Main definitions of bloom in English

: bloom1bloom2

bloom1

noun

  • 1A flower, especially one cultivated for its beauty.

    ‘an exotic bloom’
    ‘the hydrangea has a wealth of bloom’
    • ‘Daylilies can grow slowly, especially if the plants carry exotic blooms.’
    • ‘Now that it has begun flowering, the blooms are dropping as soon as they open.’
    • ‘Remove from direct sun when flowering to prolong the life of the blooms.’
    • ‘Then in March the most vivid of blues, the gentian, waves its tiny blooms in my rock garden.’
    • ‘The white, pink, red and bi-colored blooms are showy against the dense evergreen shrubs.’
    • ‘The flowers got stuck in the doors - before I could re-open them he pulled out the flowers minus the blooms.’
    • ‘Many plants continue to produce new flowers if you remove the spent blooms before they set seeds.’
    • ‘‘Much of the drama and beauty of exotic blooms is in their unusual, long stems,’ she notes.’
    • ‘Perennials continue to grow and produce blooms for many years to come without reseeding or replanting.’
    • ‘Since yesterday more flowers had blooms, and now there were patches of white amongst the grass, and many more different flowers by the brook.’
    • ‘Remove seed pods, and remove spent blooms during the flowering season to encourage more color.’
    • ‘For reliable, early blooms in large quantity, many of these early flowering shrubs are as colorful as they are fragrant.’
    • ‘You'll need short handled pruners to cut off spent flower blooms, trim vines that have grown into walkways and shape shrubs.’
    • ‘Who knows, maybe the reason Cherie would fret over flowers is because the blooms didn't match her wallpaper.’
    • ‘In the western world these plants are well known as a source of garden flowers and florists' blooms.’
    • ‘Plain glass vases are still a florist's mainstay, and are perfect for those who prefer the focus to stay firmly on the beauty of the blooms.’
    • ‘Curved, narrow flower beds are best, because hummers can access the blooms from all sides of the plants.’
    • ‘Orchids are the second most popular flower and single blooms can be incorporated into a card to make a lovely presentation.’
    • ‘Pansies at Reliant will be pampered with soil and spray fertilizers to promote strong blooms.’
    • ‘Though summer may boast more blooms, the flower bulbs of spring hold a special place in our affections.’
    flower, blossom, floweret
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The state or period of flowering.
      ‘the apple trees were in bloom’
      • ‘Cows graze contentedly in green fields, pigs and hens fossick in the dirt and bees buzz through orchards in bloom.’
      • ‘Please understand that when I say it was the first time, I mean it was the first time I had ever smelled the flowering plant in full bloom.’
      • ‘With the right plants and a little luck, you may be able to see Lilacs in bloom in your yard for up to six weeks.’
      • ‘Since chrysanthemums are among the most widely sold perennials, they are easy to find in bloom almost anywhere this month.’
      • ‘The couple will also have the opportunity to meet with Chinese leaders who played a role in restoring bilateral ties and view flowering cherry trees in bloom in Beijing.’
      • ‘The variegation is a nice feature in a shady garden, especially when nothing is in bloom.’
      • ‘It's best to buy plants already in bloom to make sure you're getting the right variety.’
      • ‘Cherry blossoms were in full bloom while orchards started producing the fine small red fruits.’
      • ‘Annuals can be an antidote to areas of the garden that are boring as seedlings planted can be in bloom within a few days or weeks and will last between two months to a year depending on the type.’
      • ‘When the fruit tree is in bloom, they can perhaps subsist by picking the fruit off the tree; but suppose there is a blight, one year, on fruit trees?’
      • ‘This can be traumatic for the rosarian, especially if your plant is already in bloom or has lots of buds.’
      • ‘Recording which plants are in bloom when pesticide applications are made can be very valuable in future years.’
      • ‘Depending upon your climate and the species, you can have nerine in bloom from August to January.’
      • ‘The middle of the miniature is dominated by a large treetrunk in front of which a rosebush is in bloom.’
      • ‘The countryside was bleak in the winter and glorious in the summer - the gardens were beautiful with the rose bushes in bloom and mowed lawns.’
      • ‘They had been in bloom for a while now, but she loved her flowers all year round.’
      • ‘Visit a private or public garden to see lilies in bloom and help you decide which ones you like.’
      • ‘Trees were not in bloom in early to mid-February and were in full bloom by early to mid-March.’
      • ‘There were some flowering plants in bloom to be had but most of them were sad things, showing signs of weather damage.’
      • ‘To see these and other roses in bloom, visit municipal rose gardens or nurseries.’
    2. 1.2 The state or period of greatest beauty, freshness, or vigor.
      ‘a young girl, still in the bloom of youth’
      • ‘It is not entirely accurate to claim English players are generally held back instead of being given their chance in the full bloom of youthful innocence.’
      • ‘Travis openly wonders why, of all her sisters, she survived the seeming tragedy of being shut out of show business while still in the bloom of youth.’
      • ‘There are so many beautiful women in Thailand, and now since I am well past 40 I am no longer in the bloom of youth.’
      • ‘Gone are the chiseled cheekbones, dusted lightly with the first bloom of youth.’
      • ‘We are no longer in that bloom of youth where we considered ourselves to be 10 feet tall and bullet proof!’
      • ‘Some ran the course and others who are no longer in the bloom of youth cycled the miles just to prove a point.’
      • ‘Egg uses the same viewpoint to depict two girls in the bloom of youth, sitting in a railway carriage before a coastal landscape.’
      prime, perfection, acme, zenith, peak, height, heyday, flourishing, strength, vigour
      View synonyms
  • 2[in singular] A youthful or healthy glow in a person's complexion.

    ‘her face had lost its usual bloom’
    • ‘The fresh air put a bloom in her cheeks, and Ram thought he had never seen her so radiant.’
    • ‘She prided herself in a more particular manner on the lovely bloom and charming delicacy of her complexion, which had procured her the envy of one sex, and the admiration of the other.’
    • ‘The old face, calm and pleasant as ever; the complexion, quite juvenile in its bloom and clearness.’
    • ‘I found plenty of entertainment in listening to the larks singing far and near, and enjoying the sweet, warm sunshine; and watching her, my pet, and my delight, with her golden ringlets flying loose behind and her bright cheek, as soft and pure in its bloom as a wild rose, and her eyes radiant with cloudless pleasure.’
    • ‘Nothing could be more delicate than the blond complexion - its bloom set off by the powdered hair.’
    lustre, sheen, glow, radiance, freshness, perfection
    View synonyms
  • 3A delicate powdery surface deposit on certain fresh fruits, leaves, or stems.

    • ‘Paraffin wax is purposely added to a mixture to create a surface bloom which acts as a barrier to sun-checking and oxidation.’
    • ‘Similarly, recent research by colleagues at Cornell has shown that berries are highly susceptible from bloom until shortly after fruit set, but become much more resistant afterwards.’
    • ‘The bloom, however, begins to regenerate within a few days, but it does not attain its original prominence.’
    • ‘This waxy layer forms the grape's typically whitish surface, called the bloom.’
    • ‘To determine the level of bloom occurrence, the bloom was removed from the fruit surface by cellophane tape, and then affixed to a black acryl-board.’
    1. 3.1 A rapid growth of microscopic algae or cyanobacteria in water, often resulting in a colored scum on the surface.
      • ‘Plankton blooms usually follow coastal upwellings because of the abundant nutrients that come with it.’
      • ‘Future cruises through eddies in the region may determine the factors that stimulate the plankton blooms.’
      • ‘The nutrients trigger blooms of microscopic algae known as phytoplankton.’
      • ‘Upwelling of cold oceanic nutrient-rich waters in many shelves leads to extensive plankton blooms.’
      • ‘And it is well known that when algae proliferate, their toxic blooms can wipe out a region's aquaculture or close down its seafood restaurants.’
    2. 3.2 A grayish-white appearance on chocolate caused by cocoa butter rising to the surface.
      • ‘Bloom has nothing to do with the age of the chocolate.’
      • ‘Hartel's research team has come up with a theory to explain how visual fat bloom develops in well-tempered chocolates.’
      • ‘Fortunately, bloom does not affect the flavour or melting properties of chocolate and disappears once the chocolate is melted.’
      • ‘Chocolate bloom is the tell-tale sign that chocolate has not been stored correctly.’
      • ‘A new multi-mineral ingredient can improve fat bloom resistance in chocolate, while boosting the mineral content of the products, according to the manufacturer.’
  • 4A full bright sound, especially in a musical recording.

    ‘the remastering has lost some of the bloom of the strings’
    • ‘The brightest bloom in the bouquet of sound bites was ‘failure does not equate to a crime.’’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Produce flowers; be in flower.

    ‘a rose tree bloomed on a ruined wall’
    • ‘In the beautiful spring with flowers blooming, we set off for Yangzhou.’
    • ‘It will no longer be ‘spooky’ if it is a spacious area of grass, flat or hilly, with flowers blooming everywhere and trees regularly planted in rows to mark out the blocks of graves.’
    • ‘The view of the chambers was a village house that stood nearby, surrounded by, in spring, trees and flowers blooming in the orchard, which must have had a calming effect on the prisoners.’
    • ‘‘It was a lovely day, with flowers blooming, but it just happened to be very close to an airfield,’ says Anderson.’
    • ‘There are flowers on the logo and flowers blooming in their corporate ad.’
    • ‘No matter how much you may think the world revolves around you your deaths will not stop it spinning, will not stop flowers from blooming or the sun from rising in the morning.’
    • ‘Spring has come to Shanghai and we can again see flowers blooming and trees budding.’
    • ‘This legendary flower blooms once in 12 years and is due to enliven the mountainscapes, once again in the coming year.’
    • ‘Collect seeds from any flower that has a visible seed pod, which becomes obvious as the flowers stop blooming and go dormant in summer or fall.’
    • ‘The rise in temperature has certainly put nature in a tizzy and there are many reports, not just of birds hatching, but of trees, and shrubs budding and flowers blooming.’
    • ‘Nong Nooch Gardens recently announced that the flower was blooming only after 5 five years and opened the gardens for a special viewing by residents.’
    • ‘You can't force a flower to bloom by ripping the petals open.’
    • ‘These islands that were once dumping yards now wear a pleasant look with flowers blooming all over.’
    • ‘There is this little flower, which blooms when others die’
    • ‘Mom always used to do all the planting a week before her birthday so she could see the flowers blooming on her special day.’
    • ‘What if I kept postponing the outing until one day the boys didn't want to pick buttercups, or what if the flowers stopped blooming?’
    • ‘Clematis viticella ‘Etoile Violette’ is still blooming, the first flowers opened in July.’
    • ‘They came out with paintings that showed flowers blooming in spring, the water bodies after rain, the colourful world of tribal people, trees laden with mangoes and the mystique of starry nights.’
    • ‘Laura told us later that every week 15 different species of flowers start blooming on the prairie preserve.’
    • ‘Sakura is a flower which blooms in Kyoto during this part of the year and that is why I have titled my exhibition accordingly.’
    blossom, flower, be in blossom, be in flower, come into blossom, come into flower, open, open out, bud, sprout, burgeon, mature
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Come into or be in full beauty or health; flourish.
      ‘she bloomed as an actress under his tutelage’
      • ‘His soft pink lips bloomed into a sickening smile which drove everyone, well, the girls anyway, crazy.’
      • ‘As my health bloomed, I also saw many positive changes in my family's health as they gradually embraced this way of eating.’
      • ‘That range of rewarding possibilities can be further assisted in blooming to its full glory if comparisons with other transport modes can be made too.’
      • ‘Thames never was a top-flight prospect but bloomed late.’
      • ‘Around her, women and animals bloom, trees and flowers blossom, and her womb fills up with stones.’
      • ‘Night bloomed in the sky eating all signs of light away with hunger.’
      • ‘I have never loathed fish so much I thought as the strong disliking bloomed into full fledged hate.’
      • ‘She didn't really take notice yesterday, but this morning, in the light of the early sun, the whole city bloomed in its full glory.’
      • ‘As the credits played on, a little glow of joy sparked and bloomed into light.’
      • ‘Love can grow and bloom well if it is blessed with full and strong trust.’
      • ‘Workable budgets meant the service bloomed by the early '70s.’
      • ‘It is one of the reasons that experimental relativity took nearly a century to bloom and flourish.’
      • ‘Amid these life-retrospective ponderings blooms a story of young love and lust.’
      • ‘His pupils, usually slits in the dome light of the van, have bloomed into full circles.’
      • ‘I showed up on one of those rare spring afternoons in New York when everything is blooming, and the colors, sights, and sounds intoxicating.’
      • ‘Calandra was 14 and blooming with beauty that my mother alone was known to possess.’
      • ‘And a career which was all set to bloom goes deflated in a second.’
      • ‘His hallucinatory illustrations for the mystic had a direct impact on the psychedelic art that bloomed a few years later.’
      • ‘How to hold onto belief that colour and voice will bloom in this place?’
      • ‘The 60-minute second half is quicker in every way, and not only in the madcap chase through the audience, and the performances bloom and prosper.’
      flourish, thrive, be in good health, get on well, get ahead, prosper, succeed, be successful, progress, make progress, make headway, burgeon
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 (of fire, color, or light) become radiant and glowing.
      ‘color bloomed in her cheeks’
      • ‘Her cheeks bloomed in the light of the candles, and she nodded her head towards the girl behind her.’
      • ‘Fire bloomed and ate voraciously into the enemy ranks, sending screaming soldiers gushing fire like Gondoan candles fleeing blindly from the carnage, yet still they boiled from the passes.’
      • ‘A golden light bloomed from her hand and slowly the mortal wound healed.’
      • ‘Some full moon must have been blooming somewhere, because all of the nuts had been hatched out of the cages just to join me on my morning commute.’
      • ‘That simple action sent thrilling chills racing down Charlotte's back as a soft blush bloomed in her cheeks, making her shiver, whether from fright or excitement she did not know.’
      • ‘Amethyst flame bloomed, engulfing the ship in crackling light.’
      • ‘Aidis whispered a quick spell, and fire bloomed around his hands.’
      • ‘A glow of brilliant white light bloomed from the tips of his fingers.’
      • ‘Colour bloomed in Nicole's cheeks and her brow creased slightly in worry.’
      • ‘From the bosom of the light burst a jet of white fire, climbing, blooming in the night.’
      • ‘He threw something into the air, and light bloomed.’
      • ‘It would be some time before it bloomed and lit up the cliffs with its yellow-flowered prodigality again.’
      • ‘Light bloomed along the weal left by the ice-lash, then scattered, the long mark untouched.’
      • ‘Colour bloomed in Kitten's cheeks and hands, a healthy pink that suddenly made her look like a normal child.’
      • ‘A fire bloomed within and Amy dove in after the dear yearling.’
      • ‘Cresting the hill was a gaunt shadowy figure erect and gazing upwards with a longing countenance for the moon, which bloomed full in the sky, gazing almost as a wild creature would.’
      • ‘Still the sky was claimed by the night, but already a bit of sunlight was blooming past the eastern horizon.’
      • ‘Flowers grew in colorful disarray along the sides, and the late trees bloomed with light, colder looking colors.’
      • ‘I was sure my cheeks bloomed with colour almost immediately and I felt the blood rush up to my head, making my neck burn.’
      • ‘I stood there, agape, as a ball of light bloomed in Diana's chest and gradually enveloped her.’

Phrases

  • the bloom is off the rose

    • Something is no longer new, fresh, or exciting.

      • ‘Today, the bloom is off the rose of the ‘New Economy.’’
      • ‘Ultimately, now that the bloom is off the rose, his reddish-greenish affinities may not be as far from a robust version of the social-democratic perspective as he would comfortably acknowledge.’
      • ‘‘Those working in the market are convinced that hundreds of people have made big money buying and selling land. However, the bloom is off the rose.’’
      • ‘For his Vancouver project, the bloom is off the rose.’
      • ‘On page 36, for example, he may flatly assert that ‘a dismal new era of higher education has dawned’; but just twenty-four pages later, we learn that ‘the tide had turned’ and the ‘the bloom is off the rose.’’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse blóm flower, blossom blómi prosperity blómar flowers.

Pronunciation

bloom

/blo͞om/

Main definitions of bloom in English

: bloom1bloom2

bloom2

noun

  • 1A mass of iron, steel, or other metal hammered or rolled into a thick bar for further working.

    • ‘The bloom contained iron slag and particles of charcoal entrapped in the metal.’
    • ‘Once the iron had cooled and set, a file was drawn over the surface to gauge the hardness of the iron bloom to see if it had any steel in it - the file being of a known quality itself.’
    • ‘This also makes it possible, for example, when blooms are transversely cut, to reduce the travel segment of the cutting nozzle along the length of the bloom down to the width of the bloom in question.’
    • ‘The pillar is believed to have been made by forging together a series of disc-shaped iron blooms.’
    1. 1.1historical An unworked mass of puddled iron.
      • ‘The iron produced in this way was normally in the form of a very slaggy bloom, with a carbon content in the range 1-3 per cent.’
      • ‘For production, the ore was smelted, then the resultant iron bloom was hammered, stretched, and annealed to remove impurities.’
      • ‘To recreate the ancient way of making wrought iron, two Swedish blacksmiths have smelted a bloom of iron and begin to shape it into a bar.’
      • ‘The bloom, still at bright red heat, was then passed through rolling mills, becoming more elongated and thinner in section after each pass, and finished as puddled iron bar.’
      • ‘The bloom was repeatedly re-heated and hammered to remove most of the molten slag.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as noun blooming
  • Make (iron, steel, etc.) into a bloom.

    • ‘Each of the ingots was subjected to blooming into 155 mm square steel strips, and the resultant steel strips were subjected to wire rod milling.’
    • ‘A steel slab comprising the above constituents is produced by preparing the steel in a converter followed by either continuous casting or ingot making/blooming.’
    • ‘The howl of blooming steel washed over us.’
    • ‘In a blooming mill, a continuous-cast bloom is rolled into billets, reheated, and thereafter rolled and formed into various products in a steel bar mill or wire rod mill.’

Origin

Old English blōma, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

bloom

/blo͞om/