Definition of Beltane in English:

Beltane

noun

  • An ancient Celtic festival celebrated on May Day.

    • ‘For example, they celebrate summer in a fertility rite known as Beltane.’
    • ‘When the wheel begins to turn, soon the Beltane fires will burn.’
    • ‘The May Day celebration of Beltane, involving bonfires on hilltops, has seen a revival.’
    • ‘At Beltane, we honor the sacred marriage of the Lord and Lady and celebrate the pleasures of the physical realm.’
    • ‘Traditionally it is the Celtic festival of Beltane and the pagan festival celebrating the first spring planting, only in recent times has it evolved into a day of political and social protests.’
    • ‘This makes the crucial link between the festival of May Day, the Beltane festival of fertility.’
    • ‘This was celebrated by the festival of Beltane (commonly called May Day, now).’
    • ‘Two of my friends, Jenny and Sara, volunteered on short notice to conduct the Beltane ritual for our group.’
    • ‘It can be as simple as waking early to watch the sun rise on Beltane morning and wash your face in the dew.’
    • ‘The former took place in the beginning of May, and was called Beltane or ‘Fire of God.’’
    • ‘All these years, Beltane has been my special holiday.’
    • ‘We erected a Maypole for our first Beltane on this land and have celebrated with a Dance every year since.’
    • ‘To the ancient Celts, spring signified fertility and growth, as marked by Beltane, or May Day, one of the four pagan fire festivals to mark the seasons.’
    • ‘Part of a sacred landscape cherished by Neolithic man 5,500 years ago was the setting yesterday for a modern version of a pagan ceremony to mark the ancient festival of Beltane.’
    • ‘Around its trunk are ribbons and cords from last year's Beltane celebration whereby I asked my friends to hang ribbons denoting their wishes for the coming year.’
    • ‘The ancient Celts and Saxons celebrated May 1st as Beltane or the day of fire.’
    • ‘Oatcakes had some importance as festive foods, especially at Beltane (1 May, an ancient Celtic festival) and Christmas.’
    • ‘It stands exactly half a year away from another ancient festival of May Day, or Beltane when the seed had been sown, the harvest was awaited and animals were once more being driven out to find fresh grasses.’
    • ‘September passed and October brought one of my favorite holidays, Samhain, or better known as Halloween, my other favorite holiday was Beltane and that was in May.’
    • ‘We held several meetings leading up to Beltane to discuss our various paths and what we each would like to include in the ritual.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Scottish Gaelic bealltainn.

Pronunciation

Beltane

/ˈbeltān/