Definition of blitz in US English:

blitz

noun

  • 1An intensive or sudden military attack.

    • ‘The excavation explored the 60th anniversary of the end of the second world war by uncovering a former Georgian terrace bombed in the blitz.’
    • ‘My great aunt was 40 when she was pulled out of a bombed air raid shelter during the Clydebank blitz in March 1941.’
    • ‘I talk myself out of imagining world war-styled bombing blitzes or trench warfare, and replaced them with images of land mines and machine guns.’
    • ‘The wall was inspired by a dusky wartime picture of London bolstered against the blitz in the Second World War.’
    • ‘A 600 name petition was drawn up by residents who said match nights had become reminiscent of the wartime blitz.’
    • ‘In December 1941 she had stood in the ruins of the Regimental Chapel after it was bombed during the blitz.’
    • ‘Barracks, garrisons, bivouacs and encampments thus far spared came under a blitz of laser-guided bombs first used in the Gulf War.’
    • ‘As they used to say in the blitz when shops had been bombed, it is now more open than usual.’
    • ‘My dad told me about the first air-raids he experienced in London during the blitz.’
    • ‘The London office had been bombed during the blitz.’
    • ‘The very fact that they had never endured a blitz or an invasion seemed to account for the obsessive fears of a nation always irrationally jumpy about its own security.’
    • ‘At the height of the blitz he sometimes had to cycle through air raids to attend members of Churchill's wartime cabinet in their underground bunker.’
    • ‘It was a dream compared to the air raids and blitz conditions she had had to put up with in London.’
    • ‘The constant bombing of the London in the blitz during World War Two are recounted at more than mere anniversaries of the event.’
    • ‘A second blitz will be initiated by the authority in September.’
    • ‘But he fought them in Europe and my grandmother sat under the bombs during the blitz of London.’
    • ‘The 1948 Olympics were held in London to honor the survival of a city badly battered by the blitz.’
    • ‘I was five years old when the war began and I remember the blitz, when we spent so much time in the air raid shelters.’
    bombardment, battery, bombing, onslaught, barrage, sally
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    1. 1.1 The German air raids on Britain in 1940–41.
  • 2informal A sudden, energetic, and concerted effort, typically on a specific task.

    ‘a major press blitz’
    • ‘Police have launched a major blitz on the town's teenage yobs.’
    • ‘The drive to build a successful retail division will be supported by a major marketing blitz designed to increase the profile of the business.’
    • ‘Police have launched a blitz on yobs who have been terrorising shoppers.’
    • ‘Thousands of illegal fireworks have been seized in a blitz on shops.’
    • ‘A blitz on parking has almost doubled the number of parking tickets handed out to drivers, netting the local Council more than £1.5m.’
    • ‘New measures to control firework abuse were promised as part of a blitz on anti-social behaviour.’
    • ‘The company planned to publicly announce the new lawn mower in a marketing blitz scheduled to occur six weeks later.’
    • ‘Last week I was having a bit of a blitz on residents permits and caught a black 3 series BMW with an out of date permit on the next door beat, two streets away.’
    • ‘Officers made 28 arrests over two weekends during a blitz on under-age drinking, drug taking and disorder plaguing parts of the city.’
    • ‘It went out with a blitz of billboard and press advertising last week to create a sense of nostalgia for a lost form of popular culture.’
    • ‘It is part of a major blitz by road tax enforcers which will start on Monday.’
    • ‘Police dogs, traffic officers and a specialist off-road unit are to be used in a huge blitz on moped thefts.’
    • ‘The disappointing return from the publicity blitz was doubly concerning as it coincided with a buoyant period for the mobile phone industry generally.’
    • ‘Too many people lost money in the past for the company to risk targeting the public in a marketing blitz.’
    • ‘Luckily, the developers of this game aren't relying on cross-selling and marketing blitzes.’
    • ‘A blitz on binge drinking this summer is underway.’
    • ‘The television adverts released last week are one element of this marketing blitz.’
    • ‘Forty-two cars were clamped in a blitz on non-taxed vehicles.’
    • ‘While eight officers investigated the vehicles, officials from the Benefits Agency conducted checks as part of a blitz on benefit fraud.’
    • ‘Had a major blitz on guests for next week's show.’
    all-out effort, effort, exertion, endeavour, onslaught, attack, push, thrust, set-to
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    1. 2.1American Football A charge of the passer by the defensive linebackers just after the ball is snapped.
      • ‘Mobility is supposed to be the key to success in the modern NFL, because of the blitzes thrown by opposing defenses.’
      • ‘He is frequently sent after the quarterback on middle blitzes yet has the quickness to cover receivers out of the backfield.’
      • ‘In a time when blitzes have made quarterbacking a more precarious endeavor than ever, teams that do not possess two accomplished forward passers are at risk.’
      • ‘He also is adept at getting to the quarterback on blitzes.’
      • ‘Will he be prepared for all the blitzes opposing defensive coordinators will throw at him?’
  • 3A form of chess in which moves must be made at very short intervals.

    • ‘Many blitz games are 5 minutes per player for the entire game.’
    • ‘One can well forgive an author for relying on internet blitz chess to research openings grandmasters hardly ever play.’
    • ‘Curiously, a blitz game I won gave me a lot of confidence and motivation, even though I won it purely by chance.’
    • ‘It is possible to organise some blitz tournaments (for fun) as well.’
    • ‘Back in the mid-Nineties, I played in a blitz tournament in Germany.’

verb

[with object]
  • 1Attack or damage (a place or building) in a blitz.

    ‘news came that Rotterdam had been blitzed’
    figurative ‘organizations blitzed Capitol Hill with mailgrams and postcards’
    • ‘Alarmed by a spiralling number of muggings and thefts - particularly of mobile phones - hundreds of police in London are to blitz the streets.’
    • ‘There's more going on than just some new bosses blitzing the city.’
    • ‘He said it would be preferable if the council sent out letters in advance before they decide to blitz a particular area.’
    • ‘It has seen a two thousand percent increase in speeding tickets and has plans to introduce 40 traffic-parking wardens to blitz the commercial areas.’
    • ‘Holyrood Church, fronting High Street was blitzed in the Second World War.’
    • ‘The council has hired a specialist company to blitz problem areas using hot water and a high-pressure lance.’
    • ‘Along with blacksmiths, farriers and wheelwrights, they watched as the land was blitzed.’
    • ‘Their marketing plan not only intends to blitz the globe with a massive advertising campaign, but will also saturate the domestic market right here at home.’
    • ‘Traffic wardens blitzed areas of the city this week, ticketing cars that hadn't been moved after four hours of parking.’
    • ‘Had Hitler not blitzed Rotterdam and then attacked France in the spring of 1940, the phony war might have remained just that.’
    • ‘A view of Victoria Street shows part of the cathedral and the Old Shambles area of the city blitzed by German bombers in the Second World War.’
    • ‘Church Square was one of the first areas blitzed.’
    • ‘‘No one knocked on our door to tell us or see if we had any objections, now there are lorries half the size of the street that have just blitzed the place,’ he said.’
    • ‘We should blitz the streets, targeting the problem areas when discos and takeaways close and schools.’
    • ‘We are blitzing the whole area, but we are encouraging people to contact us if they know of areas where it is a problem.’
    • ‘Coalition forces had taken the country with relative ease, blitzing the landscape with bombs and then columns of military might.’
    • ‘Hundreds of thousands of Christmas shoppers blitzed the high street yesterday on the busiest shopping day of the year.’
    • ‘Other new initiatives include setting up a new clean-up squad which will blitz areas within the intervention zones, and a project to help new residents coming to the borough settle in.’
    • ‘As city after city was blitzed, there was some dismay, a little looting but, overall, a remarkable stoicism and sense of community.’
    • ‘A team of 15 scouts are blitzing the city with flyers to tempt aspiring models into the shopping centres where entry photographs are being taken over the next two weeks.’
    bombard, attack, pound, blast
    View synonyms
  • 2American Football
    Attack (the passer) in a blitz.

    • ‘The 49ers blitzed and attacked, correctly anticipating the pass.’
    • ‘Last year the defense rarely blitzed because of the defensive ends' success.’
    • ‘This group might have shown progress, but the Broncos hardly blitzed.’
    • ‘He must show he can block blitzing linebackers.’
    • ‘The team has blitzed more in an effort to create more takeaways, but players need to do a better job of holding on to interceptions and falling on loose balls.’
    • ‘He can line up as the eighth man in the box to help shut down the run or blitz the quarterback.’
    • ‘For example, you can take an inside linebacker and assign him to blitz the quarterback while you get a safety to cover the area he vacates.’
    • ‘The trademarks are quickness to the ball and aggressive pursuit of the quarterback by linemen and blitzing line-backers and defensive backs.’
    • ‘He also reacted poorly to pass-rush pressure, which was generated mostly by a four- or five-man rush; the Patriots rarely blitzed.’
    • ‘They are utilizing his physical talents by playing him at the line, where he can play run support, blitz the quarterback and shadow underneath receivers.’

Phrases

  • Blitz spirit

    • Stoicism and determination in a difficult or dangerous situation, especially as displayed by a group of people.

      ‘he urged the British public to show their Blitz spirit in the face of the recession’
      • ‘She is perhaps held in deepest affection by the war generation, for whom she was the personification of the Blitz spirit.’
      • ‘But we cannot go on congratulating ourselves for our forbearance, or Blitz spirit or reason in the face of madness.’
      • ‘Were this to happen in London I'm not sure the ' Blitz spirit ' would hold out in quite the same way.’
      • ‘Of course Blair can't just conjure up a new Blitz spirit to suit his newfound focus on homeland security.’
      • ‘He said he had been astonished by the Blitz spirit of local people.’
      • ‘The past fortnight has had the subtle appeal of the Blitz spirit.’
      • ‘Possibly what's needed now is more of that Blitz spirit.’
      • ‘Time and again, flood victims have spoken of the revival of the "Blitz spirit" which is making their ordeal more bearable.’
      • ‘Some of the broadcasters tried to invoke the Blitz spirit, suggesting that that would get London through.’
      • ‘The prime minister has urged the British public to show their "Blitz spirit" in the face of the recession.’

Origin

1930s: abbreviation of blitzkrieg.

Pronunciation

blitz

/blits//blɪts/