Definition of around in English:

around

adverb

  • 1British Located or situated on every side.

    ‘the mountains towering all around’
    ‘a building visible for miles around’
    • ‘Some of the bigger bangs and flashes of light could be seen and heard for miles around.’
    • ‘For a single week of the summer, there will hardly be a coach or limousine available for miles around.’
    • ‘People came from miles around to go to the Market Hall because of the atmosphere and the stalls.’
    • ‘Fireworks are not private nor personal as they disturb and frighten people and animals for miles around.’
    • ‘Every motorbike for miles around is heading for the lake at the town centre.’
    • ‘This place really is in the middle of nowhere; there is no sign of life for miles around.’
    • ‘First, Debenhams have the last say in which shops are situated around them.’
    • ‘Everywhere around me, the editorial staff were putting the magazine to bed.’
    • ‘They where commenting on how much more the area around had become very shabby.’
    • ‘It could be seen for miles around and adds a new phrase to the English language.’
    • ‘Smoke from the fire could be seen billowing into the sky for miles around.’
    • ‘Juliet yelled as she ran up to her friend who was still beating up the boy with the crowd around.’
    • ‘You are likely to be the only one for miles around with such a unique Christmas decoration.’
    • ‘Even so, what marks the dive is the feeling that every fish for miles around has come here to enjoy the current.’
    • ‘There follows page after page of pencil sketches showing how they think it will look from miles around.’
    • ‘The bridge will have in-built lighting which should enable the bridge to be seen from miles around.’
    • ‘We expect every lunatic terrorist from miles around to descend on us like bees to honey’
    • ‘Victoria Mill chimney in Skipton is a landmark easily visible for miles around.’
    • ‘It would affect residents the whole length of its route and would be visible for miles around.’
    • ‘The night sky was lit up for miles around by the flame from the new ‘big one’ at the iron works.’
    • ‘Odd that the local pub doesn't get a mention, given that it's the only place you can buy food for miles around.’
    • ‘The glowing orangish-red tip seems to be the only source of light for miles around.’
    on every side, on all sides, in all directions, throughout, all over, all over the place, everywhere, about, here and there
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 So as to surround someone or something.
      ‘everyone crowded around’
      ‘a pool with banks all the way around’
      • ‘Crowds of refugees outside Fallujah gather around at the burial of resistance fighters.’
      • ‘I shouted at everyone to get back because they were crowding around and then we carried out CPR.’
      • ‘There was a patter of feet as several people crowded around to get a good look at Hazel.’
      • ‘Now various companies are circling around in the hope of taking over Railtrack.’
      • ‘There was a new waiting room, with guideropes snaking around to guide the crowds, who weren't there.’
    2. 1.2 So as to give support and companionship.
      ‘sometimes you wonder how many friends will rally around you when your life hits rock-bottom’
      • ‘Today, in our post-ideological times, there is less for the elite to rally around.’
      • ‘Mrs Sharp spoke of how everyone rallied around and comforted the injured youngster.’
      • ‘Once residents begin to understand what this home is, they will rally around and support them.’
      • ‘The point of the fact is, Canadians have come around to support what they now realize to be a wise move.’
    3. 1.3 With circular motion.
      ‘the boats were spun around by waterspouts’
      • ‘They spun around her and she watched the gorgeous show being laid out before her.’
      • ‘As she embraced me I lifted her up into the air and spun her around causing her to laugh.’
      • ‘She began to giggle as Jude lifted her into the air and spun her around and around again.’
      • ‘It's shaped like a circle and I love it when she spins me around and around and then I try to walk.’
      • ‘Her patience ran out after driving around in circles for more than a quarter of an hour.’
      • ‘Now it is done in a centrifuge, which whirls the milk around rapidly in a circular vessel.’
      • ‘He watched the chunks of vegetable spinning around and wished that she'd go away.’
      • ‘She spun around in a circle and then leaned against the wall, bringing up a fist to her mouth.’
      • ‘Elizabeth spun around in a circle, making the skirt of her pale, pink dress twirl prettily.’
      • ‘She put the ultrasound head on the gel and began moving it around in a circular motion.’
      • ‘How come the protons in the nucleus of an atom do not spin around like the electrons do?’
      • ‘Suddenly she stood up and spun around and threw the rock at the man who was behind her.’
      • ‘Keith's occupation as a taxi driver is ironic in that he is literally driving around in circles.’
      • ‘Motorists driving to the hospital are often forced to drive around in circles in a bid to find a parking space.’
      • ‘This featured images of pills of all shapes and colours spinning around in space as if in freefall.’
      • ‘He patted one of his sons on the head and picked the other up in his arms, spinning him around.’
      • ‘Element grabbed the handle of the spear with both hands and started to spin it around.’
      • ‘It was entirely dark save for the strobe lights spinning around at the front of the gym.’
      • ‘Constable Reid noted that on his way to the cruiser King spun around and almost fell.’
    4. 1.4 So as to cover or take in the whole area surrounding a particular center.
      ‘she paused to glance around admiringly at the decor’
      • ‘There are plenty of tourism operators in the area to show you around and crank up the thrill factor.’
      • ‘The thing to do is experiment, read around, be critical, and draw your own conclusions.’
      • ‘She ran out onto the dusty road and glanced around to see if she could find the young man.’
    5. 1.5 So as to reach everyone in a particular group or area.
      ‘he passed a newspaper clipping around’
      • ‘Valerine joined them while Mint went around making sure everyone was all right.’
      • ‘But perhaps Bill would have been better off sending it around to everyone to start off with.’
      • ‘If we had macaroni and cheese we could go around and boast to everyone in the village about what we had to eat.’
      • ‘I wouldn't like to be one of the guys that leads them out and parades them around.’
      • ‘We sent a demo of stuff around all the record companies and we got the standard rejection letters.’
      • ‘When I was at college there was a girl who went around telling everyone that she was anorexic.’
      • ‘In the circulars sent around by the union promoting the deal, no comment is made on this.’
  • 2British So as to rotate and face in the opposite direction.

    ‘Jack seized her by the shoulders and turned her around’
    figurative ‘having him in my corner has turned my career around’
    • ‘Gently he turned him around to meet his eyes and all movement from the other boy ceased immediately.’
    • ‘Then, I spoke up in reply to his comment, and he swivelled around and gave me a hell of a strange look.’
    • ‘Once he had finished he turned around and started to head in my direction but stopped in his tracks.’
    • ‘He didn't turn his chair around and instead stayed facing the front of the room.’
    • ‘Lacey swivelled around on her computer chair and grabbed a pillow from the bed beside her.’
    • ‘Stating that any observation that works in one direction is also true when turned around.’
    • ‘I didn't mean to say it loudly, but everyone snickered and turned around to look at me.’
    • ‘The court heard that the ambulance was spun around by the force of the collision, of which Kelly had no memory.’
    • ‘I turned around to meet with the gaze of the gunmen that were firing at me a minute ago.’
    • ‘I walked a few steps further and then turned around and peered directly into the store.’
    • ‘She turned around and pointed in the direction of what looked like a little office.’
    • ‘She laughed to herself as she stepped directly behind Liam and twisted his chair around.’
    • ‘She did so, turning around to meet his gaze evenly even though Cameron was a head taller.’
    • ‘Just after I'd been given the cold shoulder by his support, I turned around and there he was.’
    • ‘Inside the pub he felt someone grab him from behind and swivelled around quickly.’
    • ‘The behemoth of Lothian Road is visibly swinging around to meet the strictures of the stock market.’
    • ‘When he talks, he swings around on his chair so he is effectively facing me.’
    • ‘She was sitting on the chair at her desk which she had turned around to face the TV to the left of her bed.’
    • ‘Swivelling it around, Graeme let Jon look at the screen as the lines began to cycle out.’
    • ‘The manager reaches across the desk, picks up the sheet and swivels around in his chair to face him.’
    • ‘When they got to the door, he turned them around, and the crowd surged another cheer towards them.’
    • ‘I turned around in the opposite direction and started down the hall to my Band class.’
    in the opposite direction, in the reverse direction, to face the other way, backwards, to the rear
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 So as to lead in another direction.
      ‘it was the last house before the road curved around’
      • ‘When we came to the end of the road we turned around and headed for the beach.’
      • ‘Still, if the road had been curving around, then it should be over that way somewhere.’
      • ‘As they approach the side road to take them around to the back entrance, they kill the siren.’
    2. 2.2 Used in describing the position of something, typically with regard to the direction in which it is facing or its relation to other items.
      ‘the picture shows the pieces the wrong way around’
      • ‘You however, seem to have got this concept completely the wrong way around.’
      • ‘A couple behind her told her she was putting it in the wrong way around.’
      • ‘A routine check revealed her heart was on the wrong side of her body and two of her heart chambers were the wrong way around.’
    3. 2.3 Used to describe a situation in terms of the relation between people, actions, or events.
      ‘it was he who was attacking her, not the other way around’
      • ‘They tell Venn and her minions which way is up, not the other way around.’
      • ‘Art imitates life, or is it the other way around?’
  • 3In or to many places throughout a locality.

    ‘word got around that he was on the verge of retirement’
    ‘his only ambition is to drive around in a sports car’
    • ‘After I got off the phone with him, I went out to my car and drove around for awhile.’
    • ‘Once upon a time you could drive around with a radar detector so you knew where the radar traps were.’
    • ‘There was a rumor going around at the meet 'n' greet and then among people going in to the concert that you were there.’
    • ‘I think that he is moving around meeting as many of these groups as possible.’
    • ‘We drove around and eventually found a reasonable hotel on the outskirts of the town.’
    • ‘Now you can zap all of your huge CD collection on to one small portable hard drive and carry it around with you.’
    • ‘I have now been driving this Kia around for about five days and have discovered that it goes like the clappers.’
    • ‘If driving around looking for gifts is more pain than pleasure, why not let the Net do the shopping for you?’
    • ‘Lucas was adamant about having a nice, reliable car for us to drive the baby around in.’
    • ‘Today, he drives around in a vivid red Ferrari with a personalised numberplate.’
    • ‘They will be driving around and spraying with Malathion in an effort to kill the enemy out.’
    • ‘A couple of seasons later he owned a black Honda City, the car that he drives around in.’
    • ‘He had been driving around slowly, shouting abuse and making obscene gestures at police officers.’
    • ‘He had been driving around and around after school ended, looking for something to do.’
    • ‘Today's Question: Which Celebrity would you most like to drive around for an hour with?’
    • ‘Bored, he spends all day driving around in his hire car - a white Fiat Uno, as it happens.’
    • ‘Do they park up and pay up, or do they drive around looking for a free space in another street?’
    • ‘Top agents will collect you on arrival at the airport and drive you around to view selected properties.’
    • ‘So hanging out was good, we talked about something else and drove around and had all in all a nice time.’
    • ‘In fact, word went around among the five- and six-year-olds that she was a witch.’
    1. 3.1British So as to reach a new place or position, typically by moving from one side of something to the other.
      ‘he made his way around to the back of the building’
      ‘they went the long way around by the main road’
      • ‘They had to go around to locate the statue, and then got in, through a door there.’
      • ‘He got out and came around to her side, opening the door and leading her out by her hand.’
      • ‘Slowly she pushed herself up off the ground and stumbled around to the other side of the house.’
      • ‘You have to come at the trap on its left side and swing around it at the last minute.’
      • ‘Daryl also got out of the car and went around to her side, pressing her body against the car.’
      • ‘Greta comes around to the side of the bed where Madison is standing and hands Emily a string.’
    2. 3.2 Used to convey an ability to navigate or orient oneself.
      ‘I like pupils to find their own way around’
      • ‘However, this appendix is both hard to follow and difficult to navigate around.’
      • ‘Their online version has also been updated making it easier to navigate around in.’
      • ‘I wanted people to say that I knew how to find my way around and earn a living.’
      • ‘Global maps have their uses, but most knowing our way around is at the level of gardens and localities.’
    3. 3.3informal Used to convey the idea of visiting someone else.
      ‘why don't you come around to my office?’
      • ‘Never one to miss an opportunity, he called around and met Leo and Lacey.’
      • ‘Paul came around shortly after lunch and we drove out to Maldon to enjoy the sun.’
      • ‘Anyone reading this who'll be in the area is welcome to come around and meet me and the rest of us.’
      • ‘He did some work at Cyberia, and invited her around to show off his hard drives.’
      • ‘Do they really think the police will drive around when they hear a banger going off?’
      • ‘I drove around to see mum when the sun was at its height and the day was so hot it had pushed the cat into the shade of the flowerbeds.’
      • ‘There was one day when a whole bunch came around, and one of the girls had a baby with her.’
  • 4Randomly or unsystematically; here and there.

    ‘one of them was glancing nervously around’
    ‘John tried to focus on her but she kept moving around’
    • ‘After watching the end of the parade, and a fancy dress contest we wandered around.’
    • ‘It was either that or wander around outside so it was safer to be inside.’
    • ‘LA isn't really the kind of place that you just go wandering around in on foot.’
    • ‘Still, we hooked up with my sister and spent a very enjoyable day wandering around, so that was nice.’
    • ‘I was wandering around in a daze, in a white frock, and people were saying nice things.’
    • ‘I wandered around until daylight and caught some sleep in the sunshine whenever I could.’
    • ‘I feel slightly lost, not depressed or anything just wandering around with little to do.’
    • ‘And if it does, you can't expect everyone to stand around and accept you as you are.’
    • ‘I wandered aimlessly around thinking about the play and failing to find a wireless hotspot.’
    • ‘He'd driven the van around aimlessly until it had run out of fuel and spluttered and died.’
    • ‘I'm wandering around in a restless state, reading a page from one book and moving on to another.’
    • ‘Everyone was standing around applauding because they thought it was such a work of genius.’
    • ‘It just seemed like everyone was just sitting around waiting for the world to end.’
    • ‘One time we were at a party and everyone was sitting around talking about sex and relationships.’
    • ‘After the first rehearsal, we sat around planning our careers in the music business.’
    • ‘When it becomes crowded they carefully root around in loose jacket pockets or open handbags.’
    • ‘Why should we have yet more people, wandering around stoned, causing mayhem on our streets?’
    • ‘After that, headed off to the Marais, where she left me to wander around on my own.’
    • ‘Being able to wander around aimlessly is the best way to see things that you'd normally never see, new bands.’
    • ‘Sailors in bleached white uniforms wander around trying to convince themselves they are having fun.’
    from place to place, around, about, to and fro, hither and thither, back and forth, in all directions, from pillar to post
    View synonyms
  • 5British In existence, in the vicinity, or in active use.

    ‘there was no one around’
    ‘barley has been around for a long time’
    ‘by being around I threaten her happiness’
    • ‘There are lots of Weblogs already around but only the tip of the iceberg is visible.’
    • ‘By this time I was getting a bit anxious about all the crowds of people around, as I am not used to that these days.’
    • ‘Since the two incidents, Petra has been kept on a lead and had a muzzle on when people are around, the court heard.’
    • ‘The only regret she mentions is that her father is not around to receive a signed copy.’
    • ‘Answer: if you learn a word from a newspaper, it won't be around in another six months time.’
    • ‘They know they are not going to be around when Livingstone takes over the tube.’
    • ‘The open but complex moorland of Ilkley is thought to be one of the most challenging orienteering areas around.’
    • ‘I agree with you that while there are a plethora of organisations around, unity would be better.’
    • ‘He seems to still have a few friends around, if the motley crew taking up both sides of the stage are anything to go by.’
    • ‘And there were more ballet companies around at that time than is often remembered.’
    • ‘There are old people's flats around and they feel threatened with the rowdy behavior of these kids.’
    • ‘It stuck around even through Margaret Thatcher's reign because nobody dared tinker with it.’
    • ‘We need Community Support Officers around when people are feeling vulnerable at night.’
    • ‘What they have been keeping to themselves is one of the most user-friendly cycle routes around.’
    • ‘It's been tough for Dav, tough for the board and tough for everyone around.’
    • ‘Love means sticking around through the tough times and not baling out because of a little trouble.’
    • ‘We make sure there are enough competitions around and fights organised at the club level to keep them busy too.’
    • ‘This did not mean, however, that his ideas were accepted by everyone around.’
    nearby, near, about, close by, close, at hand, close at hand, in the vicinity, in the neighbourhood, on the doorstep, round the corner, just round the corner, within reach, within easy reach, at close range, hard by
    View synonyms
    1. 5.1 Near at hand.
      ‘he would want to have her around as much as possible’
      • ‘She was afraid to get near me with him around, but she was the lesser of the two evils.’
      • ‘She stays around near the village and it is possible to dive or snorkel with her.’
      • ‘He was a devoted soldier who had pride in whatever he did and was highly regarded by those around him.’
  • 6Approximately; about.

    ‘software costs would be around $1,500’
    as preposition ‘I returned to my hotel around 3 a.m.’
    • ‘It was a long drive to our next stop - around 160 miles to the east on the coast at Torrent.’
    • ‘Vinny and Neil managed to meet in Iraq around three weeks ago while both were stationed in Basra.’
    • ‘They are due to perform to a sell-out crowd of around 130 proud parents and friends.’
    • ‘The main focal points in the park are the Iron Age hill fort, which covers around 12 acres.’
    • ‘And on Sunday I will devote around seven hours to the mountain of marking and paperwork.’
    • ‘Despite all the snow we were able to drive at speeds of around fifty mph without any problem.’
    • ‘After Aitken had left the field injured around the hour mark, more chances came Airdrie's way.’
    • ‘Nita joins a group of around six other women who all meet at Mudge Seager's house in Birch Street to knit.’
    • ‘By the end of last week we had got through to around 100 people on the phone.’
    • ‘The case covers dates from around 1988 up to the summer of last year and involves six alleged victims.’
    • ‘It is believed that the victim was in a small silver car when he was surrounded by a group of around five or six black youths.’
    • ‘You can be in your hotel room within around five hours of leaving Bolton, if you fly.’
    • ‘The journey is around 200 miles, and they will arrive in a couple of days in his hired carriage.’
    • ‘It is anticipated that the whole scheme will take around five years to complete.’
    • ‘Meet up at 7 pm for a ride which will last for around one hour, organised by the club's coaches.’
    • ‘The Bolton group meets every Friday and a typical meeting attracts around 20 people.’
    • ‘However, current research shows that bits of hair are only present in around half the sinuses in this area of skin.’
    • ‘It quickly became a volatile situation with a mob of around 50 people surrounding them.’
    approximately, about, round about, roughly, in the region of, something like, in the area of, in the neighbourhood of, of the order of, or so, or thereabouts, there or thereabouts, more or less, give or take a few, plus or minus a few
    View synonyms

preposition

  • 1On every side of.

    ‘the palazzo is built around a courtyard’
    ‘the hills around the city’
    • ‘She felt them crowd around her in a circle, felt the pressure and the heat of unclothed flesh.’
    • ‘The air around the hill of Knocknashee is responding to the sound of music these days and nights.’
    • ‘Straight for the hills, the green hills around Glasgow, apparently glad to get out of there alive.’
    • ‘They were the very last thing he saw before the world seemed to darken around him and spin.’
    • ‘It exists not just in computer, but in the information streaming through the air around us.’
    • ‘She was lost in the swelling crowd around her, shattered into a million pieces and so cold.’
    • ‘In the center of its pool was an elevated statue of a cupid, and around it was a circular green hedge.’
    • ‘Ugly looking shacks not trees or flowers now wrapped many hills in and around Seoul.’
    • ‘Daly is laughing as he speaks, but those around him take his words extremely seriously.’
    • ‘There are huge TV screens dotted around showing the Jubilee with crowds around them.’
    • ‘Together they made their way through the sea of people as they crowded around Him.’
    • ‘Peter agreed he was a real handful who made life a misery for those living around him.’
    • ‘She is watched through eyes of steel, unable to understand the presences around her.’
    • ‘Crucially, there was no bleeding around the needle marks of the chest drain, some six inches away.’
    • ‘Everything around him began to spin and all he could think of was the girl in his arms.’
    • ‘Kamihl the Afghan refugee is as much my neighbour as those living around me.’
    • ‘We also have just had speed humps installed around Beulah Hill crossroads.’
    • ‘What has happened to the player whose very presence intimidated those around him?’
    • ‘Why do two people who share such a deep bond treat each other and everyone around them so badly?’
    • ‘Then proceed to talk to everyone around you as if there were nothing else to do there.’
    • ‘The town nestles in a bay which looks over to the hills around Loch Striven, adding a misty splendour to the scene.’
    • ‘There was a long oak table that ran the length of the room, and several chairs around it.’
    on every side of, on all sides of, about, circling, encircling, surrounding, encompassing, framing
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of something abstract) having (the thing mentioned) as a focal point.
      ‘our entire culture is built around those loyalties’
      ‘you can organize your essay around an existing critical controversy’
      • ‘I would say try and understand the culture around a crime and you are going to better at investigating it.’
      • ‘The line then is only drawn by the culture around transvestites but I might be missing something?’
      • ‘They even take it as their name, and they organize their lives around this principle.’
      • ‘The king then sought to organize a new royalist coalition around a programme of religious liberty for all.’
      • ‘At the height of Britpop, there was something of a consensus culture around rock.’
      • ‘He saw the united front as a way of organising around a specific set of demands.’
      • ‘A movie like this tends to attract an awful lot of abstract nonsense going on around it.’
      • ‘An attempt is made here to organize the decisions around six aspects of necessity.’
      • ‘Many, such as this site, aim to provide a community and generate debate around a common subject of interest.’
      • ‘The reason we say we need that critical mass is the issue around assimilation.’
      • ‘The stronger PCS branches have to help the weaker branches to organise around the dispute.’
      • ‘The EU is actually a set of complex networks, organized around specific policy domains.’
      • ‘Organising your intranet around a portal, for instance, doesn't make it any better.’
      • ‘Olympic organisers wrote the track and field timetable around her bid to win five gold medals.’
      • ‘The forum should be helping people to organise around their chosen themes.’
      • ‘I was meaning to write a few key words as pointers for me to talk around, but ended up writing in complete sentences.’
      • ‘It's the first time the middle east has organized or played host around these issues.’
      • ‘Today the EU seeks to organise Europeans around a consciousness of vulnerability.’
      • ‘However, the organisation around a landing in Norway had been fraught with problems.’
      • ‘Recently she has concentrated her efforts around fundraising for various organisations.’
      • ‘This is therefore an excellent cause to rally around and to test our political power.’
  • 2In or to many places throughout (a community or locality)

    ‘cycling around the village’
    ‘a number of large depots around the country’
    • ‘I drove around most of the Midlands and east of England in this car and it acquitted itself admirably.’
    • ‘A scheduled tour around the county was organised prior to the elderly guest's visit.’
    • ‘For a dead guy, he sure knows how to get his name around town, not to mention the world.’
    • ‘His image is everywhere around this city and he's even had a fast ferry named after him.’
    • ‘I run a website that organizes monthly meetings around the world for your fans.’
    • ‘Organic farms around the UK will open their gates to the public, with events for all the family.’
    • ‘Groups around Britain are organising delegations to send to the conference.’
    • ‘Critics around the world would be amazed at the sheer power the young girl had possessed.’
    • ‘It will be judged by six critics from around the world with the public providing one vote.’
    • ‘The school places a lot of emphasis on music and the choir is in great demand to perform for community groups around the town.’
    • ‘Those that do well around the world find they have to adapt to local culture in order to succeed.’
    • ‘Samaritan's Purse is a Christian organisation providing aid to people around the world.’
    • ‘Individual experts and individual medical bodies around the world criticised it.’
    • ‘Is the fact that American culture is spreading around the earth really a problem?’
    • ‘They were not the only group there as there were organisations from around the country as well.’
    • ‘We spent Wednesday free skiing around the hills, though the snow was patchy.’
    • ‘The band is still going ahead with organising autumn gigs around West Yorkshire in order to sell the album.’
    • ‘In fact the chief executives of most large media organizations around the world are not moguls but barons.’
    • ‘I think it would be churlish to criticise the efforts that have been made around the globe to help.’
    • ‘She persuaded some to speak at some of the meetings she organised around the country.’
    all over, about, here and there in, everywhere in, in all parts of, to all parts of
    View synonyms
  • 3So as to pass (a place or object) in a curved or approximately circular route.

    ‘he walked around the airfield’
    ‘it can drill around corners’
    • ‘Following the route around the museum will certainly keep you fit if nothing else.’
    • ‘We followed the noise and found ourselves walking a boardwalk around the steep cliff.’
    • ‘Dive guides tend to take you on a rather circuitous route around the coral formations.’
    • ‘The bus will also serve Kirkwall, doing a route around the town between each trip to Stromness.’
    • ‘Relief cash was also raised through a sponsored walk around Bury town centre on Wednesday.’
    • ‘Instead she walked around at ground level following me as I walked nervously around the top level.’
    • ‘Once, Tracy and I were walking around Avebury and the darkness of winter closed in upon us.’
    • ‘The track there could only be provided around the existing stock car track.’
    • ‘It will start at York's Millennium Bridge and take in a scenic route around the walkways.’
    • ‘She made her way around the circular temple and to the back of the stone building.’
    • ‘You will be spilt into groups of five and you will each be given a route around the palace.’
    • ‘The circular walk around Lake Burwains is one of the best places in Lancashire to watch birds in winter.’
    • ‘I was able to drive all the way around it and came out of it in sixth place.’
    • ‘Still, dashing around the circular keypad is tough and does not make for lengthy e-mails.’
    • ‘The dog ran up around the edge of the lake, then up the hill to where I was to get a big cuddle.’
    • ‘The new access route will take people around the back of the waiting room and towards the crossing gates.’
    • ‘The walk follows a two-mile route around the village of Staveley on New Year's Day.’
    • ‘This is despite the fact that Devizes is the only town in the county to have no relief routes around its town centre.’
    • ‘I have to edge along a small path around a hill where pear trees sway, heavy fruit.’
    • ‘Their ship was on the west side of the island, and they were now rowing around it.’
  • 4So as to encircle or embrace (someone or something)

    ‘he put his arm around her’
    ‘warming her hands around a cup of coffee’
    ‘the polar vortex around Antarctica’
    • ‘Dad always has a crowd around him because of his intelligence and sense of humor.’
    • ‘His arm was wrapped around me and every once in a while his lips would brush my cheek.’
    • ‘Brush around the edges with butter and fold in the sides then roll up into fingers.’
    • ‘The very first bed on the left hand side had a green curtain pulled around it.’
    • ‘Fold this extra pastry back over to make a rim around the edge, then place it rim side down on top of the figs.’
    • ‘Unfortunately we were few, and the police horses were able to ride around us and surround us.’
    • ‘I guess it was an exaggeration of the collective myths all families spin around themselves.’
    • ‘Strong westerly winds circle the globe in middle latitudes around this vortex.’
    • ‘With that, he placed the necklace around his neck and embraced her for one last time.’
    • ‘He currently has a Latvian scarf around his neck to keep his throat warm.’
    • ‘I have to face these facts, so that I won't cling on to the deceit he spun around me.’
    • ‘This evening I was hopping around the bedroom after coming out of the shower, towel tied around my waist.’
    • ‘They would bind it on their arms or put it in small bag and wear it around the neck.’
    • ‘If it wasn't for a circle of gold around his neck, he would have appeared desolate.’
    • ‘An indigenous tradition is to tie an amulet of a fish bone from the Nile around the child's neck or arm.’
    • ‘I found her several feet away from the fight area on the ground, a crowd huddled around her.’
    • ‘In a quick movement, I flung my arm around his neck and placed the gun to his side.’
    • ‘Then they dive at one another, egged on by a small crowd that has gathered around them.’
    • ‘He was joined by two other men who all crowded around her and started wiping the liquid off her.’
    on every side of, on all sides of, about, circling, encircling, surrounding, encompassing, framing
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Usage

Are around and round (as preposition and adverbial particle) interchangeable? In US English, the normal form in most contexts is around; round is generally regarded as informal or nonstandard and is standard only in certain fixed expressions, as in the park is open year round and they went round and round in circles

Phrases

  • have been around

    • informal Have a lot of varied experience and understanding of the world.

      • ‘Annual festivals in cities like Edmonton, Ottawa and Halifax have been around for years.’
      • ‘These too have been around for years, and you can still catch them on any day in the mornings and early afternoons.’
      • ‘They have lots of players with Premiership experience, and a coach who has been around.’
      • ‘The idea is not new, however, having been around for many years.’
      • ‘Gap years, sabbaticals, years off - call them what you will - have been around for a long time now.’
      astute, sharp-witted, sharp, acute, intelligent, clever, alert, canny, media-savvy, perceptive, perspicacious, observant, discriminating, sagacious, sage, wise, far-seeing, far-sighted
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  • around the bend

    • Crazy; insane.

      ‘I'd tell you if you were going around the bend’

Origin

Middle English: from a- ‘in, on’+ round.

Pronunciation

around

/əˈraʊnd//əˈround/