Main definitions of band in English

: band1band2

band1

noun

  • 1A flat, thin strip or loop of material put around something, typically to hold it together or to decorate it.

    ‘wads of banknotes fastened with gummed paper bands’
    • ‘There was an endemic at the school, and for a while all the girls were going in with their hair up in bands.’
    • ‘Regal red and gold robes hung from his large frame, and his fiery hair almost covered the thin band of a golden crown surrounding his head.’
    • ‘Dizzying balconies hang from its upper floors, and the tower is exquisitely carved with decorative bands and inscriptions from the Koran.’
    • ‘Thoroughly wash and rinse the glass jars, lids, the rubber rings and metal bands that secure the lids; add some bleach to the wash water to disinfect.’
    • ‘Shrugging, I retrieved it from her, fastening the dark band of material around my head.’
    • ‘YogaBand uses resistance bands that are flat, four to six inches wide, without handles and approximately five to six feet long.’
    • ‘The bands - flat and wide or thin and round, with varying degrees of resistance - can be knotted and looped around furniture.’
    • ‘When I looked closer, I could see that the thin bands were fused in the middle.’
    • ‘I asked him, shifting in my seat uncomfortably before playing with the paper band on my wrist.’
    • ‘Looking at the side of the fan reveals a thin band of conductive material encircling the fan surround and connecting to the power cord.’
    • ‘The decorative band of stonework around the hall has been restored and one of the final jobs will be the installation of a new flagpole on the balcony at the front of the building.’
    • ‘The bands come in thin, large and jumbo elastics to handle the finest strands to thick hair.’
    • ‘She slipped thin bands of stretchy brown material onto Brenna's braids.’
    • ‘Round Syal's wrist is a thin band, a gaga, that represents a Diwali prayer.’
    • ‘Wayne pointed the thin black band on his wrist at the wall.’
    • ‘Only a thin band wrapping around the back of my head, roughly at ear level, glows yellow.’
    • ‘Around my forehead was a thin blood red band of velvet material.’
    • ‘All that I had to do was ask the other girls to tie a little band around it then loop it around.’
    • ‘He looked around and saw what he was looking for, a band of thin electrical wire.’
    • ‘Tobacco products for sale in duty-free shops will be sold only with a ‘for duty free only’ stamp rather than with special paper bands.’
    belt, sash, girdle, strap, tape, ring, hoop, loop, circlet, circle, cord, tie, string, thong, ribbon, fillet, strip
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A plain ring for the finger, especially a gold wedding ring.
      ‘a narrow band of gold was her only jewelry’
      • ‘A band of gold seals the wedding vows, and fifty years later the metal valorizes the most exalted anniversary of married bliss.’
      • ‘I know I am losing weight because my wedding ring and bands are very loose - so much so they are starting to bug me.’
      • ‘Angela looked over at Jacob and noticed the gold band on his finger.’
      • ‘He seemed strong, but before he could hide it, Aspen saw the gold band encircling his ring finger.’
      • ‘She wore no jewelry save the band of white gold on one of her fingers, a ring that once belonged to her mother.’
      • ‘I caught a glimpse of an enormous diamond on a band of gold and my stomach dropped.’
      • ‘He held up his left hand, which held a gold band on his left finger.’
      • ‘The other was small, dainty and was little more than a band of gold with a ruby set in the front of it.’
      • ‘He hoped she saw the gold band on his left ring finger as he felt her gaze on him.’
      • ‘After the vows are said, the Orthodox groom places a plain gold band on the ring finger of his bride's right hand.’
      • ‘He slid the solid band of gold onto her finger, and then slipped her engagement ring back on her.’
      • ‘Mr. Reubens twisted the simple band of gold once, twice, three times to the right upon his left fourth finger.’
      • ‘He exhaled a sigh of contentment as he glanced at the gold band that encompassed the ring finger of his left hand.’
      • ‘Sure enough, there on her ring finger was a gold band with a modest diamond mounted in the center.’
      • ‘So I've got little white patches, a white stripe across my wrist where the bracelet goes, and a white band around my wedding finger.’
      • ‘He twirled the gold band, Helen's wedding ring, around on the tip of his little finger, before sliding it down to the knuckle.’
      • ‘A fat, hot, salty tear rolled slowly down her pale, colour ridden cheek as she played with the plain gold band upon her finger.’
      • ‘The one approaching her was about nineteen or twenty, and she also had a gold band on her ring finger.’
      • ‘She bought the gold and diamond band as an engagement ring for Hirsch, and planned to present it to him over a picnic lunch at the beach.’
      • ‘What do we expect when we slip that band of gold on our finger?’
    2. 1.2North American Ornithology
      A ring of metal placed around a bird's leg to identify it.
      • ‘We placed a metal band on one leg of each bird and a unique pair of colored bands on the other.’
      • ‘Adult birds were caught in mist nets and marked with a unique combination of three colored leg bands and a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service band.’
      • ‘Males also were banded with a unique combination of three colored plastic leg bands (total of four bands, two per leg).’
      • ‘They were fitted with metal leg bands before release.’
      • ‘Nestlings were initially given only metal bands and were banded with color rings if they then remained in the study population.’
      • ‘The numbers on the metal bands allowed us to identify individuals from distances up to 40 m.’
      • ‘To get an idea of what's going on in the bird world, it's not necessary to slap a band on every bird's leg, he said.’
      • ‘Before eggs were laid, we trapped adults in their nest boxes and banded them with aluminum Canadian Wildlife Service bands and colored plastic leg bands.’
      • ‘All trapped birds were given a unique combination of colored plastic leg bands that identified the year, site, and individual bird.’
      • ‘All birds were banded with numbered aluminum leg bands and identified by sex and age (if possible).’
      • ‘Each was banded with a U.S. Fish and Wildlife aluminum band and three colored leg bands in unique combinations.’
      • ‘Upon capture, each male received a unique set of two colored plastic bands to allow individual identification during dominance trials.’
      • ‘We marked all birds with uniquely colored leg bands to permit individual identification.’
      • ‘Some plastic band loss occurred, and we treated birds with partial plastic bands as being of unknown identity when recaptured.’
      • ‘They were given permanent metal colored bands on the last nest-visit when the A nestling was 32 days old.’
      • ‘Now, researchers are using stronger bands to track birds like these long-lived albatross.’
      • ‘All the birds in clinic have bands on their legs so when they are taken out of a flight room you can tell them apart.’
      • ‘Upon capture, birds were fitted with individually colored plastic leg bands and immediately released at their point of capture.’
      • ‘The first record of a metal band being attached to a bird's leg was in 1595.’
      • ‘Without even looking at their leg bands, we can tell which birds belong to which family, simply by listening to their sounds.’
    3. 1.3A collar with two hanging strips, worn by certain clerics and academics as part of their formal dress.
      • ‘As the Revolution developed, he became "a zealous Whig" who served in the Continental Congress, the only member who wore clerical bands in 1776.’
      • ‘The early colonists named it the “Parson bird,” in allusion to the peculiar tufts of white feathers that adorn its throat, and their fancied resemblance to the clerical bands.’
      • ‘There was a great accumulation of them near his clerical bands, on which the abundant folds of his red skin were resting.’
    4. 1.4Mechanics
      A belt connecting wheels or pulleys.
      • ‘You can try to raise the cylinders higher in the cylinder-twinning bands, which will bring the valves higher up, making access easier.’
      • ‘Spool the band around the axle, place the racer on the floor and get ready for a speedy trip when you release the rear wheels.’
      • ‘Start with a pulley or elastic resistance band set at shoulder height.’
      • ‘Much admired for his skill at carpentry, Tade made horses and donkeys carts and put bands on the wheels of carts.’
      • ‘In the early years the wheels had iron bands, so it was a fairly jolty ride to school.’
  • 2A stripe or elongated area of a different color, texture, or composition than its surroundings.

    ‘a long, narrow band of cloud’
    • ‘Thick fibrous bands were noted dividing lymph nodes into nodules of varied size.’
    • ‘He was wearing a dark top with a horizontal band across it.’
    • ‘The walls were divided into three horizontal bands, each running the full length of the room and half its width.’
    • ‘The courthouse is divided into three parallel bands or zones that extend down its long axis.’
    • ‘Farmers grow their crops across a thin band of land in the southernmost part of the country.’
    • ‘He was wearing a dark woolly hat and a black top with a white band across the chest.’
    • ‘In usual Smart style, a contrasting band of colour surrounds the side doors.’
    • ‘Juveniles have colored bands above the pectoral fins that change to a spot when the fish mature.’
    • ‘The main entrance to the complex is on St Andrew Square, set within a vertical band of glazed curtain walling that runs the full height of the building.’
    • ‘Using arrangements of thin intersecting bands he found he could create the illusion of a third or fourth colour.’
    • ‘The space is meticulously defined - divided into four horizontal bands; held taut by the emphatic vertical of a single cypress tree.’
    • ‘They are also aided in avoiding detection by dark bands and patches of dorsal color which act as a form of camouflage when the fish is viewed from above, especially by birds.’
    • ‘On a notable day in July the cub was snoozing with his sisters within the band of trees, ears alert for danger signals.’
    • ‘In fact, this band right you can see right along the Rio River, that's dumping about two to three inches of rain per hour.’
    • ‘These are used by the two players to move the ball back and forth on the pitch, which is divided into 5 metre bands.’
    • ‘Like all gobies it has two distinct dorsal fins, and a distinguishing feature of this species is that the front fin has a pale band at its top.’
    • ‘These bands were separated by thin lines of much paler paint.’
    • ‘The cloud bands move at different speeds, and their irregularities may be due to either the different motions between them or to disturbances below the visible cloud layer.’
    • ‘The blue line intersecting the orange band of the 401 in the lower left indicates the ravine and the site of the crash.’
    • ‘They were a soft light blue, with intense dark lines reaching to the outer rims and aqua bands around her pupils.’
    stripe, strip, streak, line, bar, belt, swathe, vein, thread, flash
    View synonyms
  • 3A range of frequencies or wavelengths in a spectrum (especially of radio frequencies)

    ‘channels in the UHF band’
    • ‘The software subsequently generates RMS wavefront data for these frequency bands.’
    • ‘Quantum dots can be designed to fluoresce in a wide range of wavelength bands.’
    • ‘The wireless technology can transmit digital data over a wide spectrum of frequency bands with very low power.’
    • ‘All the sub-streams are transmitted in the same frequency band, so spectrum is used very efficiently.’
    • ‘The portrait of a galaxy could thus include information about its appearance in these other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum.’
    • ‘The spectrum of B. maxima, with its pronounced 470 nm band, resembled the excitation spectra for the emission bands from PS II.’
    • ‘Still, to be truly useful, devices should operate at telecom wavelengths or across broader spectral bands.’
    • ‘An image is decomposed into a collection of sub-sampled spatial frequency bands, known as subbands.’
    • ‘Multiple images of a single field-of-view are captured in more than three wavelength bands in this range.’
    • ‘Short and long refer to the short and long wavelength bands, respectively.’
    • ‘Numerous manufacturers offer products that meet these requirements in one or more frequency bands.’
    • ‘Today's multiband antennas are physically too large to carry if they have to support a very wide range of frequency bands.’
    • ‘Possible applications may range from spectroscopy to wavelength generation in bands not easily accessible at present.’
    • ‘In the visible, three spectral bands corresponding to blood absorption can be indicated.’
    • ‘The new images show Titan's atmosphere and surface at various near-infrared spectral bands.’
    • ‘UV-B is the band of lowest wavelength and highest energy that penetrates the ozone layer of the stratosphere.’
    • ‘Crowded spectrum bands are the biggest problem.’
    • ‘The input light comprises a plurality of wavelength bands or optical channels of light, each of which are centered at a respective channel wavelength.’
    • ‘Commercial adoption is expected to accelerate after this summer, when new standards will be introduced to regulate radio frequency bands.’
    • ‘Many applications need fast readout, high-precision synchronization, and high sensitivity in defined spectral bands.’
  • 4archaic A thing that restrains, binds, or unites.

    • ‘Her powers swelled, thrashed, fighting the bands of black that imprisoned them, nowhere near as invincible as the Psirons had been.’
    • ‘In this context, the insistence we noted earlier on cutting the restraining bands upon the hands and feet of the deceased before interment has a clear significance.’
    • ‘However, at some point before the funeral, as we were informed, these restraining bands are always removed.’
    • ‘I walked to the library slowly, as if shambling, for my heart is bound with iron bands like the faithful servant in that old tale.’
    • ‘He comes out bound with bands and a cloth over his head.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Surround (an object) with something in the form of a strip or ring, typically for reinforcement or decoration.

    ‘doors are banded with iron to make them stronger’
    • ‘Across from him, there was a wooden door, banded with black iron.’
    • ‘The outer edges of these Audi floor mats are coil-stitched and are not banded to provide endurance.’
    1. 1.1North American Ornithology
      Put a band on (a bird) for identification.
      • ‘UK ornithologists are able to keep track of these aged avians because the birds are banded, or in British vernacular, ringed.’
      • ‘In 16 adjacent territories, where nearly all birds were banded, 34 birds disappeared during 8 years.’
      • ‘However, after previously unbanded birds were banded during nesting, the understanding of territory boundaries and number of territories never changed.’
      • ‘If a bird was banded as a nestling, its age was known.’
      • ‘The first bird that I saw banded was a calliope hummingbird.’
      • ‘All birds were banded with a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service aluminum band, and all adults were marked with unique combinations of colored leg bands for individual identification.’
      • ‘When 14 days old, nestlings were banded and weighed to the nearest 0.05 g.’
      • ‘Most birds are color banded for individual identification, and blood samples have been collected for all banded birds since 1990.’
      • ‘Each bird was uniquely banded with a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service numbered band and three anodized aluminum color bands.’
      • ‘We also present data from several 1-year-old birds banded as nestlings and recaptured the following breeding season.’
      • ‘Another possibility is that the bird had a genetic problem with its heart and it had heart failure from the stress of being banded.’
      • ‘Sex of hatching-year birds and age of adults could not be determined, except when birds that had been banded as nestlings or juveniles later returned to the study area as adults.’
      • ‘Birds did not switch far from their original territory, and most territorial birds were banded in the vicinity of the removal experiments.’
      • ‘For birds that were banded after arrival, we assumed that they had arrived and begun fasting on Oct 20 for males and Oct 25 for females.’
      • ‘Nestlings were initially given only metal bands and were banded with color rings if they then remained in the study population.’
      • ‘Nearly all of these birds were banded as chicks or juveniles at or near breeding colonies.’
      • ‘Only after the ornithologists began banding birds on a large scale did their migration patterns begin to come into focus.’
      • ‘Birds were banded with U. S. Fish and Wildlife bands and a unique combination of color bands, which allowed me to identify individuals at a distance.’
      • ‘All nestlings were banded, which enabled a study of recruitment to the breeding population.’
      • ‘Breeding Black Brant have been banded at that site since 1986, providing a large sample of identifiable females on which to measure repeatability.’
  • 2Mark (something) with a stripe or stripes of a different color.

    ‘the bird's bill is banded across the middle with black’
    ‘banded agate’
    • ‘The legs are banded in cream and maroon, the spines on top of the body are orange at the base and green at the tip, and the general effect is like that of a delicately coloured butterfly.’
    • ‘The collection today has eight vases executed by the Baroviers in calcedonio glass, which imitates chalcedony, banded agate, and other semiprecious stones.’
    • ‘Subtly impressive was the beautifully banded agate Mughal fly whisk handle, tipped with a garnet on an amber collar and inset with emeralds.’
    • ‘The CD also contains a photo gallery of 54 ornamental fishes, especially the attractive and colourful varieties like Scarlet banded barb and Rosy barb.’
    • ‘These are delicate, feathery to fuzzy-looking fingers and differ from the more stalactitic and concentrically banded forms that probably result from a different process.’

Origin

Late Old English ( band), from Old Norse, reinforced in late Middle English by Old French bande, of Germanic origin; related to bind.

Pronunciation:

band

/band/

Main definitions of band in English

: band1band2

band2

noun

  • 1A group of people who have a common interest or purpose.

    ‘guerrilla bands’
    ‘a determined band of activists’
    • ‘After Napoleon lost finally at Waterloo, his army disintegrated into bands of brigands who raised Hell for a long time.’
    • ‘The bands of excited children who walked behind local militiamen heading to battle in the fall now clamor around machinery laying down new water pipes.’
    • ‘Even worse, it wasn't unheard of for foreign expatriates or discharged soldiers to form bands of brigands that terrorized lonely travelers.’
    • ‘After independence, the bands of the army and the police used to perform for the public on Sunday evenings but this practice was discontinued.’
    • ‘A small wood nestling in a Pennine valley has won a top award for a band of tree-planting volunteers.’
    • ‘The hoodlums are smart but not too smart, and the movie sets up a pretty fair match of wits and gun-power among the various bands of ne'er-do-wells.’
    • ‘The whole of the Sikh army had been divided into bands, which were headed by a leader who was known as Jathedar.’
    • ‘The administration of bulk supplies also is much easier than if small bands of fighters were dispatched to loot and acquire local produce and livestock.’
    • ‘But she adds that every time she tries to sell her house, prospective buyers are scared away by the bands of drug dealers circulating out front.’
    • ‘The band was finally forced to surrender only 30 miles short of reaching safety in Canada.’
    • ‘Finally, why haven't the police gone after some of these small bands of ‘anarchists’?’
    • ‘He threw his 800 men head-on against a position meticulously prepared by the three bands of Seminoles waiting there.’
    • ‘Among the gathering crowd, roving bands of reporters snatch interviews and roll tape in an effort to capsulize the purpose of the ride for a future sound byte.’
    • ‘All three armed services sent detachments, bands and chiefs of staff, who were accompanied by police and relatives.’
    • ‘The band was divided into ten small groups, each covering a certain area of the city.’
    • ‘His plans had required a dexterity that would serve him well when he came to supervise his own band of postgraduates later.’
    • ‘In March, army forces put down simultaneous uprisings by small bands of fighters in the capital, in what appeared to be either a failed coup or a mutiny.’
    • ‘In one strange variant, a princess at home alone beheads each one of a band of robbers as they creep in through a hole in the wall, but the robber chief escapes with only a head wound.’
    group, gang, mob, pack, troop, troupe, company, party, bevy, crew, body, working party, posse
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Anthropology
      A subgroup of a tribe.
      • ‘All Inuit bands speak very closely related dialects of this language family.’
      • ‘Some live in thriving communities, while others are just small tribes or bands.’
      • ‘Social mechanisms like marriage and exogamy ensured that individual bands, tribes, or clans operated within systems that extended over vast distances.’
      • ‘Tribes are larger than bands, numbering up to a few thousand people, and they tend to be settled farmers, though some are pastoralists with a mobile economy.’
    2. 1.2(in Canada) a First Nations community that is officially recognized by the federal government, having an elected government with authority over internal affairs and acknowledged rights to a tract of land.
      ‘the legislation requires aboriginal communities to post their band's financial statements online’
      [as modifier] ‘band members have an aboriginal right to fish in the river’
  • 2A small group of musicians and vocalists who play pop, jazz, or rock music.

    ‘the band's last two albums’
    ‘a local band’
    • ‘Their female vocalist also allows the band to stand out in a genre full of male singers.’
    • ‘Aside from piano and saxophone, she took up cello and mallet percussion and hung out in high school jazz bands.’
    • ‘In her spare time she performs as one of three vocalists in a band.’
    • ‘Over the course of the last decade they have established themselves as one of the best live bands in the country.’
    • ‘With numerous female-led bands making waves in rock music, this album is a poor representation of what women can do.’
    • ‘Not that I wanted them to sound like a jazz band, but I wanted them to keep pretty good tempo.’
    • ‘In a photo from 1955, she is seen onstage around the time she made her first recordings with a local band.’
    • ‘Unlike most bands on the current jazz festival circuit, the Chicago Six do not adhere to a single genre.’
    • ‘So many bands and vocalists are trapped in the covers universe.’
    • ‘I've always listened to bands with female vocalists so it was natural for me to ask some girls I knew if they wanted to sing.’
    • ‘Then five months ago, a friend introduced him to three young musicians who had joined forces to create a band and needed a vocalist.’
    • ‘Arbez spent his childhood playing trombone in a jazz band before discovering the dancefloor.’
    • ‘It also features the band giving commentary on the videos.’
    • ‘Just because she had an audition, didn't mean she would continue on to be in the band as a vocalist.’
    • ‘I moved my body in synch with the early 90's music, assuming the role of the band's vocalist with zest.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the band are touring Britain on a heavy promotional tour.’
    • ‘The event, which includes live bands and a jazz combo playing on the streets plus many stalls, is again being organised by Calne Rotary Club.’
    • ‘Now the only thing missing from the band is a vocalist, a drummer and a synth player.’
    • ‘The band's subtly supportive rhythm section is a strong element that buoys each of their numbers.’
    • ‘Nowadays, you have a lot of bands claiming to be punk rock that are really more mainstream than punk.’
    pop group, ensemble, orchestra
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1A group of musicians who play brass, wind, or percussion instruments.
      ‘a military band’
      • ‘Now Wanderers are going a step further with their own Reebok Rhythm sound, based on a percussion band from Ghana.’
      • ‘The Catholic Boys Brigade in Newry was over 1,000 strong, and they had three bands, - brass, flute and bugle.’
      • ‘They have already lost the two leading musical instruments in the band.’
      • ‘Were any particular bands or musicians discussed?’
      • ‘Appropriately, the band features a fabulous fat tuba player spitting out bass notes.’
      • ‘Then with the early light came ‘the clash of brass’ as the band of the Royal Marines marched by.’
      • ‘Steel drum music originated when members of traditional African percussion bands began using discarded oil drums.’
      • ‘Before that, he was a musician touring with various bands.’
      • ‘Sibelius Instruments is a unique, interactive encyclopedia of instruments, bands, orchestras and ensembles.’
      • ‘In New Orleans and across the country brass marching bands became very popular in the Napoleonic period.’
      • ‘Sceptical as I was at the start, playing in a percussion band was also good fun.’
      • ‘Even from the opening moments, as the band tunes up its instruments, we know this movie is going to be about the music.’
      • ‘The band collaborates with new musicians every time it performs.’
      • ‘Whether they are Pipes & Drums or Brass & Reed bands, the musicians are there to support this grand event.’
      • ‘Four members of the present band also play with the Graig Brass Band, a band with a long history stretching back to the 1760s.’
      • ‘Craig's dad, Ian, is a trombonist, while his brother, Andrew, is in the band's percussion session.’
      • ‘As this is going on, the angry men are desperately trying to play a full set of marching band wind instruments.’
      • ‘Throughout the morning, youngsters from the various bands, including brass and wind, practised in front of the many visitors.’
      • ‘In the same year, he went from being a rehearsal keyboard player to a studio musician with the band.’
    2. 2.2informal An orchestra.
      • ‘Then, for the last three years Power Stars Steel Orchestra won the medium band category playing his Panorama songs.’
      • ‘His early education was in the preparatory schools of Bob Jones University, where he was active in the bands and orchestras.’
      • ‘Much of the focus is on getting the town's children involved and primary schools, high schools, youth groups, bands and orchestras will be contacted over the coming weeks.’
      • ‘The show was backed by a world-class band and a string quartet.’
      • ‘Not every council provides music tuition like us as it is a non-statutory provision, but we realise its worth, especially our orchestras and bands.’
      • ‘Mr Dow, who lives in Stockport, was also assistant director of music at the Caterham School in Surrey and has experience in conducting bands, choirs and orchestras.’
      • ‘Many visiting bands and orchestras from England played in Tooreen.’
      • ‘The bands and orchestras split into small groups to perform different pieces throughout the night.’
      • ‘Largely self-taught, his early life was spent as a local musician, conducting bands and choirs and teaching the violin.’
      • ‘And the first time they were backed by a live band, led by musical director Johan Laas.’
      • ‘He began earning his living in theatre orchestras and hotel bands, before Thomas Beecham made him leader of his Beecham Orchestra in 1908, and a solo career beckoned.’
      • ‘It's targeted at youngsters who own their own instruments but don't normally get the chance to play as part of a band or orchestra.’
      • ‘By the time the class got to the music hall, there were already bands and orchestras playing.’
      • ‘At a distance, in the Games Village park, a live orchestra band played on.’
      • ‘The concert involves all the school's orchestras and bands as well as dancers.’
      • ‘This year, her teacher placed her in the first chair position in both band and orchestra.’
      • ‘Students may pursue individual musical study and may take part in a wide range of bands, orchestras, dramatic performances and musicals.’
      • ‘Community Development Minister Gene Zwozdesky has said he wants everyone from church choirs and school bands to symphony orchestras to be able to perform it.’
      • ‘Aidan is also a member of the Mayo Concert Orchestra, and probably the most experienced musician in the band.’
      • ‘Yet all the people on stage at Nottingham's Royal Concert Hall - band and orchestra alike - were clearly having a ball.’
  • 3North American A herd or flock.

    ‘moving bands of caribou’
    • ‘That is when they pounce, like a band of hyenas after the lions have left the kill.’
    • ‘Relieved of the need to avoid predators, little bands of animals have not another single thing in their heads.’
    • ‘The herds and bands of elephants, horses, dancing girls and musicians, and scenes from the Ramayana come alive on the outer walls of the temple.’
    • ‘Through binoculars we saw great bands of caribou in the foothills to the south and east.’
    • ‘However, when locust population density is high, they form into gregariously behaving bands of nymphs or swarms of adults.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • (of people or organizations) form a group for a mutual purpose.

    ‘local people banded together to fight the company’
    • ‘Sixteen of the coating industry's leading companies have banded together under the TEAM UV banner to produce a racecar coated with the latest paint and coatings technology.’
    • ‘Europe, North America, and Japan banded together as expected, while China effectively joined the developing nations.’
    • ‘Throughout the industrialised world, people have banded together in organised groups to protect the rights of children on issues like child labour, health, and education.’
    • ‘This prompted the 17 business organisations who have officially banded together to pressure politicians to deal with the crime situation to issue a release condemning the move on Friday.’
    • ‘A group of leading organizations have banded together to address the problem of minority underrepresentation in business and management education.’
    • ‘The Northern and Southern Empires banded together and combined their armies to go defeat the new threat to everyone's life.’
    • ‘Unifying under a general label, gay South Asians have banded together throughout the world, aided significantly by the Internet.’
    • ‘Amidst the bleak despair of this ignoble abdication, a few organisations bravely banded together under the banner of Citizens Initiative in Ahmedabad.’
    • ‘‘Everyone banded together on this issue and it just shows what can be done when there is a common goal, even without a government representative,’ Mr Dunne said.’
    • ‘A number of state and federal organizations have also banded together to host National Estuaries Day, meant to promote the importance of estuaries and the need to protect them.’
    • ‘We all banded together and entered the estate of the local landlord to take over the land.’
    • ‘Groups country-wide who work against dependency on alcohol, illegal drugs and tobacco have banded together to work for maintaining federal funding levels.’
    • ‘Movement organizers said they have banded together to express frustration over alleged cronyism and a lack of ‘decency’ in Estrada's government.’
    • ‘Local residents and other concerned people soon banded together in loosely organised protest and called themselves Friends of Hindmarsh Island.’
    • ‘They have banded together in the hope of organising a non-partisan ‘people's campaign’ in favour of the vaccination approach.’
    • ‘Forty states have banded together to organize the Streamlined Sales Tax Project, which has been holding meetings this fall to address issues that vex multistate companies.’
    • ‘A few NGOs and the Integrated Tribal Development Authority have banded together to help them.’
    • ‘There are relatively few men in the nursing profession, so many of them have banded together and created an organization to assist them in their careers.’
    • ‘Charity organizations have banded together to introduce creative campaigns which improve the living standards of the poor in Thai society.’
    • ‘Householders in one street Avebury Road have banded together to fight yobbish behaviour, organising events like street parties to strengthen community spirit.’
    team up, join forces, pool resources, club together, get together, come together
    collaborate, cooperate, work together, pull together
    amalgamate, unite, form an alliance, form an association, combine, merge, affiliate, federate
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French bande, of Germanic origin; related to banner.

Pronunciation:

band

/band/