Main definitions of bloody in English

: bloody1bloody2

bloody1

adjective

  • 1Covered, smeared, or running with blood.

    ‘a bloody body’
    • ‘Dave tumbled off of the sofa, hand covering a bloody wound.’
    • ‘Many folks, including parents, may have cringed at the sight of the guy with a bloody nose on the cover of his latest album.’
    • ‘Psyke turned around, amusement covering his bloody face.’
    • ‘Elephants are typically covered in bloody wounds and rope burns when released from the crush after three to six days.’
    • ‘I stumbled forward to cover the bloody slashes on my back.’
    • ‘The youth took his bloody arm and covered his eyes.’
    • ‘It was then did I really look at him; his body was bloody, so covered with the rouge substance that I could not make head or tail of his face.’
    • ‘A bloody lip and blood covered shirt front were also Jerome's.’
    • ‘Scotty fell back into his fellow jocks' arms and covered his now bloody nose.’
    • ‘He was currently lying on the elevator floor in the fetal position, his hand covering his bloody mass of a nose.’
    • ‘It surely seemed like the form of a man but it was completely naked, bloody and covered with mud.’
    • ‘The bloody blankets that covered them were removed, like the books they never finished.’
    • ‘Her face was covered in small, bloody cuts; Julius had seen that many times; the cuts were from glass.’
    • ‘Sarah slowly stood up, her face covered in bloody scars.’
    • ‘Everyone's clothes were torn, only covered by bloody bandages, and they were incredibly dirty.’
    • ‘He was covered in bloody stab marks.’
    • ‘The bottoms of her feet were bloody and covered in blisters.’
    • ‘Finally he arrived at the bottom, bloody and covered in cuts, splayed out on the floor as though he were dead.’
    • ‘But there was no help in sight as the police threw my jacket around my head to cover the bloody face while pushing it down towards my knees.’
    • ‘She looked around, only a few men remained, bloody and covered in ash from the burning supply trucks and carriers.’
    bleeding, shedding blood, emitting blood, raw, gaping
    bloodstained, blood-soaked, blood-spattered, gory
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Composed of or resembling blood.
      ‘a bloody discharge’
      • ‘It is certainly true that the signs of a suspicious discharge are spontaneous, bloody discharge from a single duct often associated with a mass.’
      • ‘There is usually a history of pain, bloody discharge from the ears, and persistent hearing loss.’
      • ‘Alex couldn't help noticing the large, bloody smear that remained on the wall.’
      • ‘She had dust and dirt on her clothes, and a bloody smear on her cheek but she was alive.’
      • ‘He bent down, gathered a handful of straw from the floor and wiped off the bloody smear.’
      • ‘Dannah's chin was covered with a bloody foam, as was Russell's.’
      • ‘What about bloody nipple discharge during pregnancy?’
      • ‘This is true for patients with bloody discharges and for those with clear or serous discharges.’
      • ‘I froze in shock, saw the bloody fingerprints he left on the glass and wondered what had happened.’
      • ‘She was having dry coughing spells at first but then she began having a mucus discharge, which eventually was bloody.’
      • ‘There may be difficult breathing and a one sided bloody nasal discharge.’
      • ‘He had a swollen right orbit, a laceration over the right elbow, and bloody discharge from both nostrils.’
      • ‘Nipple discharges are classified as pathologic if they are spontaneous, bloody or associated with a mass.’
      • ‘At eight months George developed a bloody discharge and the eye problem returned, together with a clear mucous discharge from the right ear.’
      • ‘Proestrus is the time when a bloody discharge first appears in a female.’
      • ‘And instead of sore fingers and bloody smears, the only sign of the test area is a small round ‘target’ ring that disappears in a few minutes.’
      • ‘My right hand slipped off his tan pants, leaving a bloody smear.’
      • ‘This may cause bloody discharge from the nipple.’
      • ‘He found bloody smears where the wounded had crawled or been dragged away.’
      • ‘A nipple discharge that is dark or bloody or that happens without squeezing should be checked by the doctor.’
  • 2Involving or characterized by bloodshed or cruelty.

    ‘a bloody coup’
    ‘the bloody tyrannies of Europe’
    • ‘The 13 were sentenced to death for leading a bloody coup in 1983 in which the Bishop and four of his Cabinet members were killed.’
    • ‘In the eyes of many people the Soviet troops brought about the end of one bloody tyranny, a Nazi one, and the start of another, a Stalinist one.’
    • ‘Also in the months leading up to the event, he showed no indication that he was up to something as cataclysmic as the bloody coup.’
    • ‘From bloody coups to tribal and religious strife, that country hardly enjoys more than a few months without bloodletting and political convulsions.’
    • ‘And almost two decades later, he launched a failed and bloody coup to oust the dictator from power.’
    • ‘The government had for days promised an all-out offensive against the rebels who seized half the country after a bloody coup attempt on September 19.’
    • ‘More emotive tags: military coups, a bloody war of secession and ethnic cleansing.’
    • ‘The government is a thinly disguised dictatorship, which came to power through a bloody military coup in 1997.’
    • ‘Most of these groups squandered popular support in a bloody coup that ousted President Zviad Gamsakhurdia in early 1992.’
    • ‘It is an argument used by many governments to cover up the bloody nature of war, lest public opinion should turn against them.’
    • ‘Not since the bloody coup attempts against president Corazon Aquino in 1987 and 1989 have soldiers been so visible in the capital.’
    • ‘We are bound together in this bloody conflict where the body counts have to break double digits to really get our attention anymore.’
    • ‘A group of current and former Army officers launched a bloody but unsuccessful coup attempt on June 8, 2003.’
    • ‘Although it had once been a prosperous nation, it began to spiral downward after Samuel Doe's bloody coup in 1980.’
    • ‘Someone with an ounce of sense may even get elected, and then we can stave off the bloody coup for another four years.’
    • ‘Allende was overthrown in a bloody coup led by General Pinochet on 11 September 1973.’
    • ‘Chilly formality at the top covered bloody conflict in areas contested by the armies of the two parties, as the one sought to continue its expansion, the other to halt it.’
    • ‘That a film can be made about him speaks to how far this country has come in the 25 years since his bloody tyranny.’
    • ‘To topple the government of my country in a bloody coup.’
    • ‘Ever since its inception, the country has known little but bloody coups and brutal dictators.’
    involving bloodshed, gory, bloodthirsty
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Cover or stain with blood.

    ‘he ended the fight with his face bloodied and battered’
    figurative ‘she has been bloodied in her three years on the commission’
    • ‘She slapped him on his wounded cheek, bloodying her hand.’
    • ‘Scottish badminton reached a not unexpected low ebb as injury took effect and a primarily new and young team was bloodied.’
    • ‘If you've survived your opposite number bloodying your nose; gouging your eye; chewing your ear or just smacking you in the face, what some bloke with a laptop thinks about you is hardly going to raise your blood pressure.’
    • ‘He was famous for going into second base with his spikes high, bloodying middle infielders.’
    • ‘The violence bloodying our streets was the result.’
    • ‘Cure takes these ideas and adds the innocence of a child-like amnesiac behind them, an amnesiac who walks through a trail of death without ever bloodying his own hands.’
    • ‘Because he is the first critic I have met in my life whose philosophy, transcribed into those essays, bruises and bloodies one.’
    • ‘Between 300 and 400 soldiers, border police and civilian police got into running fistfights with the protesting settlers, bloodying some of them.’
    • ‘Well, I agree with the thesis of what Terry's saying, that we can't keep on bloodying each other up, going until March or April and not have a nominee when it is appearing that we have one strong frontrunner emerging.’
    • ‘After each story, he laughed about the good-natured fun they had shared bloodying each others faces.’
    • ‘Michael reared back and struck the radio dial with an anguished roar, bloodying his knuckles with the punch.’
    • ‘Tim doesn't think he'd be able to take the doctor's expression at that, not without bloodying his knuckles against the man's nose.’
    • ‘Men duke it out with each other, bloodying each other up, until one taps out.’
    • ‘He screamed down the alley, jumping up and pounding his fists into the wall behind him, bloodying his knuckles.’
    • ‘He hit the floor again, this time, bloodying his knuckles from the impact.’
    • ‘Then the miracle play jerks to life. A chop strikes home, straight to the skull, a head is bloodied.’
    • ‘Some punches were thrown, and at least four Sea Shepherd crew members were bloodied.’
    • ‘He gave Tim a quick jab to the face, bloodying his lip.’
    • ‘Why wouldn't they just rather let him win the judgeship (even after bloodying him up a little) on an up-or-down vote, and get him out of the public eye?’
    • ‘We've bloodied noses and bit off ears with the best of them, before even the US was a twinkle in someone's eye.’

Phrases

  • bloody (or bloodied) but unbowed

    • Proud of what one has achieved despite having suffered great difficulties or losses.

      • ‘Medical marijuana patients say they are bloodied but unbowed by yesterday's Supreme Court ruling that the federal government can continue to override state laws permitting medical cannabis use.’
      • ‘Tonight was the politician's opportunity to play the bloodied but unbowed ideological hero.’
      • ‘Six players in all, they still look regal and sing with their heads held high, as if bloodied but unbowed.’
      • ‘And preparations were being made for the New York Stock Exchange to return to trading, in a move charged with symbolism and aimed at showing that America is bloodied but unbowed in the wake of the terror attacks.’
      • ‘In the meantime, Thompson is bloodied but unbowed.’
      • ‘Closer to home, so is my favourite Swede - equally bloody but unbowed.’
      • ‘We're bloody but unbowed, and we will carry on the fight to meet the needs of our children.’
      • ‘Eventually after twenty four months we emerged - bloody but unbowed!’
      • ‘In the interests of balance, the heavily outnumbered camp are bloodied but unbowed.’
      • ‘The primary voice represented in her poems is that of the African American woman whose head is bloodied but unbowed, who is just as tough as the harsh city in which she lives.’
      • ‘So it seems natural to expect recognition for the two war leaders who emerged bloody but unbowed from these struggles.’
      • ‘With heads bloodied but unbowed, they have yielded to the superior force and numbers of the enemy… the province has fallen, but the spirit that made it stand, a beacon to all the liberty loving peoples of the world, cannot fail.’

Origin

Old English blōdig (see blood, -y).

Pronunciation

bloody

/ˈblədi//ˈblədē/

Main definitions of bloody in English

: bloody1bloody2

bloody2

adjective

British
informal
  • 1attributive Used to express anger, annoyance, or shock, or simply for emphasis.

    ‘took your bloody time’
    as exclamation ‘bloody Hell!—what was that?’
    as submodifier ‘it's bloody cold outside’
    • ‘When suddenly I realised that my car had been broken into… outside my bloody flat!’
    • ‘It's pretty dark, it's bloody cold, there's thick ice that hasn't melted despite being in the sun all day, and this bird decides to try to attract a mate.’
    • ‘And I'm bloody glad it annoyed all those people over there.’
    • ‘If it got anywhere near the bush it would be a bloody miracle.’
    • ‘That's a bloody miracle, cause he sure as hell couldn't before.’
    • ‘He hadn't seen her appear, it was as if she'd been there all along and he just hadn't noticed, which was simply bloody impossible.’
    • ‘If I had not been so bloody shocked at her response, I would have scolded her on the spot.’
    • ‘I managed £23,000 this week which is a bloody miracle.’
    • ‘It's bloody cold in this house: must set the heating so it comes on before 5pm, then I wouldn't be sitting here in my coat with freezing cold feet waiting for the room to heat up.’
    • ‘It'd be a bloody miracle if someone else was snapped and I wasn't.’
    • ‘Adam and I rendezvoused in the city so we could go and buy a heater, because it's been so bloody cold over the past few weeks in Sydney.’
    • ‘He's still leaving his bedroom window open when he goes out, despite me and Dave pointing out that it's bloody November, freezing cold and of course, what does Adam do when he and Hazel turn up?’
    • ‘Four days earlier I had caught a cold - bloody typical.’
    • ‘It was beautiful, even if it was bitingly cold and bloody slippery on the roads.’
    • ‘In comparison to Glasgow, its bloody cold here.’
    • ‘It was a bloody cold weekend, but the place was warm.’
    • ‘Swingeing cold, bloody wet and with bursts of intermittent mist.’
    • ‘A beautiful bright and sunny morning - but bloody cold.’
    • ‘It's too bloody cold outside, my bed is simply the most lovely and cosy place on Earth, and I don't really feel like going back to work tomorrow.’
    • ‘It was duly turned off and the more serious consequences averted… we still had to wait outside in the cold for the bloody fire brigade to arrive and officially declare the building safe though.’
    blasted, damn, damned, flaming, precious, confounded, pestilential, rotten, wretched
    View synonyms
  • 2dated Unpleasant or perverse.

    ‘don't be too bloody to poor Jack’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from bloody. The use of bloody to add emphasis to an expression is of uncertain origin, but is thought to have a connection with the ‘bloods’ (aristocratic rowdies) of the late 17th and early 18th centuries; hence the phrase bloody drunk (= as drunk as a blood) meant ‘very drunk indeed’. After the mid 18th century until quite recently bloody used as a swear word was regarded as unprintable, probably from the mistaken belief that it implied a blasphemous reference to the blood of Christ, or that the word was an alteration of ‘by Our Lady’; hence a widespread caution in using the term even in phrases, such as bloody battle, merely referring to bloodshed.

Pronunciation

bloody

/ˈblədi//ˈblədē/