout.’
    • ‘It's more of a kind of brouhaha about springtime and summer's coming, so we're going to have a big blowout.’
    • ‘The ride will leave from town, ride miles of urban singletrack and some pave, and culminate with a blowout BBQ and podium ceremony.’
    • ‘We will be holding a big blowout for all our friends soon, complete with flour, pudding, and wet noodles.’
    • ‘It's a blowout affair that includes an unlimited number of roasted ears for every participant.’
    • ‘A haven of genteel entertainment might persuade local residents that there were pleasurable and respectable alternatives to a knock-down drunken blowout every weekend.’
    • ‘Today we turn our critical lens on the big blowout Washington party known as the presidential inauguration.’
    • ‘Anna was sixteen, the coolest age for a teen and she should have been having a blowout party with her friends, not sitting at home with her Mom and her Mom's friend.’
    • ‘But before we can weigh anchor, Flores erupts into Festa do Emigrante, a blowout party celebrating Azorean emigrants' annual return to the islands, beginning in July.’
    • ‘The gorgeous guy you've sorta been going out with is planning to go camping the weekend of your big blowout birthday bash.’
    • ‘My brother Ruben's wedding reception was a blowout party.’
    • ‘The biggest party I ever had was also a Halloween blowout, several years ago back in Kansas.’
    • ‘Who could resist an end-of-season barbecue blowout?’
    party, feast, banquet, celebration, binge
    View synonyms
  • 4North American An event at which goods are sold at heavily discounted prices.

    ‘the purpose of the blowout is to motivate new customers to visit’
    [as modifier] ‘the local store is having a big blowout sale—everything 65% off’
    • ‘Almost every store you pass, every corner you take, you'll find sales, discounts, blowouts, bargains, and of course shoppers cashing in on sweet holiday deals.’
    • ‘Twice a year, the school throws a blowout sale.’
    • ‘Retailers look for any occasion to host a blowout or a promotion that will make shoppers think they are saving money.’
    • ‘Dozens, maybe hundreds, of used console games are on sale in their October blowout sale.’
    • ‘If sales are strong, what will the blowout deals do to earnings?’
    • ‘There are lots of great scores to be had in the Outlet. Right now we're having a blowout.’
    • ‘The Prop Shop is sadly closing tomorrow so we're having a blowout sale with tees marked down to $10 and $12.’
    • ‘Woe to the promotion manager who doesn't ace the Christmas blowout.’
    • ‘Come on down to our Boxing Day blowout!’
    • ‘Their major buyers raid their blowout bins, put them in boxes and ship them to the States.’
  • 5North American An act or instance of blow-drying hair.

    ‘you can't do a blowout with super wet hair’
    • ‘So it was only a matter of time before shoulder pads, designer jeans, leg warmers, wide belts, layered peasant skirts and big, broad, blowout hair started to look good to us again.’
    • ‘In between blowouts, use a reactivating spray to reshape your style.’
    • ‘Want to achieve that salon style blowout at home?’
    • ‘Stylist Marvin Carrington decided to revamp her shoulder-length, naturally wavy hair with a sleek blowout, defined layers and blond highlights.’
  • 6A hollow eroded by the wind.

    • ‘North of this large major blowout is another, less pronounced blowout of unstabilized sand.’
    • ‘The crater resulting from the blowout was measured at 34m long, 15m wide and 6m deep.’
    • ‘As I walked into this blowout, I passed one species of plant life after another.’
    • ‘This one-side riddled basin can even persist beyond the blowout bifurcation, contrary to the previously reported riddled basins which exist only below the blowout transition.’
    • ‘Parabolic dunes are formed when the wind causes a blowout, that is, begins to gouge sand out from around a patch of vegetation that has weakened its grip.’