Definition of aristocratic in English:

aristocratic

adjective

  • Of, belonging to, or typical of the aristocracy.

    ‘an aristocratic family’
    ‘a stately, aristocratic manner’
    • ‘Mercer surely had his first wife's upper-class eastern European background in mind when he tackled the theme of the Nazi impact on old aristocratic German families.’
    • ‘In 1940 she married S.W.R.D. Bandaranaike, the scion of an equally aristocratic Christian family in the low country.’
    • ‘In a flashback, we see the progress of their relationship - he, a gifted violinist; she, a pianist from an aristocratic family.’
    • ‘If the only choice in practice was between aristocratic oligarchy and democracy, then he favoured democracy.’
    • ‘He was defending the mixed system that existed in the Britain of his day - a combination of aristocratic, commercial, oligarchic, and democratic elements.’
    • ‘Under Othman, the third Caliph who belonged to the aristocratic Ummayid branch of Mohammed's tribe Quraysh, the conquests ceased briefly.’
    • ‘The prestige and the social standing of the government clerks surpassed by far those of any other class of the population with the exception of the army officers and the members of the oldest and wealthiest aristocratic families.’
    • ‘Wollstonecraft spent part of her short life as a teacher and then as a governess to the daughters of an aristocratic family, whose sons, as was usual for boys, went to boarding school.’
    • ‘Many of the subjects are necessarily members of wealthy or aristocratic families, and part of the purpose of the show is to explore the place of children in society their dress, and their toys.’
    • ‘Initially, its goal was to represent the interests of middle-class folks who resented the aristocratic inclinations of the Federalists.’
    • ‘A member of an aristocratic family, he was privately educated; between the wars he studied in Switzerland and Vienna.’
    • ‘Sinclair was born in 1878 to a family with Southern aristocratic ties.’
    • ‘This is a legacy from the days of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, when social position was determined by aristocratic or civil service hierarchy.’
    • ‘Excavations revealed single cremated burials in each, perhaps the members of a local, wealthy aristocratic Roman family.’
    • ‘Much of this had been granted in the form of hereditary manorial estates to aristocratic families or important monasteries.’
    • ‘As elsewhere in Europe, great bishops or abbots often belonged to royal or aristocratic families.’
    • ‘The state ostensibly dominated the society, but it was in fact the landed aristocratic families that kept the state at bay and perpetuated local power for centuries.’
    • ‘They also received male visitors to their family palaces, and furthered familial alliances through an exchange of visits with female members of other aristocratic families.’
    • ‘Calvinism and the Roman Catholic Church; some of the leading Calvinist were also members of senior aristocratic families.’
    noble, titled, upper-class, blue-blooded, high-born, well born, patrician, elite
    well bred, dignified, courtly
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: from French aristocratique, from Greek aristokratikos, from aristokratia (see aristocracy).

Pronunciation:

aristocratic

/əˌristəˈkradik/