Definition of aversion in English:

aversion

noun

  • 1A strong dislike or disinclination.

    ‘he had a deep-seated aversion to most forms of exercise’
    • ‘So many of us strive to raise our children with good moral values including an aversion to violence and aggression.’
    • ‘Not surprisingly, the aversion may be stronger when the person in question is a stranger.’
    • ‘He also observed the students learning an aversion to investigating patients' social and psychological problems.’
    • ‘He had an aversion to horror movies, but he would have preferred one to what he had seen on the screen.’
    • ‘Schopenhauer had an aversion to fighting, and even more of an aversion to fighting on the Prussian side against the French.’
    • ‘Our palates all have the same five types of detectors, the same aversion to bitter and mania for sweet.’
    • ‘What unites them is not an aversion to change, but an aversion to imposed change.’
    • ‘On the other hand, the standard tones could mean a lack of daring or even an aversion to technology.’
    • ‘I was a radio deejay for a time, so I have a strong aversion to anybody tampering with my visions of a real artist.’
    • ‘Ultimately what it amounts to is an aversion to pretentiousness and egomania.’
    • ‘After 20-odd years of this, my sister and I had a strong aversion to turkey, as it reminded us of some of the worst ever days of our lives.’
    • ‘She liked him, which is extremely important given her strong aversion to doctors.’
    • ‘This impression was often based on an aversion to the strong odour of the camels rather than the cameleers themselves.’
    • ‘On the other hand, if the diet was familiar to them, then they did not form a significant aversion to it.’
    • ‘Rats have evolved a strong, innate aversion to the smells of their predators.’
    • ‘Victims would develop an aversion to garlic and other blood-thinning agents.’
    • ‘Your latex allergy has brought me untold misery and your aversion to hot wax has cost me hundreds at the laser salon.’
    • ‘The U.S. government has a strong aversion to any commitments it does not think it will keep.’
    • ‘How could a taste for certain bright colours or an aversion to others possibly have helped our ancestors to survive?’
    • ‘For the most part, I hate losing hard earned money, hence my aversion to Las Vegas.’
    dislike of, distaste for, disinclination, abhorrence, hatred, hate, loathing, detestation, odium, antipathy, hostility
    disgust, revulsion, repugnance, horror
    phobia
    resistance, unwillingness, reluctance, avoidance, evasion, shunning
    allergy
    disrelish
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Someone or something that arouses strong feelings of dislike.
      • ‘The disciplined worker, he indicated, ‘was entitled to his own pet aversions.’’
      • ‘One of my pet aversions is sitting cooped up in an aircraft in a not too spacious or comfortable seat and being pummeled.’
      • ‘I have some food aversions and was wondering who else had some they wanted to share.’
      • ‘From the start, his themes were expressive of his personal traumas, his aversions and aspirations, and above all conflict with authority.’
      • ‘This led to their conclusion that odors associated with toxicity, like warning colors, can have a special intrinsic warning value and trigger innate aversions.’

Origin

Late 16th century (originally denoting the action of turning away or averting one's eyes): from Latin aversio(n-), from avertere turn away from (see avert).

Pronunciation:

aversion

/əˈvərZHən/