Definition of aviate in English:

aviate

verb

  • Pilot or fly in an airplane.

    [with object] ‘an aircraft that can be aviated without effort’
    [no object] ‘there are fewer opportunities to aviate in winter’
    • ‘Demand disciplined aviating and responsible decision making.’
    • ‘The first commandment of the always-germane rule: aviate, navigate, communicate.’
    • ‘I had aviated, I had navigated, I had communicated, and I had landed as soon as possible.’
    • ‘It wasn't until passing through 25 degrees nose high, with airspeed rapidly dropping, that I focused on the priority task of aviating.’
    • ‘Hundreds are flying, and cheaper aviating doesn't exist.’
    • ‘While poring over our numerous checklists, aviating, navigating and communicating, we quickly found out the latest in a series of bad news: our previously in-the-green auxiliary brakes were now in the red - not good.’
    • ‘Good crew coordination and flexibility allowed us to handle this minor emergency effectively, without becoming so wrapped up in it that we forgot to aviate.’
    • ‘Sure, the old axiom recommends aviating first, navigating second, and communicating third.’
    • ‘All aviators are taught to aviate, navigate, communicate, and to prioritize tasks.’
    • ‘The lesson being aviate first and then communicate later.’
    • ‘I was aviating fine and navigating fine and we hadn't had a chance to troubleshoot yet.’
    • ‘Since we just had arrived in theater, most of the preflight brief was focused on aviating and communicating in the confined airspace of the AOR.’
    • ‘From day one, we're told to aviate, navigate, then communicate.’
    • ‘The student did an excellent lob of aviating by climbing away from the ground without hesitation.’
    • ‘Almost flying over Farsi Island could have been avoided with better aviating and navigating.’
    • ‘My adrenaline was so pumped for mission accomplishment, that I failed to properly aviate, navigate, and communicate.’
    • ‘She quickly prioritized procedures: aviate, navigate and communicate.’
    • ‘In fact, the diverts listed during our preflight briefing proved not to be legal, but we felt with good control and calm, professional aviating, we would be able to hack it.’

Origin

Late 19th century: back-formation from aviation.

Pronunciation:

aviate

/ˈāvēˌāt/