Definition of barogram in US English:

barogram

noun

  • A record of atmospheric pressure produced by a barograph.

    • ‘This program permits the display of barograms, speedograms and variograms as well as polar curves.’
    • ‘Figure 17, below, is a barogram for Salem that covers a 72-hour span during the November 1981 storms.’
    • ‘One takes suitable glide-path sections from one or more barograms to provide the necessary polar-curve co-ordinates.’
    • ‘The barogram of the 29th was remarkable for its waviform trace, and it may be that the air-waves propagated by such a disturbance can be transmitted a very considerable distance.’
    • ‘With the amazing GPS driven technologies every flight completed can be re-lived and for those that may be interested I have a complete set of logs, barograms and statistics from each leg.’
    • ‘If the GPS also records altitude then no need for the barogram.’
    • ‘You can change the scale of the barogram by changing the setting in the combo box in the top right corner.’
    • ‘The barogram is evaluated by comparison with a calibration curve that must not be more than one year old.’
    • ‘The latter was calculated from the seismograms of the same observatory, as well as from the barograms of Siberian and European meteorological stations, see Ref. 10.’
    • ‘Flight recorders are the future, there will come the day when photos and barograms are no longer accepted by the FAI or SSA.’
    • ‘‘Barogram.exe’ is a program to display barograms and the ENL traces of your flights.’
    • ‘Short, dispersive wave trains were also typical for barograms and seismograms from atmospheric nuclear explosions, well documented in the literature.’
    • ‘A barogram can only be read to within 10 metres and then only with the help of a magnifying glass.’
    • ‘The instruments at the Kew, Observatory confirm those at Greenwich, and if further confirmation were required it can be had from the barograms at many other places in England.’

Pronunciation

barogram

/ˈbɛrəˌɡræm//ˈberəˌɡram/