Definition of attune in US English:

attune

verb

[with object]usually be attuned
  • 1Make receptive or aware.

    ‘a society more attuned to consumerism than ideology’
    ‘the Department is very attuned politically’
    • ‘Many editors understood that being more attuned to readers was an important responsibility.’
    • ‘Therefore, the most successful programs were those that were attuned to the future and flexible enough to respond quickly.’
    • ‘Early learning environments in which teachers are attuned to temperamental differences among children may help to provide a comprehensive basis for the development of skills important for learning.’
    • ‘The Bochum Symphony Orchestra are attuned to these overtly romantic pieces and both soloists are also top class interpreters.’
    • ‘US politicians are attuned to petroleum's importance to their career prospects.’
    • ‘It was a natural growth for a vital composer who had her ears keenly attuned to new developments, and could selectively integrate what she wanted into her own personal idiom.’
    • ‘A station that is attuned to your needs, concerns and kind of music.’
    • ‘‘Effective managers have to be attuned to what's going on in their departments, but they are not psychotherapists,’ states Kipper.’
    • ‘What he has delivered is a powerful and solid opera, beautifully attuned to the expectations of its audience, challenging but never going too far, involving and magical.’
    • ‘Emotions are also more vulnerable to manipulation by marketers, since they are attuned to respond to novelty, and visual stimulus.’
    • ‘The 1930s thrillers seem more politically aware and attuned to their times.’
    • ‘Stenhammar's art seems far more attuned to the Swedish spirit.’
    • ‘By being attuned to individual students' personal goals, teachers can assist students who otherwise might give up.’
    • ‘Much of Weaver's writing is devoted to the context in which food is grown and eaten, so he is particularly attuned to political contexts.’
    • ‘Health care practitioners who are not attuned to racial differences may not be aware of unique physical conditions as well.’
    • ‘Catholic health-care leaders themselves are attuned to the problems these developments pose.’
    • ‘Members were attuned to the political environment and sought what was politically possible.’
    • ‘We who are attuned to the cycles of Nature and the rhythms of the Earth often feel overwhelmed by the escalating environmental crises.’
    • ‘At the same time, he was equipped with a political antenna that was finely attuned to social discontent and class conflict.’
    1. 1.1 Accustom or acclimatize.
      ‘students are not attuned to making decisions’
      • ‘For the mind is so attuned to the reception of facial signals that almost any combination of two dots and a dash will suffice.’
      • ‘They draw us into another world, their world, to which we must attune and acclimatize ourselves.’
      • ‘Intelligence tools, furthermore, must be attuned to geographic conditions.’
      • ‘This means education systems and economic structures that are attuned to, and can adapt to, global technological innovations.’
      • ‘This tells us that human beings are exquisitely attuned to interpreting and responding to social signals.’
      • ‘Said Jeff, ‘… I am pretty elderly myself and I do not feel a need for a firearm especially attuned to my aging condition.’’
      • ‘She is much more attuned than I am to the technology.’
      accustom, adjust, adapt, acclimatize, assimilate, condition, accommodate, tailor
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Make harmonious.
      ‘the interests of East and West are now closely attuned’
      • ‘Professionally, the men are clearly closely attuned.’
      • ‘Although the three were not ideally attuned, they brought a gentle whiff of nostalgia to a season of high-keyed dance.’
    3. 1.3no object Become receptive to or aware of.
      ‘a conscious attempt to attune to the wider audience’
      • ‘What affects a surfer's riding is his ability to attune to these rhythms.’
      • ‘Typically, it is the mother who learns to read and attune to the baby, so the child has less need to develop these skills in his/her relationship with her.’
      • ‘Go at your own pace, making small adjustments that attune to your mood, level and physical ability.’
      • ‘But when I get in touch with another religion, and I attune to their dimension of the holy, I can bring that attunement back and enhance my connection’
      • ‘Even if you are not exercising, you can change your mood by attuning to your breath, noticing where you feel blocked, and deepening and opening the lungs.’
      • ‘Our cells are beginning to reorganize, restructure, and attune to the higher vibratory frequency.’
      • ‘He can attune to the psyches of both the writer and reader, as in his comments on Angela Carter, Arthur Miller or on Beirut Blues.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from at- + tune.

Pronunciation

attune

/əˈt(j)un//əˈt(y)o͞on/