Definition of ashore in English:

ashore

adverb

  • 1To or on the shore from the direction of the sea.

    ‘the seals come ashore to breed’
    • ‘The day dawned fine and they returned to Shipbuilders Cove and went ashore.’
    • ‘Sailors from the ship also wanted to get ashore during this time to help with the aid and restoration program.’
    • ‘He was rescued and taken ashore to Guatemala by coastguards last year.’
    • ‘Redwing ordered them to lower the anchor, and they got into the jolly boats and went ashore.’
    • ‘Then there were the marine corps and army infantry who waded ashore or were landed by air on island after island.’
    • ‘If they are successful, the men will step ashore for the first time in four months when they reach the coast of California.’
    • ‘Vangelis travelled ashore by pulling on the rope attached to the shore bollard and returned by pulling on the rope attached to the ferry.’
    • ‘As we scrambled ashore, more experienced sailors were taking to the water with glee aboard a fleet of dinghies and catamarans.’
    • ‘Before this the staff had only been able to fly ashore for a couple of days' rest on a rotational basis.’
    • ‘Current estimates are that more than a quarter of a million people died when the waves swept ashore.’
    • ‘He taught them how to approach the whale, iron it, bring it ashore, butcher, render and eat it.’
    • ‘Handing over the helm he directed me close to land, hopped ashore and left us to fate.’
    • ‘We go ashore by dinghy at a pretty stone jetty surrounded by dense trees and rhododendron bushes.’
    • ‘They had suffered only minor shock and injuries and subsequently were transferred ashore.’
    • ‘In their voyage through the remote islands and atolls they seldom took the boy ashore, fearing infection.’
    • ‘Richard was tossed into the sea and spent two hours in the freezing water trying to swim ashore but was constantly beaten back by fierce waves.’
    • ‘Following another night at anchor we conduct another pax transfer ashore.’
    • ‘These can hit the shore within minutes on occasion, and can rush ashore without warning causing immeasurable damage.’
    • ‘Mathew and his shipmates recovered the man and his five friends to Hawkesbury and took them ashore.’
    • ‘When he was very small a group of Phoenician sailors came ashore for trading and stayed over a year.’
    on to land, on to the land, on to the shore
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 On land as opposed to at sea.
      ‘we spent the day ashore’
      • ‘Like many of the earlier heraldic flags, it seems that this form of flag originated in military use ashore.’
      • ‘We returned to the jetty and the sailors fastened the boat ashore.’
      • ‘In between official duties sailors managed to get ashore to take in the sights of Exeter and Torquay.’
      • ‘The prize gives special emphasis to research which improves the management or techniques in sick bays ashore and afloat.’
      • ‘A volunteer party from Monmouth went ashore when the ship called in at the island during the latest stage of her patrol of the region.’
      • ‘Sailors from Argyll are involved in two projects ashore, the more ambitious one being the building of a health clinic.’
      • ‘This is also the time to talk to the authorities about public shelters ashore.’
      • ‘Polystyrene blocks are to be removed from the crew accommodation and the starboard side of the engine room and stored ashore.’
      • ‘First and foremost, never, ever leave food aboard a boat that is being stored ashore.’
      • ‘Due to the situation ashore in Honiara, there has been no shore leave allowed over the two months the ship was there.’
      • ‘Flying low, they not only checked boats afloat, but those stored ashore as well.’
      • ‘That will take some adjustment to how we organize maintenance and training ashore.’
      • ‘This meant that the crew would be ashore for anything up to two months at a time.’

Pronunciation

ashore

/əˈʃɔr//əˈSHôr/