Definition of assent in English:

assent

noun

  • 1The expression of approval or agreement.

    ‘a loud murmur of assent’
    ‘he nodded assent’
    • ‘When it is a case of majority assent or approval, issues arise as to the effect on the minority.’
    • ‘These ordinances were read out before the community at a further churchyard meeting in September and received community assent.’
    • ‘She is the sort of person who, if you called her an unregenerate hippie, might proudly nod assent.’
    • ‘Everyone nodded and murmured their assent, and then began to shout out suggestions.’
    • ‘The thesis received respectful attention, but it did not win assent or committed followers.’
    • ‘He stared at me for a moment, as if searching for the proper response, and then finally nodded in assent.’
    • ‘Her eyes held him steady and he breathed deeply before nodding in assent.’
    • ‘Imagine your private thrill when everyone in the congregation nodded assent.’
    • ‘A few murmurs of assent ran down the table's length at that remark.’
    • ‘There were murmurs of assent before the messenger replied.’
    • ‘Both ambassadors nodded assent, as did the Council President as he looked around the room.’
    • ‘I nodded assent, and promptly closed my eyes and began to daydream.’
    • ‘This doubt spreads to the narrator's reliance on the narratee's assent and approval.’
    • ‘I nodded in assent, and slowly moved forward to embrace my coach, mentor, and friend in a gesture of thanks.’
    • ‘The others nodded their assent and went back to their respective homes.’
    • ‘The most honourable manner of signifying their assent, is to express their applause by the sound of their arms.’
    • ‘Parental consent and child assent was received from all dyads.’
    • ‘For example, the voice actors issue pre-recorded phone calls and their conversations are such that all you can do is nod or assent.’
    • ‘They indicate those objects toward which and those areas within which every human being is entitled to act without securing further permission or assent.’
    • ‘It is a deviation from the party line, but a murmur of assent goes up.’
    approval, acceptance, endorsement, encouragement, recognition, appreciation, support, respect, admiration, commendation, congratulations
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    1. 1.1 Official agreement or sanction.
      ‘the governor has power to withhold his assent from a bill’
      • ‘In such cases, it has the power either to assent or to withhold assent.’
      • ‘Because subjects who give assent have diminished capacity, permission from their proxies also should be obtained.’
      • ‘Peers had attempted to extend disability rights to sufferers of depression, but backed down from a confrontation and allowed the bill to gain assent.’
      • ‘They give ample assurance that it would be unreasonable to withhold assent.’
      • ‘He has power to veto bills by withholding his assent.’
      • ‘At the moment, the treaty assumes each state will go through with its own ratification procedure either by referendum or by assent through individual parliaments.’
      • ‘This provision requires the Council to act unanimously after receiving the opinion of the Commission and the assent of the Parliament.’
      • ‘If the president withholds his assent, the bill will be killed.’
      • ‘Allowing time for completion of the negotiations, then assent and ratification, the first accessions are expected around 2004.’
      • ‘His professed attitude of withholding assent was adopted to avoid error and rashness of judgement.’
      • ‘Since passage of a bill into law required the assent of all three institutions, compromise was essential.’
      • ‘It now awaits ratification and the assent by the Chancellor, as the move requires a change in the University statute.’
      • ‘Later, there is a formal ceremony in Rome but his authority as Pope is present from the moment of assent.’
      • ‘‘The present Act never received assent, but this has never been properly challenged,’ she said.’
      • ‘Upper houses have only one hold over governments, their ability to withhold assent from government legislation.’
      • ‘But we say the Chief Justice was right to draw distinction between prospective assent and ratification.’
      • ‘But they clung to their plan and carried on without constitutional approval and parliamentary assent.’
      agreement, acceptance, approval, approbation, consent, acquiescence, compliance, concurrence
      blessing, imprimatur, seal of approval, stamp of approval, rubber stamp
      sanction, endorsement, ratification, authorization, mandate, licence, validation
      confirmation, support, backing
      permission, leave
      the go-ahead, the green light, the ok, the thumbs up, the nod, say-so
      View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Express approval or agreement, typically officially.

    ‘Roosevelt assented to the agreement’
    [with direct speech] ‘“Guest house, then,” Frank assented cheerfully’
    • ‘The patient may then readily assent to other requirements we both agree on.’
    • ‘The others nodded in mute agreement, assenting to the terms set down by the car's owner.’
    • ‘The Executive undertakes to produce a coherent programme of government which the parliament is duty bound to scrutinise, debate and give assent to.’
    • ‘His acceptance of them as hypotheses does not require assenting to them.’
    • ‘They declared themselves incapable of assenting to any changes touching the Church without the authorization of the Assembly of the Clergy.’
    • ‘We then asked all children of consenting parents to assent to study participation.’
    • ‘By convention, the monarch will not refuse her assent to a Bill passed by Parliament and she will act on the advice of her ministers.’
    • ‘The theological debates of the time come alive through his bourgeois, sporting, nonintellectual hero who nonetheless is dogged in trying to find out what precisely he would be assenting to in becoming an Anglican clergyman.’
    • ‘They might even assent to the idea that more and more women want marriage and children, not the bogus liberation that the sexual revolution purveyed.’
    • ‘The Senate, on a voice vote Monday, gave its assent to the legislation three days after the House blessed it by 298-121.’
    • ‘Should Parliament assent to the amendments, this requirement will fall away.’
    • ‘‘They're still our heroes,’ said one, the nods and sound-bites from those around him signalling assent to his view.’
    • ‘Yet a vague assent to a vague assertion only yields twice as much vagueness.’
    • ‘To assent to obvious lies is to co-operate with evil, and in some small way to become evil oneself.’
    • ‘Factual assent to an armed assault is one matter; ideological commitment to it another.’
    • ‘Certainly he appears to be fulfilling all the legal functions of the role adequately, such as assenting to laws and setting session times for Parliament.’
    • ‘I assented to them all: not one of them created the slightest intellectual difficulty, save the major premise of God's existence.’
    • ‘The pope cannot remit any guilt, except by declaring that it has been remitted by God and by assenting to God's remission.’
    • ‘The formality of being made to click assent is significant, even if one is assenting to standard form contracts.’
    • ‘For such an effort to have been mounted so quickly, and for the Russians to have assented to outside help so speedily, speaks volumes for all concerned.’
    agree to, accept, approve, consent to, acquiesce in, concur in, accede to, give one's blessing to, bless, give one's seal of approval to, give one's stamp of approval to, rubber-stamp, say yes to
    ratify, sanction, endorse, authorize, mandate, license, warrant, validate, pass
    confirm, support, back
    give one's leave, give one's permission
    give the go-ahead to, give the green light to, give the ok to, ok, give the thumbs up to, give the nod, say the word, buy
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French as(s)enter (verb), as(s)ente (noun), based on Latin assentiri, from ad- toward + sentire feel, think.

Pronunciation:

assent

/əˈsent/