Definition of battalion in English:

battalion

noun

  • 1A large body of troops ready for battle, especially an infantry unit forming part of a brigade typically commanded by a lieutenant colonel.

    • ‘Later he commanded a tank battalion, an armored brigade and the First Cavalry Division.’
    • ‘From the beginning of the attack, troops of both battalions had displayed a disinclination to engage the enemy.’
    • ‘National Guard infantry battalions have been integrated into combat operations throughout the theater.’
    • ‘Only one of these battalions, the 36th battalion of the Civil Defence Corps, has been in action.’
    • ‘Hoon's plan to cut British army infantry battalions from 40 to 36 was announced on Thursday.’
    • ‘It will detail which four infantry battalions will be cut.’
    • ‘The force now included around a battalion of infantry as well as a squadron of military engineers.’
    • ‘General Van Fleet did however command an infantry battalion during this period.’
    • ‘These included infantry battalions, land combat support units, the Special Air Service and aircrew personnel.’
    • ‘A brigade normally consists of about 3,000 to 4,000 troops probably including two to three infantry battalions.’
    • ‘I'm sure that is an apt description of the reaction of the troops in those battalions.’
    • ‘When needed, the marines gather together enough battalions and brigades to form a division and that's that.’
    • ‘Throughout World War II, infantry battalions did not even have battalion scouts.’
    • ‘Instead, there is the current system of battalions assigned to brigades.’
    • ‘He has held key staff positions with troops at the battalion, brigade and division levels.’
    • ‘Posted to the Far East, he became medical officer of an infantry battalion.’
    • ‘Donovan had won a Medal of Honor during World War I as an infantry battalion commander.’
    • ‘The smallest unit of the battalion is a tactical loudspeaker broadcast team.’
    • ‘This was different from its usual role of supporting a motorised infantry battalion.’
    • ‘Tank battalions, which supported infantry divisions, were at times broken up and spread over a whole division.’
    unit, regiment, brigade, force, garrison, division, squadron, squad, company, section, detachment, contingent, legion, corps, troop, group
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    1. 1.1 A large, organized group of people pursuing a common aim or sharing a major undertaking.
      • ‘Legislation was introduced to control prices, and exports, to requisition cereals, and to organize labour battalions to work the land.’
      • ‘A battalion of certified financial planners is in the making in the country’
      • ‘It will keep a battalion of civil service economists and statisticians in work with the creation of more monitoring and evaluation.’
      • ‘The corporations always have a battalion of crackerjack lawyers to defend themselves.’
      • ‘India's specialized technology institutes are turning out battalions of software wizards.’
      • ‘It has, however, successfully filled a gap produced by the collapse of the big battalions of the international secular Left.’
      • ‘Suddenly, whole battalions of people with weird, rat-like faces were able to partake in a pastime previously denied them.’
      • ‘Weinstein is expected to enlist the usual battalions of experts on forensic science, jury selection and criminal psychology.’
      crowd, army, mob, throng, horde, swarm, multitude, herd, host, mass, drove, large number
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Origin

Late 16th century: from French bataillon, from Italian battaglione, from battaglia battle from Latin (see battle).

Pronunciation:

battalion

/bəˈtalyən/