Definition of bequeath in US English:

bequeath

verb

[with object]
  • 1Leave (a personal estate or one's body) to a person or other beneficiary by a will.

    ‘he bequeathed his art collection to the town’
    ‘an identical sum was bequeathed by Margaret’
    • ‘By his will dated 8th June 1956 he appointed the Mother to be his executrix and bequeathed all his property whatsoever or wheresoever to her.’
    • ‘She bequeathed all her property equally among her children.’
    • ‘Traditionally, not only property is bequeathed, but social and political position as well.’
    • ‘If the executors do not appear, but the claimant can prove by inquest that the testator bequeathed him the tenement, it shall be delivered to him.’
    • ‘So I intend to bequeath my property to a charity.’
    • ‘Eyre Square was originally bequeathed to the people of the city in 1710 by Mayor Edward Eyre.’
    • ‘He appointed her as his personal representative and bequeathed to her his personal property, consisting of the City Road premises.’
    • ‘In my experience, actual wills have been drawn up bequeathing property to persons, when the testator (person making the will) did not have ownership of the property, and thus did not have the right to give the property to anyone.’
    • ‘Most of them are from his estate which was bequeathed by his heirs to the State Russian Museum in today's St. Petersburg.’
    • ‘The principle of freedom of testation leaves a person free to choose who should benefit from the estate, and there is nothing to prevent him bequeathing everything to charity.’
    • ‘Parents bequeath property to their children in equal shares.’
    • ‘The individual owner, of course, may in turn sell, give or bequeath his property to any other individual or to the state.’
    • ‘Despite the changes to regulations in this area, many will still find they are forced to use savings or property they hoped to bequeath to family to fund long-term care.’
    • ‘The majority of the museum's major collections were donated or bequeathed by individuals.’
    • ‘In England, ex-offenders could be stripped of their property, denied the right to bequeath or inherit property, and barred from bringing suit or performing other legal functions.’
    • ‘Such properties can also be legally bequeathed without capital gains tax.’
    • ‘Things look especially grim for him when they learn the actress had bequeathed him a ranch property in America worth quite a sum.’
    • ‘If there is a legally drawn up will, property is bequeathed by the estate holder.’
    • ‘But when he dies he is to bequeath what is left in the manner agreed upon.’
    • ‘The Standish Collection was bequeathed to King Louis-Philippe of France and was eventually sold in London in 1853.’
    leave, leave in one's will, will, make over, pass on, hand on, hand down, cede, consign, commit, entrust, grant, transfer, convey
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Pass (something) on or leave (something) to someone else.
      ‘he is ditching the unpopular policies bequeathed to him’
      • ‘Such is the system of administration bequeathed by the past two decades.’
      • ‘The country's colonial past has bequeathed a wealth of Indonesian restaurants.’
      • ‘The lava-rich soil bequeathed by Etna makes this part of Sicily extremely fertile.’
      • ‘To finalize the transfer of a license, the Liquor Control Board must bequeath its stamp of approval.’
      • ‘Humans who developed a spiritual sense thrived and bequeathed that trait to their offspring.’
      • ‘By not adequately working to build a political database, he bequeathed no organizational capacity to those who might come after him.’
      • ‘Substantive principles of rationality are always framed in the light of beliefs and ways of life bequeathed by a past that could have turned out otherwise.’
      • ‘And he won't talk about the $4.6 trillion deficit he is bequeathing the nation or about wages.’
      • ‘Each region bequeaths its own brand of craft skills and the results are so variegated that the categories run into the hundreds.’
      • ‘Islam and the Arabic language have bequeathed the Arabic alphabet for languages like Farsi, Urdu, Old Hausa and others.’
      • ‘"He wants to bequeath control to his sons, " alleges an insider.’
      • ‘Hurricane Katrina ‘is giving our nation a glimpse of the climate chaos we are bequeathing our children.’’
      • ‘Imperial powers bequeathed the nation-state system to their colonies, but it has not worked well in either part of the world.’
      • ‘In a way, the medical profession bequeathed these techniques to practitioners of folk medicine.’
      • ‘The most significant difference from 2001 is the looming change in the leadership election rules bequeathed by the former leader.’
      • ‘The Junior player kindly bequeathed his sweatshirt, which cost him $11 at the inmate store.’
      • ‘This is a concept bequeathed by the President, describing how to combine state planning with today's market economics.’
      • ‘Just because they inherited a political and administrative tangle, it shouldn't inevitably follow that they bequeath an environmental disaster.’
      • ‘The spiralling costs of the upgrade of the Memorial Baths would appear to jeopardise other worthwhile community projects and bequeath a burden of debt on the city and its ratepayers for many years to come.’
      • ‘But above all, his mistake was to assume that he had done enough to win simply by being competent in office and by bequeathing a healthy economy.’
      hand down, hand on, pass on, impart, transmit
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English becwethan, from be- ‘about’ (expressing transitivity) + cwethan ‘say’ (see quoth).

Pronunciation