Definition of bionic in US English:

bionic

adjective

  • 1Having artificial body parts, especially electromechanical ones.

    • ‘He said he has spent hundreds of pounds on equipment, including a bionic ear that amplifies sound by 36 times, a two-way radio with a radius of three miles, a night vision monocular and a searchlight.’
    • ‘Understanding what, exactly, the cochlear implant does may help children appreciate their new bionic ear and the cool technology that's behind it that allows them to hear better.’
    • ‘Back in the 1970s, Steve Austin amazed the TV-watching world with his fictional bionic replacement body parts.’
    • ‘And clearly what everyone knows about it, the more dramatic situations where hearing aids don't work, and then you've got cochlear implants, the bionic ear that people in Australia have led the world in.’
    • ‘So as a technical writer, I may have to write the instructions for how to set a timer on a VCR, or how to replace a battery in a bionic ear, or how to configure the hardware in a telecommunications network.’
    • ‘‘No,’ said Rilar Cray, for the third time, and felt the autonomic systems in her bionic left side kick in and administer a dose of calming endorphins.’
    • ‘We here so many stories about bionic eyes, AIDS vaccines, artificial skin, ‘cures’ for dementia etc, that never seem to get past the headline and research stage.’
    • ‘In other words, if you are shifted over toward the bionic side of the saddle, whether that leg is shorter or not, it would pull the muscles and tendons on the other leg more.’
    • ‘The Elek were a race that were not born, but grown in clone vats with bionic limbs and nanofiber organs as part of their physiology.’
    • ‘After all, people thought the very idea of a bionic man was crazy until we actually made one.’
    • ‘Correspondence chess games, while often brilliant, have seemed kind of like the equivalent of the bionic man - strong play sure, but is it really human?’
    • ‘It can even become the basis of artificial sight - bionic eyes.’
    • ‘I suppose if you stimulate any nerve cell in your body the procedure is fairly generic, so the extension from a bionic ear to a bionic eye isn't a technological leap in terms of the delivery of electrical stimulation.’
    • ‘Gadget was bionic and had various contraptions built into his body, but his personality and some of his catchphrases were distinctly reminiscent of Maxwell Smart.’
    • ‘Scientists with the ability to develop bionic dogs and digital noses are beginning experiments to create K9-the world's first robot sniffer dog.’
    • ‘The possibility of a species of bionic men and women has been elaborately imagined in science fiction portrayals of alien races such as ‘The Borg’ in the Paramount television series Star Trek The Next Generation.’
    • ‘He had been wounded before, many times, but this one forced him to use an artificial heart, and a bionic limb replacement for his right arm.’
    • ‘Summarizing the plot, a gleeful morass of B-movie humour involving an evil sibling, a bionic bigfoot and radioactive pearls, is not only difficult, but also useless.’
    • ‘The Bionic Man was an entertaining piece of fictional TV, but Steve Austin's bionic eye is now a reality.’
    • ‘‘They've been compared by some people to bionic arms,’ James wrote.’
    1. 1.1informal Having ordinary human powers increased by the aid of bionic devices (real or fictional)
      ‘working out in gymnasiums to become bionic men’
      • ‘In general, I'm all for athletes playing as long as they want to or can - bionic Rickey Henderson being the poster child - without concern for their legacy.’
      • ‘Even myself, the bionic plane jumping man, was not immune, and after a week am still coughing so badly that the domestic African Grey parrot now sounds definitely consumptive.’
      • ‘Unless television has steered me wrong all these years, surely being bionic means you become some kind of super human.’
      • ‘Future enhancements will include fuel cells as well as bionic strength - well, not really, as ASIMO can only lift about two pounds.’
      • ‘Lara muttered something about bionic boy hearing.’
      • ‘Similarly, Joseph Williams has shown how teachers' harsh, bionic eyes for error in student writing are made all too human when they don the lenses of nonteachers and read other kinds of writing.’
      • ‘I like to think that these detectors are like bionic ears for the human race to allow us to listen to the sounds of the universe for the first time.’
      • ‘We forget that these men and women are flesh and blood, not bionic men and women who can go to the nearest NAPA auto parts store and get new U-joints.’
      • ‘‘He's bionic, literally,’ says a Hawks assistant coach’
      • ‘Probable enough, as long as you subscribe to the notion that the duration and ferocity of Ankersmit's reed assault is the product of some sort of bionic lung machine capable of infinite gale-force winds.’
      • ‘I don't know how much longer I can carry on the rivalry without Georgetown making the dance - I'm running out of ways to mock the bionic Boeheim and his perennially successful teams.’
      • ‘So when we hear news then, that researchers are spending a considerable amount of time and energy and have come up with what is an artificial hippocampus are we talking about the prospects of a memory chip here, or bionic memory?’
      • ‘But if my parents have people over during break or summer, well, they call to me for 15 minutes until my bionic hearing finally decides to listen, and I turn off my loud rock music.’
      • ‘I should've known your bionic ears would pick it up.’
    2. 1.2 Relating to bionics.
      • ‘Other bionic devices on the horizon include implantable monitors that will track pressure in the brains of spina bifida patients who require fluid-draining shunts.’
      • ‘The new design answers major questions about what's feasible for bionic devices.’
      • ‘It develops bionic devices for people with neurological disorders.’
      • ‘The OG Vets had drained the power of the bionic parts.’
      • ‘It looked much like a human with bionic implants.’
      • ‘As well as restoring the power of grasping, the bionic glove would function as a therapeutic aid by moving the hand in regular exercises to prevent the tissue seizing up and permanently damaging joints.’

Origin

1960s: from bio- ‘human’, on the pattern of electronic.

Pronunciation

bionic

/bīˈänik//baɪˈɑnɪk/