Definition of avian in English:

avian

adjective

  • Relating to birds.

    ‘avian tuberculosis’
    • ‘The only bird or avian species we know of is the so-called humble chicken.’
    • ‘A giant flightless bird like the dodo is on the extreme end of avian evolution.’
    • ‘Within each nesting block, we tallied the number of avian nest predators observed.’
    • ‘When the animal is active on land, circulation approaches the mammalian or avian condition.’
    • ‘In Germany more than a hundred wild birds have died of avian influenza, most of them on Rügen.’
    • ‘This recent and exciting discovery is important in understanding avian origins and ancestry.’
    • ‘A site with a much broader approach to avian information is the Mangoverde World Bird Guide.’
    • ‘Ambient temperature is commonly thought to influence avian incubation behavior.’
    • ‘Detailed information on spacing behavior of avian nest predators is lacking for my study plots.’
    • ‘This applies to explanations for the evolutionary origin of avian feathers and avian flight.’
    • ‘This bird was an escapee of some manner of avian imprisonment, maybe a zoo.’
    • ‘According to friends, he enjoys making avian analogies between rare birds and his political allies and enemies.’
    • ‘The unguarded chicks and eggs are easy prey for gulls and other avian predators.’
    • ‘We could not identify avian predators to species level from egg damage.’
    • ‘We suspect that many losses after emergence were due to avian predators.’
    • ‘For more information, see our new exhibits on vertebrate flight and avian flight.’
    • ‘Vocalizations during the breeding season, such as song, are common among males of most avian taxa.’
    • ‘There are probably as many bird phylogenies as there are avian taxonomists.’
    • ‘Some parts seem to be like bird or avian viruses, while other bits are similar to bovine or murine viruses.’
    • ‘Ostrom introduced the cursorial predator hypothesis of the origin of avian flight.’

noun

  • A bird.

    • ‘Following is a complete listing of the endangered avians.’
    • ‘Over time, songbirds like the robin and other prized avians, including bald eagles and peregrine falcons, ingested enough contaminated prey that they died of DDT poisoning.’
    • ‘Fear that most of the seasonal birds had flown was unfounded, as Harlequin Ducks had been reported recently along with an array of equally enticing avians.’
    • ‘In describing warblers, as I do so lovingly, one can draw upon words like avifauna, avians, birds, songbirds, beautiful birds, and, of course, warblers.’
    • ‘Griffons were pony-sized, quadrupedal avians with such a reputation for savagery that they had been banned from all the Northern mountain provinces.’
    • ‘The kingdom of unloved avians is ruled by the trash triumvirate: House Sparrow, European Starling, and Rock Pigeon.’
    • ‘It's been known for some time that birds are descended from dinosaurs, with Archaeopteryx representing one strong link between avians and antiquity.’
    • ‘Amazing writers, naturalists, and enthusiasts from all over the world have submitted some of their favorite blog posts relating to the interaction between humans and avians and compiled them here for your reading pleasure.’
    • ‘Many avians are omnivorous and appreciate the kind of high-quality protein provided by bugs on the wing.’
    • ‘Until recently, feathers were the quintessential feature of avians, associated only with flight.’
    • ‘They say too many opportunities exist for close contact between humans and avians, making accidental infection possible.’
    • ‘A seminar at Edinburgh University's veterinary center focuses on educating people on the correct way of interacting with highly-strung avians from macaws to budgies.’
    • ‘He's not just talking about pigeons and sparrows either; kiwis, ostriches, penguins, and rare flightless parrots are just a handful of the exotic avians featured in this series.’
    • ‘Armed with binoculars, they went in search of avians.’
    • ‘UK ornithologists are able to keep track of these aged avians because the birds are banded, or in British vernacular, ringed.’
    • ‘This time of year is ideal for spotting certain boreal or arctic avians in the Northeast United States, thanks to the combination of low temperatures and fallen leaves.’
    • ‘His stony gaze fixed upon the war-wagon; the chirps and squawks of the meadow birds and the cries of the avians of prey were overwhelmed by the grinding of the trail-wheels.’
    • ‘Similarities between primates and avians could be more attributable to homology than to convergence.’
    • ‘While we've encountered quite a few bird bloggers on the web, avians aren't the only critters being blogged about.’
    • ‘We need to better understand how all avians (birds and bats) interact with turbines so we can choose better locations for future turbines.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from Latin avis bird + -an.

Pronunciation

avian

/ˈāvēən/