Definition of birthright in English:

birthright

noun

  • 1A particular right of possession or privilege one has from birth, especially as an eldest child.

    • ‘Titled Esau studies, the group chose that name explicitly to reflect the younger brother's undercutting of the older brother's birthright.’
    • ‘Being the good brother he is, Jacob offers Esau some lentil soup - on one condition: Esau has to forgo his birthright and inheritance as eldest son.’
    • ‘Kerry County Council has received a warning from the top that the sale of holiday homes in the county is akin to selling family birthrights.’
    • ‘He reminds the king that he reversed the natural order of birthright when he gave his daughters the crown.’
    • ‘Mary Tudor acted swiftly to reclaim her birthright; her counter coup was decisive.’
    • ‘You know, you learn how to do justice by looking at examples of injustice - Cain killing his brother Abel, Jacob cheating his father and his brother about his birthright and then being cheated.’
    • ‘I'd say he worries too much about muddied bloodlines and sullied birthrights - purity is the most overrated virtue and one he really need not envy.’
    • ‘Notwithstanding the lack of paternal approval, Freeda George Foreman appears to have every chance of cashing in on her birthright because apart from Ali and Frazier, there are a host of other familiar names floating around female boxing.’
    • ‘For the one got possession of the birthright, and the other transferred the wealth of the Egyptians to the host of the Israelites.’
    • ‘Economically, it can enhance women's security, by giving them birthrights in property that cannot be willed away by men.’
    • ‘The Middle Kingdom was established on the principle that those who are of lower rank and wish to better themselves can do so by means of great deeds and accomplishments rather than by birthright.’
    • ‘Rather, in this character test, Esau has denigrated the birthright and has proven himself unworthy of its privileges and obligations.’
    • ‘But while his passage back to Asia sounds ‘natural’, considering his birthright, Pascal's career choice was not so clear cut.’
    • ‘For example, Talmudic law distinguishes individuals by both birthright and ritual purity.’
    • ‘The book is divided into sections and he deals with the various geographic regions, the monarchy, Buddhism, the life of the people and how it encompasses birthright, education, food, fun, death and doctors.’
    • ‘The birthright is the prerogative of the eldest son.’
    • ‘Example: the rise of the bourgeoisie over the aristocracy comes through a redefinition of material influence from connections and birthrights to pure wealth and educational knowhow.’
    • ‘Or will they instead, like so many lambs led willingly to the slaughter, allow themselves to be demutualised - like Esau in the Bible surrender their birthright for a mess of pottage?’
    • ‘They just want you to have what's rightfully yours: your birthright, your homeland, free from those whose ‘biological, genetic and evolutionary ancestry’ is inferior to yours.’
    • ‘Given his feats, birthright, and fortunes, he concludes that he does, in fact, deserve Portia.’
    patrimony, inheritance, heritage
    right, due, prerogative, privilege
    primogeniture
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A natural or moral right, possessed by everyone.
      ‘she saw a liberal education as the birthright of every child’
      • ‘It's your natural birthright, but they make you pay for it.’
      • ‘If you learn too many other things, then this natural birthright will become almost impossible to remember and relearn.’
      • ‘It is my birthright, as it is everyone else's in this town.’
      • ‘It returns the heart and mind to its birthright, naturally luminous and free.’
      • ‘It is by now, they feel, a simple birthright, as natural as the air they breathe.’
      • ‘Dissolving negative, harmful patterns leads toward the sense of ease, grace, lightness, freedom and good health that are every human being's natural birthright.’
      • ‘Winning national championships is not their birthright, and everyone's going to survive if Duke were to somehow have a few back-to-back 15-loss seasons.’
      • ‘Which will leave hundreds of thousands of football fans deprived of their natural birthright: when in doubt, blame the ref.’
      • ‘Once mollified, they are possessed once again of that calm which is their birthright, their black gaze deep.’
      • ‘I am a woman, possessing the softness and warmth that is my birthright, and I love what I am.’
      • ‘Every human being has a natural birthright of having access to natural resources such as water.’
      • ‘This ancestral knowledge comes naturally to us; it is our birthright.’
      • ‘We also have a birthright: rhetoric's role in civic education.’
      • ‘The birthright of Christian education was not stolen by skeptics and rationalists.’
      • ‘Overall, TAU students project a sense of a birthright to education that is rare at UMB.’
      • ‘This was our birthright as intellectuals, but to possess it we needed to withstand the terror, loneliness, and isolation inherent in intellectual life.’
      • ‘A generally accepted tenet of the American dream is that a high-quality education is a birthright.’
      • ‘A despiser of Western religions, he was an ardent polygamist, convinced that promiscuity was man's natural birthright.’
      • ‘In other parts of the world, female infants and children are still selectively denied their birthrights, food, and education.’
      • ‘We will put a stop to Labour's politics of envy and give to tenants in London what is every other tenant's birthright and reinstate the right to buy.’

Pronunciation:

birthright

/ˈbərTHˌrīt/