Definition of audience in English:

audience

noun

  • 1The assembled spectators or listeners at a public event, such as a play, movie, concert, or meeting.

    ‘the orchestra was given an enthusiastic ovation from the audience’
    • ‘She was known for her deep, piercing eyes and dusky, throaty voice that always seemed to command the full attention of audiences.’
    • ‘The most extraordinary synergy between performer and audience that I have ever seen.’
    • ‘This is the first time an accordion player has been invited to entertain audiences at the event.’
    • ‘Book festival audiences are inclined to be well disposed towards the writers they come to hear.’
    • ‘This remarkable film - finally released here two years after it was made - first entranced European audiences at the Berlin film festival.’
    • ‘At one of the recent public meetings on sustainable development, a member of the audience lamented the rapid pace of development in Bermuda.’
    • ‘And he's still a visible and vital presence on the concert circuit, where audiences come to revere the octogenarian.’
    • ‘The generally younger audience is treated to some exciting music from the different guest players who join the regular band.’
    • ‘Scheduled to be released in April, this is one film which will entertain audiences not in theatres but in school halls.’
    • ‘What is interesting of course is that this is the most successful Indian film with English speaking audiences in North America and Europe.’
    • ‘Oddly, for the first time all year, the meeting had a public audience.’
    • ‘And most unusual to be in a theatre audience that listened so intently.’
    • ‘Jerry spoke passionately about the sport for over two hours and answered many questions from a really enthusiastic audience.’
    • ‘I never understood the screaming hysteria, swooning, and sobbing that seem conventional behaviour for thronging female audiences at big rock concerts.’
    • ‘Six years ago, she had never even considered that she might take part in international music festivals and introduce bands to concert audiences.’
    • ‘And in any event the audiences in 1602 were no doubt so used to the convention of female parts being played by men that they barely noticed it.’
    • ‘The finished production, is performed in front of an audience of the general public and theatre representatives.’
    spectators, listeners, viewers, onlookers, concertgoers, theatregoers, patrons
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    1. 1.1 The people who watch or listen to a television or radio program.
      ‘the program attracted an audience of almost twenty million’
      • ‘BBC World Service attracts audiences of at least 150 million listeners each week.’
      • ‘The deal is a make or break situation for the struggling radio station which has failed to generate any sizeable audience.’
      • ‘Newspaper readership and television audiences are on the decline while the popularity of blogs and online news sources has steadily increased.’
      • ‘Such series have proved popular with viewers, attracting audiences of up to three million per programme and many sales to overseas networks.’
      • ‘A crowd of hundreds and a television audience of millions watched as Blaine began his self-imposed ordeal.’
      • ‘The council commended the way in which BBC Wales now works with its audiences, immersing programme makers in the community.’
      • ‘What is it that makes Fox News work so well at attracting a big audience on television but not online?’
      • ‘She is particularly well known to television audiences for her powerful performances in popular dramas.’
      • ‘If reports are correct, Saturday's edition was watched by one of the smallest audiences in the programme's forty-year history.’
      • ‘As everyone here will know, audiences for television are falling.’
      • ‘The event is also expected to attract a global television audience in excess of one billion people.’
      • ‘And programme promoters say they're attracting growing television audiences, which now stand at over 800,000.’
      • ‘He has a proven track record in developing innovative, award winning programmes which the BBC audiences love.’
      • ‘There is a wealth of entertainment and enlightenment in the many programmes for niche audiences, ranging from gardening and cookery to archaeology, wildlife, and art.’
      • ‘To survive, a commercial broadcaster must produce programmes that audiences want.’
      • ‘For years George Cole has delighted TV and film audiences with his portrayal of cheeky conmen.’
      • ‘Which brings us to the last dichotomy: the shifting relation between television and its audiences.’
      • ‘ITV has made many challenging programmes that made its audiences think about their world.’
      market, public, following, clientele, patronage, listenership, viewership
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    2. 1.2 The readership of a book, magazine, or newspaper.
      ‘the newspaper has a sophisticated audience’
      • ‘Freedom of Expression is an especially sensitive issue when young readers are the audience.’
      • ‘According to Millet, newspaper audiences began to lose their taste for sensationalist imagery in the '60s.’
      • ‘Clients and other audiences for the book will want to see more than just pretty pictures.’
      • ‘Although aimed at an older audience, this book displays the same lively, read-aloud quality.’
      • ‘If a particular novel does satisfy most readers in the target audience, it may be said to be successful.’
      • ‘Sociologists, psychologists, policy makers, and educated lay audiences will find this book interesting and helpful.’
      • ‘These books reach multi-ethnic audiences by emphasizing the universal within the culturally particular.’
      • ‘But does anyone remember when poets aimed for a big audience and wrote about public events?’
      • ‘It's just the latest example of the power of Weblogs to shape perception among a growing audience of online readers.’
      • ‘Who did you intend the audience of this book to be, and what do you hope they get from it?’
      • ‘Newspapers get the daily reader, while a magazine audience accumulates over time.’
      • ‘Now here I am thanking him for trusting me with his huge audience of loyal readers.’
      • ‘This is clearly a book with a western audience in mind, but there are plenty of ideas for the modern-day cook in India too.’
      • ‘The fact is, if you'd written this book for a younger audience, I think it would have been more magical.’
      • ‘From what I understand the big political blogs actually have larger audiences then most political magazines.’
      • ‘Today, the largest audiences are not for books.’
      • ‘Written for the general audience, this book could captivate any reader.’
      • ‘After all, more readers means a bigger audience for advertisements.’
      • ‘You must remember that these stories were written for an adult audience, for a newspaper audience.’
      • ‘That's as it should be, as the newspaper has a global audience but not global printing presses.’
      customer, client, patron
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    3. 1.3 The people giving or likely to give attention to something.
      ‘there will always be an audience for romantic literature’
      • ‘While the obsession with risk shows little sign of abating, there is a large and diverse audience for critical voices in discussions about this trend.’
      • ‘Later, chromolithographed posters brought their products to the attention of a wider audience.’
      • ‘It's a way of bringing writers to the attention of audiences who wouldn't otherwise buy their books.’
      • ‘This event will reach a worldwide audience as the team set out to put Ireland on the map.’
      • ‘But there are ways of improving your chances of garnering attention and gaining an audience.’
      • ‘There are many ways you can make sure your marketing materials grab the attention of your audience.’
      • ‘Who is the most receptive audience for this kind of rhetorical gesture?’
      • ‘All of this is in our effort to promote and market gay and lesbian authors and books to a wider audience.’
      • ‘The most receptive audience will probably be the employers whose faulty workplace conditions are alleged to be causing RSI.’
      • ‘But it will open up the joys of the spa to a far wider audience, even with two-hour spa sessions costing £19.’
      • ‘Whether it will reach this target audience is an open question.’
      • ‘The promise of reaching a captive, targeted audience eventually made converts, though.’
      • ‘On line service and television footage have taken this event to an audience of world wide proportions.’
      • ‘Thus, Responsible Conduct with Animals in Research should find a ready and receptive audience.’
      • ‘Some political commentators contend that he would find it hard to sell himself to a conservative national audience.’
      • ‘His influence was by no means confined to England; indeed, his most receptive audience was to be found in the German states.’
  • 2A formal interview with a person in authority.

    ‘he demanded an audience with the Pope’
    • ‘His meals begin with breakfast at 8am, after which he goes to his study for two hours of reading and writing, followed by two hours of formal audiences before lunch.’
    • ‘Pope John Paul II is kissed by an unidentified nun during a weekly general audience at the Vatican on Wednesday.’
    • ‘No other of the Enlightened Despots was more fond than Gustav of the time-wasting rituals of court life, the levees, formal audiences and ceremonial entries and exits.’
    • ‘Pope John Paul II dedicated his weekly general audience at the Vatican to commemorate the attacks.’
    meeting, discussion, conference, question and answer session, examination, evaluation, interrogation
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  • 3archaic Formal hearing.

    • ‘He did not have a right of audience in relation to the hearing on 9 September 2002.’
    meeting, consultation, conference, hearing, reception, interview, question and answer session, exchange, dialogue, discussion
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin audientia, from audire ‘hear’.

Pronunciation

audience

/ˈôdēəns//ˈɔdiəns/