Definition of badger in English:

badger

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Repeatedly ask (someone) to do something; pester.

    ‘Tom had finally badgered her into going’
    ‘journalists badgered him about the deals’
    with object and infinitive ‘his daughter was always badgering him to let her join’
    • ‘There is no mind-jarring pop music to shred your thoughts and, more importantly, no irksome rash of timeshare touts badgering you to buy a dream in the sun.’
    • ‘Dad's been badgering me to get a webcam for ages - since I arrived in Japan, actually - so we could videoconference with each other.’
    • ‘He says he was only cajoled into being a public figure by his wife and son badgering him to avoid the silent comforts of the library.’
    • ‘You can almost see the foam dripping from their mouths as they behave like lawyers badgering a witness.’
    • ‘This is merely badgering the witness and editorialising, so you know, Senator, on both grounds your propositions are out of order.’
    • ‘Not long after Thompson scored, O'Neill started badgering his team from the sideline, a process that never really relented until the end.’
    • ‘How many nine-year-olds can be bothered to empathise with the serving staff in the local mall, when their time could be much more profitably filled by badgering their parents for junk food?’
    • ‘Above all, though, I've constantly badgered my husband, friends and colleagues asking: ‘What's the time?’’
    • ‘Is the News of the World suggesting that the BBC should have released his name sooner so that other journalists could start badgering him earlier over the affair?’
    • ‘On the night of the shooting, Jaw had been badgering her about her past relationships and insisted on seeing copies of recent e-mails.’
    • ‘When a grade six friend wrote an essay about the computer work his brother was doing down the road at the University of Waterloo, Stumpf badgered the friend's brother into taking him along to the university.’
    • ‘My guess is, that clerk didn't feel stupid about it at all, until the Times reporter started badgering him.’
    • ‘The friend that's always badgering you about why you're upset, the brother that wants an account of every boy his sister hangs out with.’
    • ‘He hated his mother for physically and mentally badgering him to fulfil her wishes.’
    • ‘Every Friday, the Boy tried to start his homework right when he got back, since the Twin always badgered him to, but it never worked.’
    • ‘But I have, for a long time, called him Badger, for his propensity of badgering and harassing young women with whom he fancies himself in love.’
    • ‘A great idea, except it doesn't really matter, because nobody minds if you betray them or not - next time, they'll still be badgering you for help.’
    • ‘To those press people and television reporters badgering me, it was easy for them to talk about George in the past tense even as he lay on a hospital bed.’
    • ‘He's been badgering us for about five minutes now with his wretched droning, and if I'm exposed to much more of it I'm going to bite someone.’
    • ‘My husband had been badgering me for months to tie up some savings in the bonds.’
    pester, harass, bother, plague, torment, hound, nag, chivvy, harry, keep on at, go on at, harp on at, keep after, importune, annoy, trouble
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Origin

Early 16th century: perhaps from badge, with reference to its distinctive head markings. The verb sense (late 18th century) originates from the sport of badger baiting.

Pronunciation

badger

/ˈbædʒər//ˈbajər/