Definition of binomial in English:

binomial

noun

  • 1Mathematics
    An algebraic expression of the sum or the difference of two terms.

    • ‘It says ‘factor as the product of linear binomials or write prime.’’
    • ‘For the dispersal of the binomial in the polynomial gives rise to a number of minor difficulties.’
    • ‘Foil, First-Outer-Inner-Last, refers to the distributive property for multiplying two binomials.’
    • ‘Al-Khwarizmi's concept of algebra can now be grasped with greater precision: it concerns the theory of linear and quadratic equations with a single unknown, and the elementary arithmetic of relative binomials and trinomials.…’
    • ‘There are many other forgeries in the paper to do with primes, Catalan numbers, binomial and trinomial numbers, mixing some genuine examples with the forgeries.’
  • 2A two-part name, especially the Latin name of a species of living organism (consisting of the genus followed by the specific epithet)

    • ‘Throughout the text we use traditional binomials as ruled by the ICZN, but include their original generic assignments in parentheses [i.e., Chelonia (orig.)].’
    • ‘Overlooked was Buckley's proposal of the binomial T. texanum, now considered a variety of T. pusillum.’
    • ‘Genes and proteins are named with the two first letters representing the initial letters of the Latin binomial followed by the original symbol.’
    • ‘Etymology.-From Cretaceous, the geological epoch of the genus; and the standard suffix for thrips binomials.’
    • ‘It has various Latin binomials including Acanthopanax gracilistylus, A. sessiloflorus, A. senticosus and according to Chang and But, the name given by Harms, Eleutherococcus senticosus.’
    • ‘Etymology.-For the geological epoch in which the genus occurs; and a standard suffix used in thrips binomials.’
    • ‘Throughout, all binomials have had the generic name reduced to its initial.’
    • ‘In an attempt to gain acceptance for the use of duplicate binomials, MacMillan proposed the tautonym A. apios.’
    • ‘Each monograph begins with a brief physical description of the plant providing the Latin binomial and the plant part used.’
    • ‘Incidentally, these binomials, as they are called are the genus and species names.’
    • ‘As Feduccia has pointed out, there is not a great deal of utility in giving every scrap of lithified bone a Latin binomial.’
    • ‘The original title of Proteus (now changed because Miramax is doing a submarine story with the same title) involves the naming of the Protea flower in 1735 when it was given its correct Latin binomial.’
    • ‘Then came the great reform of Carolus Linnaeus and his system of Latin binomials, identifying each organism by genus and species.’
    • ‘Thus, regardless of how one approaches Linnean binomials, there are two ways in which applying stratigraphic ranges to genera is problematic when possible paraphyly is a consequence of the analysis.’
    • ‘The scientific name for horehound is Marrubium vulgare, and like all such binomials, tells you something about the plant when the name is translated.’’
    • ‘The use of Linnaean binomials (even in paleontology) conveys more information about the likely relationships of taxa than can the PhyloCode.’
    • ‘The authors were inconsistent in providing the binomial following common names of organisms, including crops, within the text.’
    • ‘There is still much discussion over the issue of species and binomials in the phylogenetic system, and at present, the draft PhyloCode only addresses supraspecific taxa.’
  • 3Grammar
    A noun phrase with two heads joined by a conjunction, in which the order is relatively fixed (as in knife and fork)

    • ‘The analysis of formulaic German binomial expressions of the form N und N reveals the following characteristics.’
    • ‘Why stop at calling "salt and pepper" a compound, rather than a binomial?’
    • ‘The language has innumerable binomial compounds and collocations, as well as many "sesquisyllabic" or polysyllabic words of Khmer or Indic origin that contain unstressed vowels, so that the phonological texture of the language is very different from that of uncompromisingly monosyllabic languages like Chinese and Vietnamese.’
    • ‘In this paper, I will take a close look at binomial expressions, namely of the form noun+and+noun, verb+and+verb, and adjective+and+adjective.’
    • ‘Based on an analysis of 692 binomial tokens from online corpora, we show that a number of semantic, metrical, and frequency constraints contribute significantly to ordering preferences, overshadowing the phonological factors that have traditionally been considered important.’

adjective

  • 1Mathematics
    Consisting of two terms.

    • ‘There is an infinite number of solutions for the binomial equation (in real numbers).’
    • ‘Cotes discovered an important theorem on the nth roots of unity, anticipated the method of least squares and discovered a method of integrating rational fractions with binomial denominators.’
    • ‘To do this, you will need to compute 4 distinct Binomial terms. Find the value of each, then add them.’
    • ‘These expansions of the binomial equation describe all the possible outcomes from the experiment above.’
    • ‘By pulling these observations together with some mathematical syntax, a theorem is formed relating to the expansion of binomial terms.’
    1. 1.1Relating to a binomial or to the binomial theorem.
      • ‘First, we briefly review the related literature, then present a simple binomial model under a stochastic volatility and jump economic world.’
      • ‘The choice of x genes and y taxa approaches true randomness as the binomial coefficient increases relative to replicate number.’
      • ‘Da Cunha develops a criterion for the convergence of a series which he uses to define the exponential function in a rather modern way, and from these develops the binomial series.’
      • ‘In the manuscript al-Tusi determined the coefficients of the expansion of a binomial to any power giving the binomial formula and the Pascal triangle relations between binomial coefficients.’
      • ‘For example in Li's method of writing the sum of the pth powers of the first n natural numbers as sums of binomial coefficients is given.’
      • ‘In general there are few known identities involving sums of products of several binomial coefficients.’
      • ‘The response variable was modelled as binomial (ratio between the abundance of each pollinator group and the overall pollinator abundance in each region).’
      • ‘It investigates the use of some functional equations in order to calculate the differentials of logarithmic and trigonometrical functions as well as the binomial expansion and Taylor formula.’
      • ‘One of the results on which al-Karaji uses this form of induction comes from his work on the binomial theorem, the binomial coefficients and the Pascal triangle.’
      • ‘Now Stirling's formula is a classical approximation for the factorial function, and factorials are one way to evaluate binomial coefficients.’
      • ‘There's a pretty simple formula for figuring out the binomial coefficients: Probability / Combinatorics’
      • ‘In fact we can be fairly sure that Khayyam used a method of finding nth roots based on the binomial expansion, and therefore on the binomial coefficients.’
      • ‘The two-tailed test of equal binomial proportions was also carried out, but the significance results were so similar to the results that they are not given here.’
      • ‘He improved methods for finding square and cube roots, and extended the method to the numerical solution of polynomial equations computing powers of sums using binomial coefficients constructed with Pascal's triangle.’
      • ‘I had not known about the halting problem, the number [Omega], or Lucas's curious theorem connecting the parity of binomial coefficients and the binary system.’
      • ‘Here Jia Xian is aware of the expansion of (a + b) n and gives a table of the resulting binomial coefficients in the form of Pascal's triangle.’
      • ‘In these graphs, vertical error bars represent 1 standard deviation, calculated from binomial statistics on the number of visits.’
      • ‘One can do this by basing the material on the Cox-Ross-Rubinstein theorem and the like, approximating the Black-Scholes model with discrete-time binomial trees.’
      • ‘The data were analyzed for statistical significance with a one-tailed binomial test with = 0.05.’
      • ‘The work contains binomial coefficients and the notation +, -,.’
  • 2Having or using two names, used especially of the Latin name of a species of living organism.

    • ‘The question of what name to apply to this or that binomial species was often left unresolved.’
    • ‘The trinomial naming system has been abandoned in favor of the usual binomial naming convention.’
    • ‘That is why it is called the binomial system - there is genus and species.’
    • ‘The two names make up the binomial species name.’
    • ‘The very structure of a binomial name encodes the essential property that makes Linnaeus's system consistent with life's evolutionary topology.’
    • ‘Only Cantino et al. have so far discussed and presented a number of proposals as to how the PhyloCode will deal with species, most of which involve taking existing binomial names and making them the names of species under their new system.’
    • ‘Several involve retaining the binomial name (genus, species: Homo sapiens) but formatting it differently to distinguish from clade names, so that human beings might become homosapiens in the Hominid clade.’
    • ‘But the nature of quartz, and the basis of relationships among minerals in general, defies the required logic of causality for any system legitimately described in Linnaean binomial terms.’
    • ‘Linnaeus's consistency and wisdom in developing and defending the binomial system of hierarchical classification carried him through to intellectual victory.’
    • ‘Genes are labeled with the species binomial two-letter abbreviation.’
    • ‘Gmelin attributed to Chemnitz's species the binomial name Arca pectinata.’
    • ‘Paleontologists and biologists have the honor of giving a two-word name, or binomial, to any new species they formally describe in the scientific literature, and the rules for naming are relatively few.’
    • ‘Despite the fact that traces are not organisms the Linnaean binomial scheme is used to name them, but only to the level of ichnogenus and ichnospecies.’
    • ‘If we were to insist that every binomial consist of two real Latin words - words known to the Romans - then perhaps there might be trouble ahead.’
    • ‘The name of our species, using both parts of the binomial designation, is Homo sapiens, not sapiens.’
    • ‘This binomial system rapidly became the standard system for naming species.’
    • ‘In the Linnaean system of classification, the generic status of a species is part of its binomial name, and it is therefore important that the classification at the level of genus is consistent at least in related groups of organisms.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French binôme or modern Latin binomium (from bi- having two + Greek nomos part, portion) + -al.

Pronunciation:

binomial

/bīˈnōmēəl/