Definition of beam in English:

beam

noun

  • 1A long, sturdy piece of squared timber or metal spanning an opening or part of a building, usually to support the roof or floor above.

    • ‘An alternative would be to acquire some of the expensive freestone, and use that to make the door or window frame, supported by wooden beams during the building process.’
    • ‘This is fitted with white wall and floor units and an integrated oven, and has a pitched ceiling with exposed timber beams and an oak floor.’
    • ‘The village pub dates back to the 15th century and the renovation sees its original oak beams and tiled floors on full display.’
    • ‘The first scene set in the interior of the shop uses the tiled floor and roof beams to establish orthogonals and transversals.’
    • ‘The low, irregular ceiling is crisscrossed with beams made from ships' timbers and a log fire crackles merrily in the hearth.’
    • ‘The college is a big high building and it has very thick oak beams to support the ceiling.’
    • ‘This features a quarry tiled floor, oak timber beams and numerous storage presses.’
    • ‘Some of the principal beams, old ship's timbers, survived although they look rather lonely, silhouetted against the sky.’
    • ‘Here, behind the building's exposed beams, Sze stacked scores of small white jewelry boxes into precarious ziggurats.’
    • ‘The smallest table measures three metres by four metres and can shake in any direction, simulating a quake and testing the movement of beams and columns.’
    • ‘This has a dark flagstone floor, exposed roof beams, a Stanley oil-fired range with a tiled backdrop and an attractive stone surround.’
    • ‘The concave roof of the island building, supported by beams suspended in tension, has its center in the sky.’
    • ‘Wood flooring, room-spanning collar-tie beams, and a refinished wood ceiling blend the spaces together.’
    • ‘The slab is designed as a continuous plate supported by the floor beams and edge girders.’
    • ‘The breakfast room has a tiled floor and exposed roof beams.’
    • ‘These joists were the ceiling beams for the first floor great room.’
    • ‘All the rooms feature natural stone tiled floors and exposed beams.’
    • ‘But the deck doesn't flatten out because the horizontal beam underneath holds it in place.’
    • ‘Inside, a lofty ceiling with exposed beams helps keep the non-air-conditioned space well-ventilated.’
    • ‘The finished apartments will have exposed original timber beams, oak flooring, glazed balconies and spiral staircases.’
    • ‘A timber deck is supported on I beams which transfer its loads to the hoops.’
    • ‘With sturdy metal beams as their building blocks, architects and engineers could erect monumental skyscrapers hundreds of feet in the air.’
    • ‘It transpired that the oak beam supporting the floor had collapsed.’
    • ‘The kitchen has a tiled floor, roof beams, ceiling spotlights and a fitted oven, hob and grill.’
    • ‘He didn't trust the crumbling clay-and-straw roof, much less the rickety wooden beams supporting the second floor.’
    joist, purlin, girder, spar, support, strut, stay, brace, scantling, batten, transom, lintel, stringer, baulk, board, timber, plank, lath, rafter
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    1. 1.1
      another term for balance beam
      • ‘Although she had troubles on bars and beam, she showed great promise for the future.’
      • ‘This action is also seen in gymnastics in free exercise and beam routines, in the backhand stroke in racket sports, and in softball batting.’
      • ‘On the beam, in the floor exercises and on the vault she demonstrated original elements for the first time in the world.’
      • ‘The team was impressive especially on beam where gymnasts after gymnast nailed difficult combinations.’
      • ‘Khorkina fell from bars and beam but managed a bronze medal on the floor exercise.’
      • ‘His final result of 39.025 could have been higher if it were not for an error in coming off the beam.’
      • ‘Raducan had been the defending World and World Cup champion on both beam and floor exercise.’
      • ‘On beam, she missed valuable connections and removed some of her bonus elements for an 8.750.’
      • ‘When the gymnast misses the beam the device instantly picks up the slack on the gym elastics, preventing her crashing to the ground.’
      • ‘She made it in the Zone meet Wednesday and made some nice improvements on bars and beam.’
      • ‘But bars and beam are both my strongest events, and they are less demanding on my back.’
      • ‘In the event finals held Wednesday, Dong added the golds on vault, beam, and floor exercise to her all-around and team golds.’
      • ‘Nancy Smith is another gymnast and enjoys exercising on the bars, beam and the vault.’
      • ‘The water rushing underneath the beam had a slightly dizzying effect on her, but she had to keep her eyes on the beam so she could tell where she was putting her feet.’
      • ‘Her teammate was Maria's only real rival, but blew her chances with a fall from the beam.’
      • ‘I think they were especially successful in the floor exercises, the beam and the vaults.’
      • ‘She showed great form, expressive dance and world class difficulty on bars and beam.’
      • ‘I started working the sideways back handspring on beam before I saw her do it.’
      • ‘American junior Courtney Kupets also qualified to all four events, and led the field on bars and beam.’
      • ‘Good in all exercises, but excels on the asymmetrical bars and the beam.’
      • ‘When we think of women swinging on bars, somersaulting on beams, tumbling on carpets and soaring over vaults at the Olympic Games, we do not necessarily think of Pamela Anderson.’
    2. 1.2 A horizontal piece of squared timber or metal supporting the deck and joining the sides of a ship.
      • ‘The vessel's massive beam - nearly 30 feet at its widest - provides both stability and comfort.’
      • ‘At the aft end of the ventilation hatches, a curved beam spans the deck.’
      • ‘The entire deck is supported by steel beams with a complete steel deck over the cabin and engineroom.’
      • ‘It is mounted on a support beam under my rear deck.’
      • ‘One part of the outer hull is punctured by a support beam from the larger ship.’
      • ‘I had never dived on a real pirate ship, and I imagined fully rigged masts, broad wooden beams, and a blonde-haired damsel gracing the bow of an eerie ghost ship.’
      • ‘Startled, I jerked my hand away, smacking my head on one of the upper deck's support beams in the process.’
    3. 1.3Nautical The direction of an object visible from the port or starboard side of a ship when it is perpendicular to the center line of the vessel.
      ‘there was land in sight on the port beam’
      • ‘A Republican Navy cruiser slid into position off the liner's starboard beam.’
      • ‘Just to Doremi's side a seagull was flying, keeping time with the ship as both moved north, with the sun to their starboard beam.’
      • ‘The next challenge was to dodge the shipping as it headed to and from Lands End just off the port beam.’
      • ‘He was then told she was in sight on the starboard beam.’
      • ‘The whales surfaced again about half a mile off the port beam, having dived beneath us, then turned north and headed towards Mazatlan.’
    4. 1.4 A ship's breadth at its widest point.
      ‘a cutter with a beam of 16 feet’
      • ‘With her three pearl white parallel hulls she had a 25-foot beam.’
      • ‘Built in 2000, the M/Y Harmony G is a small ship with a beam of 20 feet and draft of 10 feet.’
      • ‘The new vessel is almost two metres longer than their previous one and, coupled with a wider beam, means it is capable of being launched in more stormy conditions.’
      • ‘She is one hundred and sixty eight feet in length, twenty four feet across the beam and weighs 330 tons.’
      • ‘She was constructed of teak and reported as being 84 tons, 56 feet in length and having a beam of 18 feet 6 inches.’
      • ‘This is really a very large boat with a beam of 8-foot 6-inches and a hull weight of an astonishing 4900 pounds.’
    5. 1.5informal [in singular] The width of a person's hips.
      ‘notice how broad in the beam she's getting?’
      • ‘Annick is, to use one of my mother's expressions, a little broad in the beam.’
      • ‘He had a touch of Jennifer Lopez's Latin good looks, but was less broad in the beam.’
      • ‘But Lycra isn't for everyone, especially anyone who is broad in the beam or self-conscious.’
      • ‘To put it politely she was a little "broad in the beam" and we couldn't quite squeeze her into the entrance.’
      • ‘She is, at 53, shorter than you'd expect, broad in the beam and still so extravagantly beautiful she appears unreal.’
      wideness, breadth, broadness, thickness, spread, span, diameter, girth
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    6. 1.6 The main stem of a stag's antler.
      • ‘In all cases, they consist of a single tine removed from a palmate section of an antler beam.’
      • ‘Because the main beam of a buck swoops to the rear and then juts forward, it can trick the eye.’
      • ‘To make one, use a hacksaw to sever a section of the main beam, and hollow out the softer center with a rotary rasp.’
      • ‘One of those bucks would have to have an inside spread, as measured by the greatest length between main antler beams, of at least 13 inches.’
      • ‘The main beam of an Elk’s antlers can reach up to 5 feet in length.’
    7. 1.7 The crossbar of a balance.
      • ‘The most usual Irish term for a balance in general, and also for the beam of a balance, was meadh [ma], which is the word in use at the present day.’
      • ‘Directions indicated by the beam of a balance or a hanging plummet are called horizontal or vertical, respectively.’
      • ‘A triple-beam balance gets its name because it has three beams that allow you to move known masses along the beam.’
      • ‘The sequence of the above manifestations decidedly suggests the swing of a pendulum or beam of a balance in coming to rest, and for this widespread phenomenon the name oscillatory effect is proposed.’
      • ‘The original form of a weighing scale consisted of a beam with a fulcrum at its center.’
    8. 1.8 (especially in a stationary steam engine) an oscillating shaft through which the vertical piston movement is transmitted to the crank or pump.
      • ‘This also means that the beam can be balanced since the piston does equal work on both motions.’
      • ‘The two pistons are connected to the beam by a complicated formation of rods known as a parallel linkage which, as a consequence of careful geometric design, transmit power in an exact vertical line.’
      • ‘During each revolution the top beam of the connecting rod goes from horizontal to an angle as the piston rods are in a fixed plane some means of extending the beam is required.’
      • ‘The up and down motion of the piston in the cylinder is transmitted by the beam to the piston in the water pump.’
    9. 1.9historical The main timber of a horse-drawn plow.
      • ‘The traditional wooden plough (maresha; Figure 1) has a pointed metal tine fitted to a handle and held by a metal hook suspended from the beam of the plough on an adjustable leather strap.’
      • ‘The traditional form of plough made by local workshops in Gloucestershire had a very distinctive long wooden beam and long straight-surfaced mouldboard.’
      • ‘Through the beam there runs a wooden pole which serves to fasten the beam to the plough-body and share.’
      • ‘You can see the shiny mouldboards above and below the central beam of the plough.’
      • ‘These were known as a crooked ploughs because the beam curved forwards to the draft animal.’
  • 2A ray or shaft of light.

    ‘a beam of light flashed in front of her’
    ‘the flashlight beam dimmed perceptibly’
    • ‘Natural light seeps through to every sump, and it is magical to drift through the maze of stalactites studded with reflective crystals, the light dancing in the beams of our torches.’
    • ‘I can remember trying a new, high-powered, high-voltage HID lamp with a very wide beam and ruining the night dive for all the other divers with me.’
    • ‘When he pressed a button on the phone, a wide blue beam shone on the pot and bucket.’
    • ‘She saw the beam of light of the night watcher's flashlight turning from the corner, moving forward along the corridor towards her.’
    • ‘It stopped when a beam of light flashed upon it from behind.’
    • ‘Distances even to the nearest star - it takes a beam of light four whole years - are bewilderingly large.’
    • ‘Lighthouses are like isolated watchmen, flashing their warning beam of light in the night sky.’
    • ‘Diana had to cover her eyes, one of the beams were centred right on her.’
    • ‘Isis stepped out into the dim room, illuminated only by a thin beam of light coming from beneath a door a few yards away.’
    • ‘It is a neutron star spinning just under 100 times per second and emitting regular radio pulses like a lighthouse beam.’
    • ‘By night, a beam of light at the base of the monument would illuminate the night sky’
    • ‘It throws a beam of light which is so powerful it could be seen from the moon.’
    • ‘Turning my torch on, I guide its beam towards the dock wall.’
    • ‘The ferocious energy shot into the sky, and the colossal beam was visible from miles around, until slowly, it faded away.’
    • ‘As he stepped into a dim beam of light, I could make out his face; the face of a tortured man whose entire life had been called into question.’
    • ‘She sits for her entire first act with a single beam of light on her face, which is boldly unflattering but dramatic, and who can hate that?’
    • ‘These selective or directional cells are produced by base stations that send out narrow beams at the entrances to tunnels or along roads in rural areas.’
    • ‘A wide bright red beam emerged from the staff, shooting up to the ceiling and beyond.’
    • ‘A small lantern may seem like an odd item to include on this list, but Reid said lantern light makes a blood trail much more visible than the direct beam of a flashlight.’
    • ‘The double doors to his room had opened slightly, allowing a stray beam of light to stream into the dark room.’
    ray, shaft, stream, streak, pencil, finger
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    1. 2.1 A directional flow of particles or radiation.
      ‘beams of electrons’
      • ‘When a beam of such energetic electrons collides with an atom, gamma rays burst forth.’
      • ‘Depending on the atomic species, ion beams can be used to dope semiconductors even as they carve out circuit patterns.’
      • ‘The experiment was to study the properties beams of radioactive isotopes created at the Bevatron.’
      • ‘They determine how the radiation beams should be arranged to best destroy the tumor and spare the normal tissues surrounding the tumor.’
      • ‘The gamma knife is a focused array of 201 intercepting beams of gamma radiation.’
      • ‘When high-energy beams of radiation pass through the food, it damages the DNA of these microorganisms.’
      • ‘In a Bose-Einstein condensate, a clump of atoms shares the same quantum wave function, just like the photons in a laser beam.’
      • ‘An aspect of the present invention includes a method for homogenizing a beam of electromagnetic radiation.’
      • ‘Radiotherapy involves the exposure of parts of the body to radiation, beams of high-energy X-rays, gamma rays or particles.’
      • ‘Operated by trained Customs staff, the scanners work by transmitting an X-ray beam at the target vehicle or container.’
      • ‘The reason: the electrons in the beam are particles with mass.’
      • ‘To probe the electroweak force, future experiments will collide beams of high-energy electrons with those of positrons.’
      • ‘The data were reduced taking into account the neutron beam transmission through the quartz substrate and corrected for the background.’
      • ‘An optical communication system for transmitting multiple optical beams, each at a different wavelength is disclosed.’
      • ‘Once upon a time, it was chiefly the tool of physicists who used beams of charged particles to explore the things that make atoms.’
      • ‘Designed much like a compound microscope, the electron microscope uses a beam of electrons focused through magnetic lenses.’
      • ‘A second method for creating controlled nuclear fusion makes use of a laser beam or a beam of electrons or atoms.’
      • ‘When nanotubes were placed inside cells and radiated by the laser beam, the cells were quickly destroyed by the heat.’
      • ‘As a test sample, the IBM team created a dilute system of single electron spins by irradiating a block of glass with a weak beam of gamma rays.’
      • ‘Now imagine we've got two laser beams hitting the atom, one coming from the left, the other from the right.’
    2. 2.2 A series of radio or radar signals emitted to serve as a navigational guide for ships or aircraft.
      • ‘Unfortunately, radar beam refraction over the lakes remains poorly understood.’
      • ‘It is true that, in bad weather, radar beams can be reflected off waves, causing false echoes or making the screen unreadable.’
      • ‘This modulation can be monitored by the diffraction efficiency of a probe beam (TG signal).’
      • ‘Radar detectors do just what their name implies - they detect the radar beams that are emitted from a police officer or state trooper's radar guns.’
      • ‘The phased array radar provides instantaneous beam steering which gives the advantage of vast reaction time against airborne threats.’
      • ‘Snowflakes grow rapidly as cloud temperatures rise towards 0 deg C, but this level may be below the radar beam.’
      • ‘The beams would guide a pilot to the airstrip, but in conditions of zero visibility, they did not provide altitude.’
      • ‘That's the radar beam actually shooting up through the eye of this storm.’
      • ‘The spacecraft also examined the properties of the Venusian atmosphere in ultra-violet light and measured how radio beams are deflected by the clouds.’
      • ‘The surrounding glacially scoured landscape is also generally free of topography that can obstruct the radar's beam.’
      • ‘The two transmitted beams cross at the lower troposphere, bouncing back to the receiving end.’
      • ‘The unit installs at the transom and emits sonar beams that ‘look’ out to 240 feet on either side of the boat.’
      • ‘The transceiver sends out a radar beam into the environment that reflects off whatever it hits.’
      • ‘In addition to detecting enemy aircraft, the radar beam also echoed from precipitation, which proved a valuable tool in war planning.’
      • ‘The system reflected the radar beam off the ionosphere to detect objects from ranges of 500 to nearly 2,000 miles.’
      • ‘Not reflected sunlight, but reflected radar beams read by satellite, have given Antarctica new dimensions.’
      • ‘The radar system will also incorporate the agile beam steering capabilities developed for the APG - 77.’
      • ‘Radar beams penetrated through Venus's thick cloud layers to reveal these surface images of both sides.’
      • ‘So in 1985 the Navy launched Geosat, a satellite that measured the height of the sea surface by bouncing a radar beam off it.’
      • ‘This causes the upward-looking beam of an airport radar to be refracted downward so it is reflected off of autos, ships, and surface objects.’
      warning fire, warning light, signal fire, signal light, bonfire, smoke signal, signal, danger signal, guiding light
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  • 3[in singular] A radiant or good-natured look or smile.

    ‘a beam of satisfaction’
    • ‘A wide beam spread across my face in realisation at what lay in front of us.’
    • ‘The beam of satisfaction from the children after counting to 20 or writing the English alphabet on their slate perfectly is one I will remember for a long time.’
    • ‘The baby was a tiny piece of heaven, always smiling his adorable toothless beam, and batting those long lashes as he reached out to touch everything.’
    • ‘The blond-haired boy bit his lip as a wide beam spread over his face.’
    • ‘‘Morning ladies’ she greeted, still smiling with that I-can-do-no-wrong beam.’
    grin, smile, bright look
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verb

  • 1[with object] Transmit (a radio signal or broadcast) in a specified direction.

    ‘beaming a distress signal into space’
    [no object] ‘the TV station begins beaming into homes in the new year’
    • ‘This signal cannot carry as much information as a high-gain signal where the available power is concentrated to beam the signal accurately back to its target.’
    • ‘The reading will be beamed by satellite to television and radio stations around the world.’
    • ‘The researchers conducted their experiments by beaming radio waves at aquariums stocked with different species of aquatic life.’
    • ‘Traditional analogue signals, which have beamed television into homes across the country since transmissions started, are to be withdrawn.’
    • ‘The signals are then beamed back into space, and broadcast by three civilian geostationary satellites.’
    • ‘The microwave-based system operates on the basis of line-of-sight signals, whereby a signal is beamed from a mast to the receiver on the television set.’
    • ‘BBC World Service programmes in Spanish are beamed by satellite to more than 20 stations in Mexico and more than 100 throughout Latin America.’
    • ‘A network of TV and radio stations beams its message across the airwaves.’
    • ‘Data will be beamed using FM radio frequencies that currently allow you see station IDs on your tuner's display.’
    • ‘In one experiment, Clementine beamed radio signals into shadowed craters near the Moon's south pole.’
    • ‘The data is stored in the helmet after a hit and then beamed by radio waves to a computer on the sidelines.’
    • ‘The same airwaves used to beam wireless phone calls can be used to transmit Net data.’
    • ‘A global Christian organisation already beams a shortwave signal from transmitters just outside Kununurra.’
    • ‘They're more amenable to control within State borders than radio waves beamed out from transmission towers, relay stations and satellites.’
    • ‘The moment will be beamed by satellite transmission to television and radio stations around the world.’
    • ‘The satellite broadcast is being beamed out to more than 30 regional locations around the UK.’
    • ‘The basic pulsar model involves a magnetic dipole field tilted with respect to the rotation axis, beaming radio waves along the dipole axis as the star spins.’
    • ‘The live coverage by the three channels, which experts estimate beams into tens of millions of Arab homes, plays a key role in shaping how this part of the world views a conflict.’
    • ‘The concert is expected to be beamed to venues in Glasgow, Aberdeen, Dundee, Stirling and Inverness.’
    • ‘A donated satellite truck will be parked outside, beaming daily newscasts into over 1 million homes.’
    broadcast, transmit, relay, put out, send out, disseminate
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    1. 1.1beam someone up/down (in science fiction) transport someone instantaneously to another place, especially to or from a spaceship.
      ‘Scotty, beam me up!’
      • ‘Head to the transporter room and I'll beam you down.’
      • ‘The team from the Starship Enterprise have been beamed down.’
      • ‘Kildare Town residents were bemused when a statue of Lord Edward Fitzgerald appeared in Market Square recently as if he appeared by magic or as if aliens had beamed him down.’
      • ‘Quantum entanglement-the mysterious phenomenon that allows a quantum state to be transmitted huge distances apparently instantaneously-may never allow Scotty to beam you up, but it could do wonders for chip manufacture.’
      • ‘Up here you have to at least be waiting for the mother ship behind the comet to arrive in orbit, beam you up, and take you to the outer rim of the galaxy before people give you a second glance.’
      • ‘They ought to beam him down to us, to demonstrate the existence of intelligent civic life on the planet Northern Ireland.’
      • ‘Rushwind activates his wrist-comm and tells them to prepare to beam them up.’
      • ‘You better beam me up, and we'll attack his starship while he's down here.’
      • ‘Then she initiated the transporter, and Sailor Engineer Galetea was beamed down to the Jupiter Colony.’
      • ‘Sailor Ensign Chino said that she was only able to beam us down in a deserted area just to the southeast of the city.’
      • ‘The Hudson is a hip hotel, the kind of place where the bar floor is lit from below and the showers look like they could beam you up.’
      • ‘Anyway, this bunch of geeks at ANU managed to do this thing, dreaming of Star Trek and Scotty beaming them up.’
      • ‘I'll go find Himeko so she can beam us down into the Colony.’
      • ‘Juno followed in, just as Tamika had Himeko beam them down.’
      • ‘Himeko, I need you to beam us down to the Second Moon Base.’
      • ‘On the starship Enterprise, all Captain Kirk and his ‘Star Trek’ crew just have to signal Scottie the engineer to beam them up with the pull of a lever.’
  • 2[no object] (of a light or light source) shine brightly.

    ‘the sun's rays beamed down’
    • ‘Light suddenly beamed out as a door slammed against a wall from below her.’
    • ‘I turned back around looking straight at her, as the cabin lights were beaming into my eyes.’
    • ‘He ran his hand through his hair and closed his eyes as the sun rays beamed down on him.’
    • ‘Suddenly, a bright light beamed from the center of the tree, and a woman appeared before us.’
    • ‘It was exhilarating to stand in the store, glaring fluorescent light beaming down upon hundreds of shiny cases, each one containing a story.’
    • ‘For many people, external lighting seldom goes beyond a security light beaming down on the front garden to scare off intruders.’
    • ‘The sun rays beamed into the cavern, dancing across Kaloth's closed eyelids, causing him to awake.’
    • ‘Fluorescent lights beamed down on his unremarkable features.’
    • ‘Shane blinked a few times to get used to the bright rays of sunshine beaming in through the window.’
    • ‘Sunlight beaming through large windows gleamed off the bright linoleum floor.’
    • ‘The walls were covered with beautiful Christmas lights beaming all over.’
    • ‘In almost every town, big and small, street lights beam just as much light up and out as they do down, illuminating much more than just the street.’
    • ‘The floor shined from sunlight beaming in through the huge windows on the right side of the wall.’
    • ‘The bright lights were still beaming down as bright as ever.’
    • ‘The sun shined brightly and the rays of light beamed into the King and Queen's room as the windows were opened.’
    • ‘The light of the moon beamed down on them, illuminating the streets, not a single soul in sight to see the climax.’
    • ‘I awoke to the bright rays of sunlight beaming on me.’
    • ‘You could make out David's outline on your front steps, the huge Mercedes' lights beaming out upon the eternal darkness that was your yard.’
    • ‘We continued our journey, more identical doors whipping by, the fluorescent lights beaming into my face before sweeping over the cart's roof.’
    • ‘Suddenly, a bright light beamed on the werewolf's face, and it hid its eyes.’
    shine, radiate, glare, glitter, gleam, shimmer, glimmer, twinkle, flash, flare, streak
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  • 3[no object] Smile radiantly.

    ‘she beamed with pleasure’
    ‘a beaming smile’
    • ‘The Parisian beamed with a big smile, before going back to join his friends at his own table.’
    • ‘A slow smile and a brisk hello as the stall owner beams at me.’
    • ‘Organisers of the new Yorkshire Forward quality customer care scheme whose logo is a huge smile, are beaming with pleasure.’
    • ‘They greeted him warmly, their smiles beaming without their make-up.’
    • ‘Her voice was high pitched in anger, but it faded away once she caught a glimpse of that familiar smile beaming at her from the passenger seat of the car beside them.’
    • ‘They smile at me and beam with pride at their young charges.’
    • ‘Several hundred people chanted, cheered and danced as ‘London’ was read out, and smiles beamed from the faces of young and old.’
    • ‘Philip flushes as Libbie beams with satisfaction.’
    • ‘Audrey beamed and giggled, smiling at the camera's every now and then.’
    • ‘Tammy Armstrong sits in a café sipping coffee between ash blonde braids, a smile beaming across her face.’
    • ‘When Ritblat is friendly, his charm is total and his crocodile smile beams from his tanned face; when he is upset no one wants to be in the same room or at the other end of a telephone.’
    • ‘On the other side, the statue of the late Al Waxman, King of Kensington, beams down on us with its ever-present smile.’
    • ‘Emmeline rushed to where sister lie, a smile beaming on her face.’
    • ‘So when Irfan Pathan beams that dazzling smile after taking yet another wicket for the India he so proudly represents, he fills my heart with more than cricketing pride.’
    • ‘Sitting centre-stalls, listening to the opening bombast of the Brahms First, I saw the old-timers around me beam with relief and satisfaction.’
    • ‘People gawked and stared, and he stared back with a grin beaming from ear to ear.’
    • ‘On Sunday at beer time he was beaming and all smiles.’
    • ‘Melanie blushes and beams while Chris smiles and giggles.’
    • ‘Seeing the girl's sweet, youthful smile made Marius beam as well.’
    • ‘Grace was sitting at the wheel, beaming with a proud smile.’
    • ‘He kisses her and beams while she smiles strangely.’
    • ‘Sharon always faces the latest crisis head on, picks herself up, dusts herself off, beams that adorable smile and goes on.’
    grin, smile, dimple, grin like a cheshire cat, twinkle, smirk, laugh
    bright, cheery, sparkling, flashing, brilliant, dazzling, intense, gleaming, radiant
    grinning, smiling, laughing
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    1. 3.1[with object] Express (an emotion) with a radiant smile.
      ‘the teacher beamed her approval’
      [with direct speech] ‘“Isn't that wonderful, Beatrice?” beamed the nun’
      • ‘Akidan beamed her hate at Raymond in a single, evil glare.’
      • ‘As she stood straight again, beaming her radiance, the door opened revealing a rather exotic looking woman who was definitely not Giles.’
      • ‘The round Indian woman beamed her approval then shoved me into the back of the minivan.’
      • ‘Elaine's eyes beam their pleasure, which is so obvious that Beth winces inwardly.’
      • ‘For the first time since yesterday, Nazuna face formed a smile, and she beamed an incredulous look at Ryouseika's father.’
      • ‘Shock, surprise, fright, nervousness, anxiety, shyness, then finally pleasure as she beams a terrific smile at me.’
      • ‘He waved at presspersons, beaming his inimitable smile.’
      • ‘I turned to grin at my best friend who beamed right back.’
      • ‘When I approach to thank him for the dance, he clasps my hand and shakes it vigorously, beaming appreciation.’
      • ‘From somewhere beyond the majestic ceiling's painted clouds, Balanchine must have beamed approval.’
      • ‘She stood so confidently, her eyes and smile beaming some secret we may have shared.’
      • ‘Martina tries not to beam her pleasure too obviously.’
      • ‘Her hope was shot down when her friend beamed a happy smile and let her eyes sparkle,’
      • ‘I beamed my approval and choked down the lump in my throat.’
      • ‘The brunette's head sprang up and she beamed a truly cheerful smile.’
      • ‘Mr. Kessler beamed his approval at her improvement and Leslie walked with them out to Mr. Kessler's van.’
      • ‘The clerk beamed the same merry & insincere smile, and held up his source material: a Trivial Pursuit card.’
      • ‘Her smile beamed adoration, shining the glow of her affection upon her favorite son.’
      • ‘The Barbie looked at her, every bit of its plastic smile beaming its approval.’
      grinning, smiling, laughing
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  • 4beamedConstruct a ceiling with exposed beams.

    ‘vaulted beamed ceilings in the family room’
    • ‘The first reception room, a family room, is at hall level and features exposed brick walls, a beamed ceiling and a picture window overlooking the front garden.’
    • ‘The kitchen has a tiled floor, a range of wall and floor units, a beamed ceiling, extensive wall tiling and an integrated dishwasher.’
    • ‘An old wooden beamed ceiling over the dining room, beam ends painted with white stripes, parts to reveal a light-filled void.’
    • ‘There is a games room off the rear hallway with solid oak floorboards, a beamed ceiling and an exposed brick wall.’
    • ‘The house is full of character and is in good decorative order, with features such as natural oak doors, beamed ceilings and hardwood floors found throughout.’
    • ‘I took in my surroundings, the marble floors, plastered walls, and high beamed ceiling.’
    • ‘The television room, which is wallpapered in hues of blue, has a beamed ceiling and natural timber flooring.’
    • ‘Available for the same price, the thatched cottage has a Liscannor slate fireplace, oak timber flooring and a beamed ceiling - all on a two-acre plot.’
    • ‘It has four reception rooms, the most impressive of which is an oak panelled drawing room with beamed ceiling, a parquet floor and a brick fireplace with oak mantle.’
    • ‘At the moment, she was lying flat on her back on the training mat, staring vacantly up at the beamed ceiling.’
    • ‘The property has been refurbished throughout and features larch floors, a beamed ceiling and a country style kitchen.’
    • ‘The master bedroom has wooden floors and a lofted beamed ceiling.’
    • ‘The entrance hall with open tread staircase and polished parquet flooring leads to a drawing room and bar area with a beamed ceiling and a timber floor.’
    • ‘It had been reborn as a Medieval wayside tavern, complete with beamed ceiling, wattle-and-daub walls, and straw on the floor.’
    • ‘At the rear, the extended kitchen/breakfast room is a particularly spacious area with a tiled floor and a beamed ceiling with spotlighting.’
    • ‘Inside there are exposed walls and beamed ceilings, taking advantage of the barn's beautiful features.’
    • ‘It must have been an open porch when the house was built, then was enclosed and given a beamed ceiling at some point in its history.’
    • ‘In the living room, for instance, a brick fireplace, beamed ceiling, and beaded board walls set a textural background.’
    • ‘Set in 25 acres, it has four reception rooms with beamed ceilings, oak floors and period fireplaces’
    • ‘With its suits of armor, beamed ceilings, and arched doorways, there's a definite sense of being in a grand house.’

Phrases

  • a beam in one's eye

    • A fault that is greater in oneself than in the person one is finding fault with.

      • ‘The wood concept is later reinforced with the analogy that one should not complain about the poor spiritual vision of another (splinter in the eye) when one has a beam in their eye.’
      • ‘He does not think that he has a beam in his eye.’
      • ‘He is a beam in my eye!’
      • ‘I know there's a beam in my eye, so it's too bad I so enjoy pointing out the specks in others’.’
      • ‘These folks pretty much always have a beam in their eye.’
      • ‘The problem is that many people reverse this idea and argue that so long as we have the smallest mote in our eye, we cannot criticize another for having a beam in his eye.’
      • ‘The fact is that we all have a beam in our eye, but most people only see the sliver.’
      • ‘But, of course, others out there can sometimes notice the blockage, like a beam in our eye.’
  • off (or way off) beam

    • informal On the wrong track; mistaken.

      ‘you're way off beam on this one’
      • ‘So you get a variety of views, but some of them are way off beam.’
      • ‘Comments like the system is going to collapse I think are just way off beam.’
      • ‘In order to spare you any possible disappointment, I should say up front that Robinson is wrong - utterly and mind-bogglingly off beam.’
      • ‘Indeed much of the public reading of the party and its intentions has been seriously off beam for quite some time now.’
      • ‘The rivalry between the sides has become more intense with every passing year, and unless my calculations are off beam this will be their seventh meeting in the final in the last dozen years.’
      • ‘He has written at least two articles with which I heartily agree but today's is way off beam.’
      • ‘I don't know what Walsh's politics are, but his radar was certainly off beam and he has paid the price.’
      • ‘For one thing, the basic premise is completely off beam.’
      • ‘I believe ‘Neighbours’ became a preferred route only later in her development, so to claim that now as the basis for the management split seems way off beam to my thinking.’
      • ‘Palace were first to set their sights on goal but former Manchester United starlet Jovan Kirovski and Aki Riihilahti were way off beam with efforts from outside the box.’
      • ‘George Orwell wasn't wrong about much but he was way off beam with his famously jaundiced view of sport.’
      • ‘The trust has always endeavoured to provide low cost facilities to river users and the person who demands, as a right, that the work of the trust is available to them without charge is way off beam.’
      • ‘Well, the deduction may not be way off beam, but there are also those among youngsters who spend their time meaningfully.’
      • ‘I want to know, because his choice of songs is a little bit off beam if you ask me.’
      • ‘While we were occasionally off beam in the past at least our hearts were in the right place.’
      mistaken, incorrect, inaccurate, wrong, erroneous, off-target, out, on the wrong track, wide of the mark, awry
      View synonyms
  • on the beam

    • informal On the right track.

      • ‘By and large, SRI's survey was right on the beam.’
      • ‘Neil Patel's set makes the most of the small Playwrights Horizons stage, Kaye Voyce's costumes look suitably lived in, and Frances Aronson's lighting is on the beam.’
      • ‘We were on the beam all the way, and passed to the side of the temporary field built by Wilkinson by approximately half a mile.’
      • ‘Rather, the title was a tribute to Bhardwaj's dedication, the way she basically overcame physical and financial difficulty to stay on the beam, so to speak.’
      • ‘And when we come back we'll also have Katie on the beam.’
  • on her (or its) beam-ends

    • (of a ship) heeled over on its side; almost capsized.

      • ‘The lightship, itself, in 36 hours of gale force winds was thrown on its beam ends and shipped heavy seas notwithstanding that it was running its engine.’
      • ‘Though LC has never been knocked down on her beam ends, it still could occur under the right conditions.’
      • ‘The ship was standing on its beam ends with a 13 second period.’
      • ‘On the way to the shore a sea struck the lifeboat broadside and pitched it on its beam ends.’
      • ‘As I was making the dogleg at Raft Island, a quick jibe and a gust put my unballasted craft on its beam ends.’
      • ‘At daylight, the vessel was located on her beam ends, lying on her side where she had drifted.’
      • ‘The ship then came broadside to, and each sea struck her on the side and threw her down on her beam ends.’
      • ‘The strongest gusts exposed weaknesses in crews’ teamwork, and more than one yacht was laid on its beam ends, capsized, with crews wondering if and when the keel would restore balance.’
      • ‘All hands feverishly shoveled coal while the ship lay over almost on her beam ends, with her keel showing when she rolled.’
      • ‘The vessel went over on her beam ends at 9 o'clock Monday morning, and eleven men were washed overboard and lost.’
      • ‘She was struck by a heavy sea, thrown on her beam ends or rolled over, and finally righted with the loss of both masts.’
      • ‘At 6 p.m. the Gneisenau heeled over very suddenly, showing the men gathered on her decks and then walking on her side as she lay for a minute on her beam ends before sinking.’
      • ‘Next day the vessel was discovered in a creek at Ulbster on her beam ends with the sea washing over her.’
      • ‘This kayak wants to go straight, and fast turns should be negotiated on its beam ends.’
      • ‘When I was about 10 days old, the ship encountered a hurricane and was thrown on its beam ends and set so low that the seas came in through the cabin skylights, completely flooding the cabins.’
      • ‘Anchoring in Delaware Bay on 10 April 1801, the ship was caught in winds and an ebb tide which laid her over on her beam ends to ground, thereby occasioning need for extensive repair and refitting.’
      • ‘The ship was taken aback and thrown on her beam ends, in which situation she remained two hours.’
      • ‘This manoeuvre caused the jib sails to be blown out and with a lurch she went on her beam ends again with the main and mizzen yards under water.’
      • ‘Then, as salvagers watched, the Dows reared on its beam ends, dipped its bow into the seas, and slid to the bottom.’
      • ‘It is important to check the bolts and the fittings on the stove and oven to make certain that even in a knockdown, with the boat lying for a moment on its beam ends, it will remain securely in place.’

Origin

Old English bēam tree, beam; related to Dutch boom and German Baum.

Pronunciation:

beam

/bēm/