Definition of backboard in English:

backboard

noun

  • 1A board placed at or forming the back of something, such as a collage or piece of electronic equipment.

    • ‘‘Just as I thought,’ he scoffed, tossing me like a rag doll against the backboard of my bed.’
    • ‘As with all two-part furniture, check overall for compatibility of quality, timber and backboards.’
    • ‘I sat cross-legged, leaning up against the backboard.’
    • ‘The top drawers are rounded on the front, as they are on others of Stahl's chests, and the backboard is exuberantly shaped to resemble breaking waves, typical of Soap Hollow chests.’
    • ‘I nailed tour boards together as a frame with the backboard a few inches higher than the front, laid the storm windows on top and grew some delicious early spring and late fall salad greens for myself.’
    • ‘These include about two dozen index features, such as base construction and the method of attaching backboards and drawer runners, in addition to idiosyncrasies of design and decoration.’
    • ‘The backboard too is lacquer, ornamented with graceful figures in garden pavilions (Pl. VIIIa).’
    • ‘Ranged along in front of the backboard is a group of musicians whose instruments include a flute, a shoulder drum, a hip drum and sometimes a stick drum.’
    • ‘Elanor leaned against the backboard of her bed, and stared at her as she had when she was a child, trying to find something of hers in the strange woman's face.’
    • ‘The side chairs were coated in a blood-thick lacquer - thrones, with strange symbols carved into the backboard.’
    • ‘Michael leered closer, pressing him against the backboard.’
    • ‘Starting at the top of the Salem high chest, the builder extended the backboards to cover the opening at the rear of the case, so it is not possible to see a wall through the two round apertures in the tyrnpanum board.’
    • ‘There is a wrought-iron ring on the top, so that it could be hung on a wall, and the backboards are held together with eighteenth-century sprigs (along with several modem screws).’
    • ‘She sighed, leaning against the backboard of her bed.’
    • ‘The bonds were rough and tight, cutting into his skin, and his movement was further restricted because the cord around his wrists had been lashed to one of the staves holding the backboard of the wagon in place.’
    1. 1.1Basketball An upright board behind the basket, off which the ball may rebound.
      • ‘Whenever he grabbed an offensive rebound, the plan was to bank the ball in using the backboard - clean and simple and strong.’
      • ‘We were anxiously awaiting him trying to pass the ball off the backboard to himself for his 10th assist.’
      • ‘The orange ball rebounded off the backboard and gave a few half-hearted bounces on the cement floor before rolling away.’
      • ‘Their chins should be up and their eyes fixed on their target, which is the spot on the square where they want to bounce the ball off the backboard.’
      • ‘So we did a simple drill where the players toss the ball off the backboard, jump high as possible to get it, then fire an outlet pass to a sideline player.’
    2. 1.2 A board used to support or straighten a person's back, especially after an accident.
      • ‘Two backboards were lashed together, and he was secured to them.’
      • ‘The man was placed on a backboard and had a neck brace applied as a precaution before he was taken to Southend Hospital.’
      • ‘One attendant placed Allyson on top of a backboard, taking care not to move her too much in case she'd broken something.’
      • ‘By then the other EMT, a woman, approached Carla with a backboard.’
      • ‘A backboard was tied to my body to keep it stable.’
      • ‘They lifted me on the backboard and then into the ambulance.’
      • ‘Briefly, subjects stood with their heel, calf, buttocks, back, and head fixed with a strap against a vertical backboard.’
      • ‘The pods had no artificial gravity fields of their own to provide inertial dampening effects, so the Marines strapped themselves securely to the vertical backboards provided.’
      • ‘As a precaution he had a neck collar attached and was placed on a backboard with blocks to immobilise his head, neck and back.’
      • ‘Once the paramedics hit the scene, things calmed down a little, although getting her onto the backboard was an excruciating process.’
      • ‘During the training, four soldiers must stabilize the patient in the water, get the patient on the backboard without injuring the spine, strap the patient in, and then swim the patient out of the pool.’
      • ‘They lifted her gently and put her on a backboard.’
      • ‘The driver was cut free, had a neck collar applied and had to be placed on a backboard.’

Pronunciation:

backboard

/ˈbakbôrd/