Definition of back door in English:

back door

noun

  • 1The door or entrance at the back of a building.

    • ‘They pushed open the back doors and entered the building, passing by the control room and up the concrete back stairs, heading for their changing rooms.’
    • ‘The robber pushed past and failed an attempt to escape through the thick glass back doors of the terrace.’
    • ‘Within minutes the back doors of the prison van burst open and the three prisoners escaped with the gunmen, one of whom was dressed in a Royal Mail uniform.’
    • ‘We will be getting new front and back doors as well as a new kitchen, a new bathroom and central heating.’
    • ‘Burglars are still carrying out daylight robberies in Putnoe and Goldington, despite police urging home owners to lock their back doors.’
    • ‘Both the front and back doors of her home are glass panelled.’
    • ‘Bob pried open one of the back doors to the building, and they all scrambled out into the cool night air.’
    • ‘Veon threw open his door and opened the back doors, grabbing his pistols and stuffing them into his belt.’
    • ‘The back doors to the complexes, which open out to a shared courtyard, are broken and can't be locked.’
    • ‘‘Sadly people can no longer leave their back doors open for the neighbours to wander in and out,’ he said.’
    • ‘Eight men armed with clubs burst into the house through both the front and back doors and set upon the occupants.’
    • ‘Its front and back doors were fortified with locks and bolts and an eight-foot piece of wood and its windows were nailed down.’
    • ‘They're a link back to the days when nobody bothered to lock their back doors and everyone grew vegetables.’
    • ‘Police immediately cordoned off the house and officers guarded the front and back doors until the examination at which it was concluded her death was not suspicious.’
    • ‘She asks him what's happening, but he doesn't reply, so she duly goes off to open the back doors while he goes off in a different direction.’
    • ‘He had fallen out of the back doors when the van was driven off.’
    • ‘She insisted on leaving the front and back doors open at all times, and these were at either end of a passageway through the house.’
    • ‘On the other side of the alley are the rears of another strip, and the back doors of all these stores empty into the alley.’
    • ‘He found nearly 100 kilograms of explosives hidden in the back seat and along the two back doors.’
    • ‘The car's back doors have been designed with longer windows, improving the outlook for rear-seat passengers.’
    1. 1.1 A feature or defect of a computer system that allows surreptitious unauthorized access to data.
      • ‘Around the same time, Mydoom.A was infecting machines around the world, leaving a small backdoor to each infected computer.’
      • ‘Eight days after the outbreak, the author used that backdoor to download personal data from computer owners.’
      • ‘It also attempts to open a backdoor on infected Windows PCs, allowing hackers to exploit compromised systems.’
      • ‘Once downloaded, the victim unwittingly activates the backdoor by compiling Sendmail from source code.’
      • ‘However the back door component of the virus has no time limit; it is still running on pox-ridden PCs.’

adjective

  • attributive (of an activity) clandestine; underhanded.

    ‘backdoor private deals’
    against the rules, contrary to the rules, out of order, improper, incorrect, illegitimate, unscrupulous, unethical, unprofessional
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

back door

/ˈˌbæk ˈdɔ(ə)r//ˈˌbak ˈdô(ə)r/