Definition of black and white in English:

black and white

adjective

  • 1(of a photograph, movie, television program, or illustration) in black, white, shades of gray, and no other color.

    ‘old black-and-white movies’
    • ‘Does red eye show up in black-and-white photographs?’
    • ‘He would take us to the movies and we loved the way they dressed in 1940s black-and-white films.’
    • ‘The black-and-white film was the 1943 Academy Award winner for best picture.’
    • ‘The result is like a black-and-white photo negative, where the light parts are dark and the dark parts are light.’
    • ‘Or marry this one with season one, and you have all the black-and-white episodes.’
    • ‘The transfer for this black-and-white film is one of the most attractive I've seen for a film of this vintage.’
    • ‘There are two versions, one in full colour and in an equally-effective black and white format.’
    • ‘My class is taught to develop their own film and produce black-and-white photos.’
    • ‘Here, the black-and-white video consisted of two sets of male hands signing parts of the text.’
    • ‘This made mural-size black-and-white prints hard to find and expensive for collectors.’
    • ‘It was painted from an old black-and-white photograph somebody had lent her: she added the colours herself.’
    • ‘For black-and-white photography the issue of tone and mood and matching mats is extremely important.’
    • ‘Hanging proudly in the corner of a back street post office is a black-and-white photograph taken nearly 150 years ago.’
    • ‘On Saturday, I bought two prints of beautiful black-and-white photographs.’
    • ‘My expectations were tainted with scenes from the old black and white war flics.’
    • ‘I stared at the black-and-white photo showing a group of men, all with solemn faces.’
    • ‘The black-and-white illustrations are clearly reproduced.’
    • ‘Actors would briefly stop work on their latest film to accept the award and to have a small black-and-white photo taken.’
    • ‘Copies of old black-and-white pictures of the Dutch governor general are on display.’
    • ‘The first photograph was a black-and-white wedding photo, slightly yellowed with age.’
    monochrome, greyscale
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  • 2(of a situation or debate) involving clearly defined opposing principles or issues.

    ‘there is nothing black and white about these matters’
    • ‘She emerges from the meeting somewhat irritated that the world presented by the academic is so black and white.’
    • ‘The only problem, of course, is that neither situation is a black-and-white issue.’
    • ‘He says there are no black and white rules when it comes to terminating a drug offender from the program.’
    • ‘A black-and-white outcome is unlikely for an issue that contains more than its share of gray.’
    • ‘Or is he an unreliable witness on accounting issues that are far from black-and-white?’
    • ‘But look at the emissions figures and the black-and-white viewpoints start to grey.’
    • ‘A failure to divide the world into a stage for black-and-white moral conflict makes, he believes, for dull radio.’
    • ‘I am not naive, I do not believe life to be as black and white as stated above.’
    • ‘Nothing in life is black and white, and things aren't often as clear cut as we would like.’
    • ‘His characters were never black-and-white and each had its own complexity.’
    • ‘So I still do retain some belief in truth, but not so much in the black and white terms it was taught to me as a child.’
    • ‘According to Krustev, the idea of the unity and conflict of opposites leads to a black-and-white way of thinking.’
    • ‘That apple-pie world is black-and-white in both senses; it is comforting but limiting.’
    • ‘I am no longer vegetarian because I realised that this argument is not so black and white as I thought.’
    • ‘I had a perfectly unambiguous black-and-white statement saying it would be legal to operate if we had to.’
    • ‘But medical decisions are not black-and-white and cannot be reduced to a set of contractual contingencies.’
    • ‘Is potential failure assessment a black-and-white issue or does it depend on who is asking the questions and when?’
    • ‘Your question appears to raise an issue that is fairly black-and-white.’
    • ‘What he has to understand is that was back in his time when things were black and white.’
    • ‘It's also hard to forgive a moral code so juvenile and black-and-white it might have originated at a boy scout jamboree.’
    categorical, unequivocal, absolute, uncompromising, unconditional, unqualified, unambiguous, clear, clear-cut, positive, straightforward, definite, definitive
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noun

US
informal
  • A police car.

    • ‘After years of blues and browns on police cars, the traditional black-and-white is once again gaining popularity, and law enforcement agencies from coast to coast and across the Valley are making the switch.’
    • ‘I just got back from the class and noticed quite a few agencies have gone to black & whites.’
    • ‘Saw the Jefferson CSO (CO) Dodge Charger black and white with LEDS on a traffic stop today.’
    • ‘Nothing says "Police" like a black & white.’

Phrases

  • in black and white

    • 1In writing or in print, and regarded as more reliable, credible, or formal than by word of mouth.

      ‘getting her contract down in black and white’
      • ‘On the other hand, unlike the latter, its independence was laid down in black and white.’
      • ‘But the bill says in black and white that if you share so much as a single tune with your pals on the Internet-as millions do every day-you are a felon.’
      • ‘There are no gray areas in a properly prepared contract; everything is spelled out in black and white.’
      • ‘It's all there in black and white, in leaked European Union documents which are now published on the Internet.’
      • ‘Though this dependence was glossed over, it was there in black and white for anyone who chose to read the paper carefully enough.’
      • ‘Of course, the charts were printed right there in black and white, and they were always dominated by stuff like this.’
      • ‘It is there clearly in black and white - Nietzche states that a good social order demands hierarchy and slavery.’
      • ‘It is in black and white - the principal act is the Social Welfare Act.’
      • ‘After reading it in black and white, you'll find it nearly impossible, not to search the Net for some of these famous paintings.’
      • ‘There's no denying it if it's there in black and white.’
      in print, printed, written down, set down, on paper, committed to paper, recorded, on record, documented, clearly defined, explicitly defined, plainly defined
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    • 2In terms of clearly defined opposing principles or issues.

      ‘children think in black and white, good and bad’
      • ‘I think we are living in a world where people want to see things in black and white terms.’
      • ‘Their understanding is simplistic and they see rules in black and white terms.’
      • ‘You cannot see everything in this world in black and white terms.’
      • ‘Analysis of issues was unnecessary because the world was painted in black and white.’
      • ‘Once exquisitely sensitive to racial political correctness, she now sees the world in black and white.’
      • ‘Depressed people, Rita says, see things in black and white.’
      • ‘It's curious that those who talk about life being all about shades of grey suddenly see the world in black and white when it comes to corporate capitalism.’
      • ‘They crave books which confirm mythical notions of a magnificent past, in which villains and heroes are clearly drawn in black and white.’
      • ‘Doping in sport tends to be presented in black and white terms, but this case illustrated that it is not always so simple.’
      • ‘You tend to see the world in black and white, right or wrong.’
      in absolute terms, unequivocally, without shades of grey, categorically, uncompromisingly, unconditionally, unambiguously, clearly, positively, straightforwardly, definitely, definitively
      View synonyms

Pronunciation

black and white

/ˈˌblak ən ˈ(h)wīt/