Definition of biopsychology in US English:

biopsychology

noun

  • The branch of psychology concerned with its biological and physiological aspects.

    • ‘Their expertise span from biopsychology to clinical psychology, from cognitive psychology to professional ethics and standards, and from perception and psychophysics to industrial psychology.’
    • ‘He utilized psychophysiological methods to address a variety of theoretical issues that bridge the gap between social psychology and biopsychology.’
    • ‘This year's featured core areas include personality, cognition and perception, health and behavioral medicine, animal and human biopsychology, and applied psychology.’
    • ‘‘The field of physiological or biopsychology typically looks at how biology causes changes in behavior,’ she adds.’
    • ‘He called it biopsychology and explained that by doing specific postures (while following a yoga diet and meditating) a person could help bring into balance agitated states of mind such as anger, shyness, fear, jealousy etc.’
    • ‘That is precisely what I did; I applied to several places all of which were searching for behavioral neuroscience, biopsychology, psychobiology types; only one was searching for an evolutionary psychologist.’
    • ‘A truly modern, interdisciplinary theory of decision making could explain these findings with a traditional cost/benefit model that incorporates existing knowledge in biopsychology.’
    • ‘The field of biopsychology did emerge and the widely held view that psychological functioning was too complex to have its roots in chemistry and physiology of the brain was discredited.’

Pronunciation

biopsychology

/ˌbīōsīˈkäləjē/