Definition of binational in English:

binational

adjective

  • Concerning or consisting of two nations.

    • ‘The reason we're doing a binational, a U.S.-Canadian task force investigation, is to get the right answers so that people have the comfort of mind that this isn't going to happen again.’
    • ‘It was also decided to establish a binational commission with oil-rich Equatorial Guinea to strengthen relations and South Africa would soon open its first diplomatic mission in Malabo.’
    • ‘Are there any instances of a colonial settler state offering binational solutions or repeatedly accepting international partition plans in order to arrive at an accommodation with the indigenous population?’
    • ‘We realise that it will take a binational campaign, in both East Timor and Australia, to change the position of your government.’
    • ‘Binationalism, as a general category, need not be equated - as Lama Abu-Odeh equates it - with the specific proposal for a binational state as opposed to a two-state solution.’
    • ‘You may remember Sanchez, the director of Homies Unidos, a binational group working to broker a peace between rival gangs here and in El Salvador.’
    • ‘President Thabo Mbeki and his Algerian counterpart, President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, condemned international terrorism at the close of a binational meeting on Wednesday.’
    • ‘Once the two state solution if permanently off the table, the only one left will be a binational, secular, democratic state.’
    • ‘His core sense evolved into advocacy for a binational state as the most humane and just solution.’
    • ‘This week's Forward reports on an interesting interview with him in which his train of thought is on full display: ‘Embattled academic Tony Judt defends call for binational state.’’
    • ‘Instead of this, I would propose a one-state binational solution.’
    • ‘The conference, he says, was meant to be a first step toward creating formal networks of collaboration for a binational movement to fight the injustices brought about by corporate globalization.’
    • ‘Citigroup is offering what it calls binational credit cards.’
    • ‘The result would be a binational democracy, like Belgium.’
    • ‘A year ago, I was interviewed in Sweden by someone who was very enthusiastic about the idea of a binational or post-national state.’
    • ‘In one of their first public events, members of the binational organization recently joined a Juarez group, Voces Sin Eco, or Voices Without Echo, on a trip to the spot where the eight bodies were found in November.’
    • ‘The answer is easy: by continuing to negate the binational reality of the country, together with its history and memory.’
    • ‘Proposals proliferated for a new constitutional arrangement: special status for Quebec, the construction of the federal level along binational lines, Quebec sovereignty linked to a Canadian economic association.’
    • ‘Following that model, the secession amendment would call for the creation a binational panel composed of one representative from Canada, one from the seceding province, and a mutually agreed upon arbitrator.’
    • ‘Regardless of what one thinks of the new historians or the binational proposal, the book is still useful revisionist history.’

Pronunciation:

binational

/ˌbīˈnaSH(ə)n(ə)l/