Main definitions of attic in English

: attic1Attic2

attic1

noun

  • A space or room just below the roof of a building.

    • ‘The office was in the attic of one of those six storey buildings in South Kensington.’
    • ‘The space between the attic and the rest of the house is lined with aluminium for insulation.’
    • ‘Five steep steps led to a low-ceilinged attic bathroom with permanently dim lighting.’
    • ‘Subject to planning permission, there is potential to convert the unused floored attics in these bedrooms into further accommodation.’
    • ‘I was in a smaller room that was next to the stairs leading to the attic where the servants used to live.’
    • ‘The agents suggest that the attic rooms could be used as play areas or a study.’
    • ‘If you need extra space then the attic upstairs could be easily converted into two more rooms.’
    • ‘He was particularly interested in the attics of old buildings, where he sometimes found valuable artefacts among the rubbish.’
    • ‘Hanging the towel on a heated rail to dry, I wandered back up to the attic room, combing my hair with my fingers.’
    • ‘Air also enters the living space from other unheated parts of the house, such as attics, basements, or crawl spaces.’
    • ‘Spare bedrooms or large closets make good drying rooms, but hot attics and damp cellars generally do not.’
    • ‘They had a small attic room in the roof which was full of old toys.’
    • ‘Nests may be built in trees and shrubs but are frequently found under building overhangs, in attics, barns, garages and sheds.’
    • ‘There is a spacious attic bedroom, which could also be suitable for use as a study or home office.’
    • ‘The house now has three bedrooms and a fourth in the attic with a sloping roof that is perfect for his grandchildren.’
    • ‘There are five bedrooms, a lounge and bathroom on the first floor and two more bedrooms in the attic.’
    • ‘Telli woke the next morning to the patter of rain on the roof above his attic room.’
    • ‘After turning off the lamp in the attic, she headed back downstairs and into the dark hallways of the school.’
    • ‘Within minutes the fire had spread upstairs, trapping the teenager in her attic bedroom.’
    • ‘The attic room was a lot bigger then she had imagined it to be and was set up with everything that she needed.’
    loft, roof space, cock loft
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Origin

Late 17th century (as an architectural term designating a small order (column and entablature) above a taller one): from French attique, from Latin Atticus ‘relating to Athens or Attica’.

Pronunciation

attic

/ˈadik//ˈædɪk/

Main definitions of attic in English

: attic1Attic2

Attic2

adjective

  • Relating to Athens or Attica, or the dialect of Greek spoken there in ancient times.

    • ‘The religious vision from which Attic tragedy emerged was one of the human community as a kind of besieged citadel.’
    • ‘As in the main scene, she wears a high-crested Attic helmet.’
    • ‘The Persians marched across the Attic peninsula and burned Athens.’
    • ‘It is written in Attic Greek, with much studiedly antithetical rhetoric and frequent verbal borrowings from the classical authors.’
    • ‘There were also fragments of earlier unglazed Corinthian and Attic lamps of the second to fourth centuries.’
    • ‘Fluent in English, Spanish, French, German, Attic Greek, and Latin in addition to his native Dutch, he turned out to be a sharp and engaging philosophy student.’
    ancient greek, grecian, hellenic
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noun

  • The dialect of Greek used by the ancient Athenians, the chief literary form of classical Greek.

Origin

Late 16th century: via Latin from Greek Attikos.

Pronunciation

Attic

/ˈadik//ˈædɪk/