Definition of becalm in English:

becalm

Pronunciation: /bəˈkäm//bəˈkälm/

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Leave (a sailing vessel) unable to move through lack of wind.

    • ‘On the way home between Sardinia and Corsica the boat is becalmed and Newman writes a poem.’
    • ‘After moving men and dunnage to the two ships, it seemed almost at the moment he was about to give the order to set sail, they were becalmed.’
    • ‘And, when the ship becomes becalmed, mutinous impulses begin to rumble beneath the surface.’
    • ‘Menelaus recounts his own journey and tells how he was becalmed for twenty days.’
    • ‘On the long haul to Scotland they even attempted to row the 36 ft long boat at a stage when they were becalmed on the east side of the Mull of Galloway.’
    • ‘In many ways, the later years of a marriage are like Newton's theory of gravity, which says that two vessels becalmed and alone on the wide ocean will ineluctably drift together.’
    • ‘To make the point, he recounted the tale of a group of English merchants who, when their ship was becalmed at the mouth of the Thames decided to go ashore in search of a good breakfast.’
    • ‘This would give them leeway to rest during days when it was against them, or they were becalmed with no wind at all.’
    • ‘When his ship was becalmed for three days, his men grew alarmed, thinking that they had reached a shore and were in imminent danger of running aground.’
    • ‘Unlike the previous Thursday where the fleet was becalmed, there was plenty of wind with some heavy gusts.’
    • ‘On reaching the Bay of Biscay the wind died down and we were becalmed for 9 days.’
    • ‘On the way, they were becalmed on the Island of the cattle of the sun.’
    • ‘Of course, there are times when the weather doesn't change much; then you might be like a sail boat becalmed in the middle of the lake.’
    • ‘On the boat they were becalmed without sun or stars.’
    • ‘If, like me, you have spent endless summer afternoons sweatily becalmed in Long Island Sound, there's a lot to be said for a rail-down bash to windward, especially after it's over.’
    • ‘Warships at this time were propelled by a number of oarsmen which rowed the boat if it came becalmed or it was necessary to manoeuvre it in battle.’
    • ‘After a good first leg down to Beech Hill, Falcon turned first with a healthy lead but Pilgrim and Merrymaid hung on downwind before the whole fleet was becalmed south of Rampholme.’
    • ‘The fleet is becalmed at Aulis after its first abortive attempt because Agamemnon has angered the goddess Artemis by killing a stag in her sacred grove.’
    • ‘He built a fort on Pigeon Island on which he perched his telescope; through which he squinted, discovering to unabated delight that his old French foe, Admiral De Grasse, was becalmed along with his naval fleet.’
    • ‘The short first beat to a dan buoy near the Steamboat Museum gave an indication of unpredictable conditions, some boats sailing steadily to the mark while others a short distance away were becalmed.’
    stranded, stuck, marooned, motionless, at a halt, still, at a standstill, unmoving
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Pronunciation:

becalm

/bəˈkäm//bəˈkälm/